walnuts

carob walnut chip cookies (gluten-free, vegan)

22nd November 2019

These cookies have crunchy edges with a soft centre, a rich buttery flavour with studs of walnuts, oats and carob chips.  It’s surprising how delicious they are!

Chocolate contains theobromine – a stimulant. Like all stimulants, it is unsupportive for yogic practices that require focus of the mind. Carob is an excellent replacement for chocolate and has hardly a trace amount of theobromine. I have made them with both chocolate and carob, and prefer the softness of the carob.

carob walnut chip cookies

Preparation – 25 minutes

Baking – 12 – 15 minutes

Makes 12 medium or 8 large cookies.

Recipe slightly altered from Healthier Together by Liz Moody.

ingredients

1 flax egg (2 Tbsp ground flax seeds + 3 Tbsp water)

1 tsp vanilla extract

½ cup/120g homemade almond butter

¼ cup/25g almond flour

¼ tsp fine-grain rock salt

½ cup/65g coconut sugar

½ tsp baking soda

¼ cup/25g chopped walnuts

¼ cup/25g rolled oats (gluten-free)

¼ cup/35g unsweetened carob chips or chopped carob bar

preparation

1.   Preheat the oven to 375F/190C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.

2.   Mix together the ground flaxseed and water in a medium bowl. Allow to sit for 15 minutes to thicken.

3.  Add to the flaxseed, vanilla and almond butter – mix together with a spoon until well combined.

4.  In another bowl, mix together the almond flour, salt, coconut sugar, baking soda, walnuts, oats and carob chips.

5.  Add to the flax-almond mixture, mix, working the dough a bit to get everything distributed evenly (the dough may seem a bit dry and thick – keep mixing.)

6.  Scoop heaped teaspoon full into your hand and squeeze into balls. Place on the baking sheet, leaving about 1-inch between them, and slightly press down with your fingers.

7.  Bake for 12 – 15 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through until the edges turn golden. Remove from oven and let them cool on the tray for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. These cookies are best eaten warm from the oven, or later that same day. 

Note:  For freshly baked cookies anytime, refrigerate some of the dough for later.

Variation: Replace the carob with small currants or chopped raisins which have been soaked in water for 10 minutes.

apple walnut cake (vegan)

4th October 2019

This cake base originated from Amy Chaplin’s first book, ‘At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen’ and has been adapted, posted and baked many times with different variations to suit the seasons. In Spring, there is this rhubarb cardamom cake or these raspberry quinoa muffins.  In Summer, I replace the base with the recipe below and make these ginger peach muffins or when the tree is heavy with plums, the original, plum millet cake. When the cooler days creep in and the leaves start to fall, Autumn arrives and I halve figs to place over the top and sprinkle with almond flakes or a pear and macadamia based on this recipe. With Winter close behind this cinnamon apple walnut crumble is a good place to be or a spiced pumpkin version sounds inviting. As you can see when you have a good base recipe the variations are endless!

~ dried fennel seeds

~ leaf and light

~ fennel flowers

apple walnut cake

Preparation – 40 minutes

Baking – 35 minutes

Serves 8 or (9 muffins baked for 35 minutes using half the apple filling)

ingredients

¼ cup/50g millet

¾ cup/185ml water

walnut crumb

¾ cup/90g walnuts, roughly chopped

2 Tbsp/40g coconut sugar

2 Tbsp/40g maple syrup

1 tsp cinnamon powder

apple filling

4 small/2 large apples (245g), peeled and chopped into small uniformed cubes

1 Tbsp ghee/coconut oil

1 Tbsp brown sugar/maple syrup

½ tsp cinnamon powder

cake ingredients 

1½ cups/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

¼ tsp fine rock salt

¾ cup/220g maple syrup (can replace with ½ cup/65g raw brown sugar plus ¼ cup/50g almond milk)

 cup/65g mild-tasting olive/coconut oil

¼ cup/50g almond milk

2 Tbsp/20g vanilla essence

cook the millet

1.  Rinse the millet, drain and place in a pan with water, bring to boil, simmer rapidly for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until water has evaporated. Remove from heat; let sit for 10 minutes before removing the lid. Measure out 1 cup/180g cooked millet – set aside.

