cleansing

easy one-pot kichadi

30th December 2018

This is a quick satisfying one-pot meal to prepare. It is easy to digest, nourishing, balancing and a complete protein in one bowl. When eaten together, rice and dal provide all the essential amino acids for a nutritionally sustainable meal. Perfect for when you don’t have a lot of time to cook and need something fast but with enough nutrients to sustain you. It can be eaten in the morning or evening and takes only half an hour to prepare.

When preparing Kichadi, it is important to understand the different types of dal or legumes used and their energetic qualities.  There is one type of dal which is favourable and used most often – whole moong(mung beans) and when husked and split becomes split moong. These two are easy to digest, gentle on the system and cause minimum disturbances to all constitutions.  All other dals or legumes are recommended to use in moderation and small quantities.

When serving Kichadi, drizzle with a spoon of ghee. GHEE is a magical golden substance that has many benefits for the human system including improved digestion as well as making everything taste better.

I recently spent a week with my daughter helping her organise her first apartment in London. She needed a few quick no-fuss meals that she could make while balancing studies and working – this was one of them.

Easy One-Pot Kichadi

Preparation – 35 minutes

Serves 2

ingredients
⅓ cup/60g split moong dal
⅓ cup/60g white basmati rice
3 cups/750ml water

1 Tbsp ghee
¼ tsp mustard seeds
½ tsp cumin seeds
Pinch of asafoetida
½ small red chilli (optional)
6 curry leaves
⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup/30g chopped cabbage
½ cup/70g finely chopped carrot

¾ tsp fine rock salt
½ tsp jaggery/brown sugar
1 Tbsp dried shredded coconut
1 tsp finely chopped ginger
1 – 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped
to serve
ghee
Indian spicy pickle

preparation
1.  Place the dal and rice in a bowl, rinse with water until the water runs clear, drain and pour in 3 cups water. Set aside.

2.  In a saucepan over medium-high heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the mustard seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida, and chilli – fry for a few seconds, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly.

3.  Add in the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for a few seconds.

4.  Pour the dal, rice and water into the voggarane, bring to boil over high heat, then lower to maintain a rapid simmer.

5.  While waiting for the dal and rice to boil, finely chop the carrot and cabbage and add this to the simmering rice and dal.

6.  After 20 minutes, turn the heat to low and cover. When the dal and rice have softened, add the salt, jaggery, ginger, dried coconut, lemon juice and coriander – turn off the heat, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to meld together.

Taste adding more lemon or salt as needed. Serve drizzled with ghee.

suggestions

  • Soak the dal and rice in the morning for quick evening preparation.

variations

  • Replace the white basmati rice with quinoa. Using ½ cup quinoa and ¼ cup dal.
  • Change the vegetables to suit the seasons.
  • Add ½  – 1 tsp sambar powder, replace the lemon juice with tamarind paste.

barley kichadi

22nd February 2017

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Barley is cooling, sweet, and mildly astringent.  Ideal for decreasing pitta and kapha.  It can improve a sluggish digestion and has a slightly drying effect, helping to clear fluids from the body. Barley is considered one of the “good” carbohydrates.

If the water in which barley is boiled, is given to a person suffering from diarrhoea it gives him instant relief.

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~ evening reflections.

~ Pleopeltis polypodioides, also known as the resurrection fern. The resurrection fern gets its name because it can survive long periods of drought by curling up its fronds, appearing grey-brown and dead. However, when just a little water is present, the fern will uncurl and reopen, appearing to “resurrect” and restoring itself to a vivid green colour within about 24 hours.

~’Chasmanthe floribunda, African cornflag.

~ the outer edges of the wall at the end of the day.

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barley kichadi

preparation 50 minutes

serves 3 – 4

I have been making this weekly, quick and easy with a scoop of thick yoghurt and a drizzling of ghee. It is a wonderful warming, soothing and cleansing meal.  When simmering the dal, simmer until they still hold their shape and before they turn to mush.  I use organic pearl barley in this recipe, if using unhusked barley it will need an overnight soaking and longer cooking time – recommended to boil separately ½ hour before adding the dal.

