turmeric

carrot-turmeric seeded rice bread (gluten-free)

12th August 2020

We had a very special guest this weekend, who was gluten-free, so it was a good opportunity to try Amy Chaplin’s gluten-free bread from ‘Whole Food Cooking Every Day’. This bread has a lovely moist crumb and leaves you feeling nourished and satisfied. It is very easy to make and goes nicely drizzled with olive oil and spread with homemade hummus.

The moist texture of this bread is the combination of soaked seeds and grains, rolled oats and psyllium husks.

Psyllium comes from the seeds of a herb called Plantago ovata that is mostly grown in India. When water is added to psyllium husks, they form a thick gel that helps bind the dough in this recipe.

note

  • Be sure to buy psyllium husks, they form a thick gel that helps bind the dough in these recipes.
  • Keep in mind you need to soak the seeds and/or grain overnight before making this bread.
  • This recipe is extremely versatile; if you don’t have one of the nuts or seeds, simply substitute whatever you have on hand. You can also omit the carrot and turmeric for a more neutral-tasting bread.
  • Store in an airtight container at room temperature up to 3 days or in the fridge for a week. The sliced bread freezers well.

 

carrot-turmeric seeded rice bread

Makes 1 – 11.5 x 21 cm loaf

Recipe from ‘Cooking Whole Foods Every Day’ by Amy Chaplin.

Pre-preparation 8 hrs

Preparation 20 mins

Baking 1hr 20 mins

ingredients

1½ cups/280g short-grain brown rice, soaked overnight

½ cup raw unhulled sesame, pumpkin, or sunflower seeds, soaked overnight with the rice (above)

1 cup/250ml water

1 cup/100g rolled oats

2 Tbsp/8g psyllium husks

1 Tbsp aluminum-free baking powder

3 Tbsp coconut or olive oil

1 tsp fine rock salt

2 tsp turmeric powder

2 medium/115g carrots, grated

black sesame, sunflower or pumpkin seed for sprinkling over loaf

preparation

1. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Line a 11.5 x 21 cm loaf pan with parchment paper, leave at least a 1-inch overhang. Set aside.

2. Pour the soaked rice and seeds into a large strainer and rinse. Place the strainer over a bowl and set aside to drain.

3. In a food processor, place the soaked rice and seeds, water, oats, psyllium husks, baking powder, oil, salt and turmeric powder – process until well combined and the grains are broken down but the mixture still has texture.

4. Add half the carrots and pulse until just combined, then add the remaining carrots and pulse to incorporate.

5. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan, making sure to spread it into the corners, sprinkle with sesame seeds or seeds of choice.

6. Bake for 40 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 40 minutes, or until the edges of the bread are golden and have pulled away from the sides of the pan. Lift and cool on a wire rack. Be sure to cool the bread completely before slicing.

golden honey passionfruit elixir & a chia pudding

15th August 2016

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A recipe created for  Holmes Place magazine as part of an ongoing concept of seasonal ‘superfoods’ throughout the year.

Elixir: a substance, usually a liquid, with a magical power to cure, improve, or preserve something.

This Elixir works as a wonderful topping for your morning yoghurt or warm cooked oats. At other times, mixed in with a salad dressing; drizzled over vanilla ice-cream for an evening treat; as a drink, stirred into warm water or warm milk; or added to smoothies or juices for a flavour kick. Turmeric root is often used in Ayurvedic medicine for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiseptic properties.   For this elixir, it is combined with the multiple wonderful benefits of passionfruit, honey and ginger, all healing and preventive powerhouses on their own.  

When buying passion fruit, the ripe fruit should be firm and heavy with wrinkled skins, and have a little “give”.  If the skin is not deeply wrinkled, but only shrivelled and unappealing, keep the fruit at room temperature until it is.

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Golden Honey Passionfruit Elixir

Makes 1 cup (240mL)

Recipe adapted from Tara O’Brady – Seven Spoons.

When passionfruit are not in season, replace with an extra ¼ cup, honey.

ingredients

½ cup mild tasting honey, preferably raw

½ cup ripe passionfruit pulp (approximately 6 fruits)

2 Tbsp ginger, grated

1 heaped tsp turmeric powder/ 1 Tbsp grated turmeric root

Zest from 1 lemon

2 pinches freshly ground black pepper

preparation

1.  Grate the ginger and lemon zest.  Halve the passionfruit and scoop out the pulp and seeds to measure half a cup – set aside.

2.  Pour the honey into a jar, add the passionfruit pulp, ginger, turmeric, lemon zest and ground pepper – stir to combine well.  

3.  Allow to stand for 30 minutes before using, or an hour if you can, then cover and refrigerate.  The longer it sits, the more the flavours balance and settle.  Stir before serving.  Use within 1 week.

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Chia Pudding with Berries & Golden Honey Passionfruit Elixir

Serves 2

chia pudding 

2 Tbsp chia seeds

½ cup almond milk/or nut milk of choice

¼ tsp vanilla essence

serving options

1 cup Greek-style yoghurt or choice of non-dairy yoghurt

2 – 4 Tbsp Golden Honey Passionfruit Elixir

Fresh seasonal fruits, such as sliced peaches/nectarines, strawberries and raspberries, washed and chopped

2 – 4 Tbsp chopped almonds/granola

To make the chia pudding

1.  Place the chia seeds, vanilla essence and nut milk in a jar.  Screw on the lid, shake a few times and refrigerate for 30 minutes or preferably overnight.  Stir again before serving.