2.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Line an 11 x 7-inch baking pan or favourite cake tin with baking paper.

walnut crumb

3.  In a small bowl, place the walnuts, sugar and maple syrup, stir to combine and set aside.

apple filling

4.  In a pan over medium heat, add the ghee/oil and sugar, melt the mixture, stirring to combine. Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes, then add the apples and cinnamon, toss to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 3 – 4 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

 assemble the cake

5.  Whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

6.  In a separate bowl, combine millet, maple syrup, oil, almond milk and vanilla essence – whisk to combine. Pour into the dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix.

7.  Spread the batter evenly in the baking pan and place the apple cubes over the top and let them rest on the surface.

8.  Crumble over the walnut crumb.

9.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 – 40 minutes, until golden or a toothpick comes out clean. Remove and allow to cool.

Serve with a generous dollop of thick cream.

roasted red pepper walnut spread

1st July 2016

roasted red pepper

One of the (much well received) additions to our table recently is this roasted red pepper walnut spread.  This is one recipe I have made quite a few times as an entree, spread or more filling side dish to an otherwise light salad based meal. Whatever the occasion, time of day or audience I can almost always be assured of…’mmm…whats in this?!’. My answer has always been…’Oh, I’ll post it on my blog’. So here it is.

If there is one vegetable when roasted that brings its goodness, it’s a roasted bell pepper.  After being roasted in the oven, the skin becomes charred, wrinkly and the inside sheds its blistered skin – emerging more succulent and sweeter than the raw version. The transformation is magical and delicious.

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-a garden edging its way into Summer

red pepper

roasted red pepper walnut spread

Makes about 2 cups

I  have been looking for another tasty dip other than the usual hummus or guacamole we serve so often here, and one that satisfies the matured taste buds of young adults.  The roasted pepper adds a distinct sweetness and the toasted walnuts and breadcrumbs balance out that sweetness.  It is great served as a dip, as a spread on sandwiches or over a base for a pizza.

Recipe from 101 cookbooks – Heidi Swanson.

ingredients 

3 medium/450g red pepper

¾ cup/70g walnuts

¼ cup/25g whole-grain bread crumbs

½ tsp crushed red chilli flakes

½ tsp whole cumin seeds

2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve

2 Tbsp honey/pomegranate molasses

4 Tbsp tomato paste

½ tsp fine-grain rock salt

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 410F/210C.

2.  Place the whole peppers on a rimmed tray lined with a baking sheet.  Roast, until the skin has become charred, and wrinkled, 50 to 60 minutes.  While the peppers roast, place a few slices of sourdough bread in the oven and toast until crunchy, approximately 20 minutes, also place the walnuts into the oven to toast for 5 minutes. Remove and set aside to cool.

3.  When the pepper is ready, remove from the oven and gather up the corners of the baking sheet from the tray and wrap the peppers (use a kitchen towel to help if it is too hot).  This will steam them enabling the skins to easily peel off.  Cool until you can handle them, about 15 minutes, then remove the skin, seeds, and stems.   Keep the liquid from the peppers to add to the processor.  Set aside.

4.  Dry roast the cumin seeds in a small pan, when lightly toasted turn off the heat and grind to a powder with a mortar and pestle.  Set aside.

5.  Using a food processor attached with an S blade, process the bread crumbs, when coarsely ground, measure out a ¼ cup and return to the processor, add the chilli flakes and walnuts and process until the walnuts are roughly ground.

roasted red pepper ingredients

6.  Add the cumin seeds, olive oil, honey, tomato paste, salt and skinned peppers with their roasting liquid, process until everything is well incorporated and you have a smooth consistency.

7.  Garnish with basil leaves, extra walnuts, and drizzle with olive oil.  Serve with fresh crackers, toasted bread, or with freshly made chapati.

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pumpkin bread with a toasted walnut cinnamon swirl (vegan)

6th April 2015

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Just before we left for Israel for the holiday break, I was trying to use up most things in the kitchen. With this in mind and the arrival of a new cookbook, ‘At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen’ by Amy Chaplin, I was perusing through it the night before and was drawn to a recipe for pumpkin bread. It is an amazing book full of delicious recipes.