Our favourite barley recipe is this lovely soothing lemon barley water.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g  pearl barley

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)

8 cups /2-litre water

1 cup/90g celery/fennel, chopped

1 cup/50gcabbage, chopped 

1 heaped teaspoon rock salt 

1 heaped Tbsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

¼ cup/60g frozen green peas

voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli, chopped

10-15 fresh curry leaves, torn in half

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

½ cup fresh coriander, roughly chopped 

2 cups kale/spinach/fenugreek leaves, roughly chopped

to serve 

yoghurt

ghee

preparation 

1.  In a saucepan, wash the barley, until the water runs clear, then pour in 8 cups water, bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer for 10 minutes. Add the dal and simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

2.  Add the celery and cabbage – simmer until barley has softened and the dal is cooked but still holding their shape – approximately 20 – 30 minutes. Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.

3.  Add the peas, salt, jaggery, dried coconut and chopped ginger – simmer for a few minutes, then turn off the heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, and chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly, then pour the voggarane into the kichadi.

6.  Squeeze in the lemon juice, and stir in the coriander and kale. Cover allow to sit 5 minutes, then check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

When ready, drizzle with ghee, garnish with coriander and serve with a spoon of yoghurt.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

beetroot orange ginger juice

19th December 2011

Inspiration: divine influence; to be filled with spirit.

I find nature to be so wise and inspiring. Our dietary needs vary according to the season.  And if we pay attention to our body’s signals, we will find that the types of foods that bring us satisfaction will be different in the Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring.  At the beginning or midway of a cold Winter season (depending on where you live), we have these sweet, golden fruits hanging from the trees full of vitamin C which is just what is needed at this time of year.  And if I listen to my body carefully, I find my craving for them is strongest when nature has provided them.

In my garden, each season is different and I am rediscovering how natural and rewarding it is to eat different foods to what is available seasonally.  Every day, something a little bit different, inspiring and beautiful emerges.  Among many other things, I have beetroot and an orange tree within 10 metres from my kitchen – nature’s way of creating awareness and inspiration to join them to make such a sweet, fresh cleansing drink.

A perfect welcome when you feel low energy, overwhelmed, or emotional.  A time to pause and take positive steps to renew yourself.

The orange is a great source of vitamin C, vitamin A and flavonoids which helps against infections by supporting your immune system.

The ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory agent that is useful for relieving symptoms associated with arthritis, motion sickness and nausea. Ginger helps the body get rid of toxins, stimulates circulation, boosts your immune system and provides a pleasant “warming” sensation against winter chills.

Beetroot has a very grounding energy, improves your circulation, cleans your body and purifies your blood.  One of the major benefits of beet juice is that it contains a colour pigment called betalain. This is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.  Beetroots are high in folic acid and manganese.  The green leaf is high in vitamin A, C, K as well as calcium and iron.  Vitamin C increases iron absorption, so raw beetroot is a great way to get your daily dose.

What a wonderful way to embrace Winter!

beetroot orange ginger juice

Inspired by this post

Serves 2 glasses

ingredients 

2 small-medium beetroot, roots plus greens – the greens contain most of the healthy minerals and vitamins

4 oranges – peeled

1-inch knob fresh ginger

preparation 

1.  Wash the beetroot and their greens and peel the rind off the oranges.

2.  Push all ingredients through a vegetable juicer.  If you use organic beetroot and ginger, you don’t have to peel them.

3.  Pour it into glasses, stir and serve.

references :

https://www.drweilblog.com/display/Search?searchQuery=ginger&moduleId=3567333&moduleFilter=&categoryFilter=&startAt=0

https://www.thebestofrawfood.com/benefits-of-beet-juice.html

Goodness shared from Stacey

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