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mizpe hayamim – Israel

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pumpkin bread with a toasted walnut cinnamon swirl

Recipe found ‘At Home in the Wholefood Kitchen’ with a few tiny variations.  You can use any winter pumpkin, but the dense-fleshed ones like kabocha and red kur work the best because of their low water content.    

Lately, I have been mixing the cinnamon walnut twirl straight into the batter so that it is incorporated throughout.

Makes one 12-inch loaf pan

cinnamon walnut swirl

1 cup/100g toasted walnut halves, chopped

2 tsp cinnamon powder

2 Tbsp coconut or brown sugar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

pumpkin batter 

½ medium kabocha pumpkin, peeled, seeded, and cut in ½-inch dices (about 3½ cups/440g)

2 cups/240g whole-spelt flour

2 tsp aluminium-free baking powder

½ tsp salt

¼ cup, plus 2 tablespoons olive oil (65g)

½ cup/140g maple syrup

2 tsp vanilla essence

1 Tbsp vinegar

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.  Lightly oil a loaf pan and line bottom and sides with parchment paper.  Set aside.

make the cinnamon walnut swirl 

2.  Place the walnuts on a tray and toast for approximately 8 minutes.  Allow to cool, roughly chop and place in a bowl, with the cinnamon, maple syrup, and sugar – mix to combine and set aside.

make the pumpkin batter 

3.  Steam the pumpkin for 10 minutes, or until soft – drain well, and cool.

4.  Place in a bowl and mash with a fork – measure out 1½ cups and place in a medium bowl, add the oil, maple syrup, vanilla essence, and vinegar – whisk until smooth and set aside.

5.  In another medium bowl, add the flour, baking powder, salt, and stir to combine.

6.  Using a rubber spatula, fold the flour mixture into the pumpkin batter until just combined.

7.  Spread half of the batter over the bottom of loaf pan. Layer the cinnamon-walnut mixture evenly over batter and top with remaining batter.

8.  To create a swirl, use a small rubber spatula or butter knife to zig-zag back and forth, finishing with one stroke through the centre. I like to sprinkle the top with 2 tablespoons of brown sugar and extra cinnamon and with roughly chopped pumpkin and sesame seeds.

9.  Place in the oven and bake for 45 – 55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.  Remove from the oven and allow to sit for 5 minutes before turning out and place on a wire rack. Slice and serve warm or at room temperature.

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steamed lentil beetroot walnut salad

8th March 2015

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I thought I would revisit this salad and give it a new life and breath.  It was posted a while back and I was recently reminded how lovely it is.  I have made it twice this last week, taking advantage of the abundance of greens in the garden and beets being so fresh in the market lately.

It is a recipe from my leather-bound journal that I would travel the world with, documenting thoughts and new-found recipes.  Since then, this book has been given a new lease of life – recovered, rebound and blessed with a few `goodnessis isms´.

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steamed beetroot lentil walnut salad

Inspired by Leonie, whose food creations were always full of vitality and inspiration.

For this recipe, you can use any sort of greens available.  My favourite, being a combination of kale, spinach and beet greens.  If you are lucky enough to have the greens still attached to the beetroot, use those as well.  Depending on what I am serving,  I sometimes leave out the feta or serve it on the side for those who don’t eat dairy, or for a lighter salad you can omit the lentils.

ingredients 

6 medium beetroot

½ cup red lentils

400g spinach/kale/beet greens

½ cup small mint leaves

150g feta cheese, cut into small cubes

¾ cup walnuts/pecans, roughly chopped

for the dressing

2 Tbsp honey

1 tsp cumin seeds

¼ cup lemon juice

cup olive oil

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.

2.  Spread the nuts evenly on a baking tray and toast for 12 – 15 minutes.  Remove and roughly chop.

3.  Steam the whole beetroot, about 35 – 45 minutes, then drain, cool slightly and peel while still warm – cut into small uniform cubes.

4.  Meanwhile, cover the lentils in water and lightly simmer for about 7 minutes until they are still whole and keep their crunch – drain and set aside.

5.  Steam the rinsed greens slightly until just wilted.  This takes very little time – careful not to overcook.  After steaming, run under cold water to retain their vibrant colour – gently squeeze any excess water out and finely chop.

6.  In a large bowl, combine the warm lentils, spinach and beetroot, then sprinkle over the cubes of feta, nuts and fresh mint leaves.

7.  Prepare the dressing, toast the cumin seeds lightly and grind them roughly with a mortar and pestle, whisk together with the honey, lemon juice, olive oil, and vinegar.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

8.  Drizzle the dressing over the salad.  This salad is equally lovely while still warm or at room temperature.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

baklava

13th April 2013

The end of our first winter in Portugal.  Just beautiful.  I wish I could express the loveliness that surrounded us this morning.  The light was awe-inspiring, golden and clear, clean and divine.

There are two magnolia trees right outside the entrance door, so I see them every time I come and go.  In Winter, they are both completely uninhibitedly bare.  Standing together side by side, in all of their euphoric natural beauty.  They are lovely, with their knobbly tendrils and smooth, graceful limbs.  There are small buds. Lots and lots of them getting bigger and bigger, almost bursting with their divine essence. The other morning there was a splash of color, just a little at first, and now, soft blushes of the loveliest pink.

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Traditionally, baklava is made with honey, however in Ayurveda honey should never be cooked, boiled or baked.  In high temperatures, honey becomes nonhomogenized and gluelike. As a result, it increases the toxicity of the body. I replace the honey with maple syrup with wonderful results!

 

baklava

This is a recipe from Kristin, which she made on more than one occasion when we had our house overflowing with special guests for our teacher’s workshop in Israel.  We make it for very special occasions in her honour.

ingredients 

1 packet phyllo dough (18 sheets)

450 grams chopped small nuts – walnuts, pistachios, pecans, almonds (I use 350g walnuts and 100g pistachios)

1 cup butter or ghee, melted 

3 tsp cinnamon powder

generous pinch rock salt

for the syrup 

cup water

cup raw brown sugar

6 cardamom pods

cup maple  syrup

½ tsp vanilla extract

preparation 

1.  Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350F.

2.  Make the syrup  place the water, sugar and cardamom pods in a saucepan and simmer over medium heat for 15 minutes, remove from heat, add maple syrup and vanilla, and stir until well blended. Set aside and allow to cool.

3.  Grind the nuts – in a food processor – process using the on/off pulsing action until the nuts are roughly chopped.  I like them quite chunky and not too powdery fine, then place in a bowl with the cinnamon powder and salt – mix well.

4.  Unroll the phylo dough and with scissors, cut to the size of your tray.  I use an approximately 23 x 32 cm tray.  Cover with a damp cloth so it does not dry out.

5.  Assemble the baklava   with a pastry brush, brush the surface of the tray with melted butter, then place one phylo sheet in the bottom of the dish, brush with butter.  Continue with seven more sheets, brushing each individually.

6.  Spread half the nut mixture over the phylo sheets, then layer two more sheets of phyllo pastry, brushing each individually, then spread the rest of the nut mixture, then layer 8 more sheets on top – butter each layer.

7.  Brush the top with butter.  Using a sharp knife cut all the baklava into diamonds by slicing straight across in one direction, then diagonally in the other direction.  Make sure you cut all the way through the layers.  (This is done before baking as it will be very fragile after it’s been baked.)

8.  Bake for 30 minutes or until golden and remove the baklava from the oven.

9.  Remove the cardamom pods from the syrup and pour evenly over the already cut baklava.  Let it sit until it comes to room temperature,  at least an hour.  Cut through the same lines before serving.

variations

  • For a vegan version, replace the butter with mild-tasting olive oil.
  • Instead of brushing each individual layer, after slicing the baklava, pour the melted butter over the top and then bake.  The butter seeps all the way through each layer, making its way to the centre of each piece as it bakes and resulting in perfectly cooked baklava without the tedious layering.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

health crunch muesli cookies (vegan)

9th October 2011

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Happiness

=

Getting up early.

No humidity.

First rain.

Yellow leaves falling.

A big girl who will still sit in your lap, sometimes.

A big boy that still needs my hugs, all the time.

The first green salad from the garden.

Golden afternoon light.

Little, white jasmine flowers falling on the ground, waiting to be picked up,

and

being lost in their sweet scent.

The quietness in that deep silence.

Friends.

Winning scrabble.

 Peacock feathers.

The smell of little babies.

A new camera and its endless possibilities.

Damp smell of earth.

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I  would like to try making these cookies with the left-over almond pulp from making almond milk. I have been looking for a sweet which is gluten-free and dairy-free.  These I stumbled across on this website – www.teresacutter.com.  It is important to grind the almonds very finely which will absorb the liquid much better.  Also, the second time I made these, I added 1 cup cranberries, instead of ½ cup; half chopped very finely and the rest, roughly chopped.  I also pressed half an almond in the top each biscuit, which added another dimension to them.  I did tweak the recipe a bit from the original.

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health crunch muesli cookies

Approximately 30 cookies

ingredients 

cup organic coconut oil, melted

½ cup maple syrup (depending on your preferred sweetness)

1 tsp vanilla extract

2 cups almonds

1 cup walnuts/pecans

cup ground linseed/flaxseed

½ cup sesame and sunflower seeds (a combination of both to make ½ cup)

½ – 1 cup dried cranberries, roughly chopped (depending on how much you like cranberries)

¼ cup dried shredded coconut

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 150C/330F.  Line two baking sheets with baking paper.

2.  In a small mixing bowl, pour the melted coconut oil over the maple syrup, and whisk in the vanilla extract – set aside.

3.  In a food processor, place in the almonds and grind until fine, then empty into a large mixing bowl.

4.  Place the walnuts into the food processor and whiz for a few seconds, just until they are roughly broken up, add to bowl.

5.  Add linseed, sesame and sunflower seeds, coconut and cranberries – combine well.

6.  Pour in the wet mixture – mix thoroughly until well combined.

7.  Divide into 30 balls (If the mixture is crumbling just add a little hot water until it becomes easier to handle.)  Place onto the prepared baking tray, then flatten slightly.  At this stage, press a whole almond into each if you prefer.

8.  Bake for 30 – 40 minutes until golden and well cooked through. Watch carefully!

Rest on the tray until cool, then store in an air-tight container.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

Rotem’s date syrup cake (vegan & gluten-free option)

8th August 2010

This earthy date syrup cake was made for me a few days after I gave birth to my first child, Yasmin, just over 11 years ago.  Yasmin was born at home and my one request was for friends and relatives to prepare nourishing meals for us during that first week.  Rotem, a friend and relative, baked this wonderfully moist, comforting cake on one of those days.  I love to serve it with thick Greek yoghurt and drizzled with maple syrup.  It is so delicious and impossible to resist.

The key is to get good quality pure date syrup, rich and dark in quality.

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Rotem’s date syrup cake

Update: A heartfelt thank you to all of you who have been visiting this site and making this Date Syrup Cake, it has been many years since I have made it and it seems to be the one cake which gets the most views, so I decided to revisit and give a vegan option and make it shine with new photos.

Makes 1 x 28cm loaf or 10 cupcakes (bake – 35 mins)

ingredients 

½ cup/100g butter (room temperature) or replace with 100g melted coconut oil 

¾ cup/255g silan (date syrup)

2 eggs or 2 Tbsp/12g ground flax soaked for 10 mins in ½ cup/50g water

¼ cup/50g nut milk or water

rind from one lemon

1 cup/140g whole-wheat flour

1 Tbsp ginger powder

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

¼ tsp fine rock salt

1½ cups/150g finely chopped walnuts/pecans (I blitz for a few seconds in the food processor)

preparation 

1.   Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Grease the bottom and sides of a loaf pan and set aside. 

2.  Cream the butter or oil and silan together using a hand mixer or whisk until soft and well mixed, add the eggs (or flax eggs), milk, lemon zest and mix well.

3.  In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, ginger, baking powder, baking soda and salt, then stir in the walnuts (set aside 2 Tbsp for sprinkling on top) and fold into the wet mixture – stir well to combine.

4.  Pour mixture into the prepared loaf tin, sprinkle remaining walnuts over the top and bake in the oven for 40 minutes or until well risen, golden and springy to touch.

variation

  • To make this cake gluten-free; increase the flax seeds to ¼ cup/22g (leaving the water the same), replace the wheat flour with 1 cup/130g millet flour, ½ cup/45g gluten-free oat flour, ½ cup/45g almond flour.

Goodness shared from Stacey

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