2.  When ready to serve, divide the yoghurt into two individual bowls and evenly spoon over the chia pudding.  Drizzle the Golden Passionfruit Elixir over the top, arrange the fruits and berries, and garnish with fresh mint leaves, toasted almonds or your favourite granola.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

Aytana’s winter warming dal

14th December 2014

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When we hold workshops, we host up to 12 people staying in our home and up to 16 – 20 for dinner, I draw up a timetable/roster and everyone signs up for their turn at cooking, cleaning, lighting the oil burner, refreshing flowers and the general cleanliness of the yoga room over the course of the 10-day seminar. This way all the cooking and stress is evenly distributed, and I also get to enjoy the workshop – but the best part is that I get to be inspired by other amazing cooks and enjoy their creations.

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“What we have learnt is a seed, it will grow to open a new world.”

Aytana’s Winter warming dal

This was a recipe which Aytana made one night – simple, smooth, creamy, quick and delicious. The key here is the blending/whisking of the dal at the end to create the soothing creaminess and the stewing of the tomatoes at the beginning. It is easy to digest and the light consistency makes it appealing in all seasons.  Depending on the season, I usually serve it with an okra or cabbage palya, a big bowl of steamed green beans and kale, and brown rice. Or in Summer accompanied by a crunchy salad.

Serves 4

ingredients 

1 cup yellow moong dal, split

4 cups water

½ tsp turmeric powder

1 Tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped

for the voggarane

2 tsp ghee/oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 – 7 curry leaves

tsp finely chopped fresh chilli or 1 tsp of rasam powder

tsp asafoetida powder

1 cup ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

1 carrot, finely chopped

1 tsp rock salt

½ cup coriander leaves, roughly chopped 

preparation 

1.  Rinse the dal until the water runs clear, drain and add the ginger, turmeric, and 3 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat – simmer for 30 – 40 minutes or until the dal is soft and has broken down.

prepare the voggarane

2.  While the dal is cooking, in a small saucepan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the cumin seeds and fry until they brown.

3.  Add asafoetida powder, curry leaves, chilli and fry for 20 seconds.

4.  Stir in the tomatoes and carrots, cover and allow the tomatoes to stew for 20 minutes, then add the cooked dal – simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5.  Remove from heat and add salt, then beat with a wire whisk or using a hand blender, blend until smooth and creamy.

6.  Add coriander and stir to combine.  Garnish each portion with a twist of lemon and drizzling of ghee.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

golden cauliflower soup

9th November 2014

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on a windy day…..

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everything moves….

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golden cauliflower soup

Serves 4 – 6 

Inspired by ‘The Sivananda Yoga Cookbook.’

This has very minimal ingredients but is surprisingly delicately flavourful.  I served it with a loaf of freshly baked bread, this beetroot salad (all finely chopped instead of grated) and this guacamole.

ingredients 

1 large/750g cauliflower

1 Tbsp ghee

1 Tbsp cumin seeds

½ teaspoon turmeric

2 potatoes/1 sweet potato, peeled and roughly chopped -185g

4½ cups/1.5L boiling water

1 Tbsp dried coconut, soaked in enough hot water to cover

1 tsp fine rock salt

fresh ground pepper

preparation  

1.  Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop stalks – set aside.

2.  Melt the ghee in a large pan, add the cumin seeds and toast until golden – 1 minute, then lower heat, add the stalks, cauliflower pieces and turmeric – saute for 5 minutes, stirring well to make sure the florets are coated with turmeric.

3.  Remove half the florets with a slotted spoon and set aside to add to the soup at the end.

4.  Add the potatoes and boiling water – simmer, uncovered for 15 minutes.

5.  Cool slightly, then puree the soup in a food processor or using a hand immersion blender, until smooth.

6.  Stir in the coconut and its soaking water, add the reserved cauliflower florets and simmer for 5 – 10 minutes longer.

7.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve drizzled with ghee and a sprinkling of turmeric and freshly ground cumin.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

turmeric flavoured millet, amaranth & seasonal vegetables

1st June 2014

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I thought I would share this simple, but extremely quick and easy nutritious meal I have most mornings. You will appreciate the ease which the body digest it.  It is actually my first meal of the day at around 10 or 11 o’clock, depending on when I feel the first signs of hunger.

I love these one-pot meals that use a number of different foods cooked in a single pot with ample water.

The importance of this bowl is finding the right millet to use. I use a very small grain (foxtail millet) as opposed to the bigger commonly found millet, which can become quite dry when cooked.  The foxtail millet is much finer and softly moist, and when combined with amaranth, the two together create a very soothing, playful texture.

Amaranth is high in protein, fibre, rich in vitamins, and exceptionally rich in the amino acid, lysine, which is absent in most other cereal grains. It is also high in calcium and has an iron content four times higher than brown rice.

I change the vegetables to what is in season and depending on what can be picked from the garden. Sometimes I use celery when there is no fennel or broccoli, spinach opposed to kale, sweet peas instead of beans etc.  To serve, I  keep it as simple as possible, just adding a little Indian pickle (something spicy), half of an avocado or scoop of yoghurt and lavishly drizzle with ghee.

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turmeric flavoured millet,amaranth & vegetables

Serves 2

The dish can be made with quinoa, rice or any grain of your choice – the cooking times may vary though.

ingredients 

¼ cup/50g millet

¼ cup/50g amaranth

2 cups water

1 tsp ghee

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 cup fresh seasonal vegetables – carrot, cherry tomatoes, green beans, cabbage, a handful of small broccoli florets, finely chopped

½ medium fennel bulb, finely chopped

for the voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves, roughly torn

pinch asafoetida (optional)

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

few rounds of freshly ground pepper

a handful of green leaves (kale, small broccoli leaves, chard, etc)

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

preparation 

1.  In a heavy-bottomed pot, wash the millet and amaranth, drain, pour in 2 cups water and 1 heaped spoon ghee and turmeric, bring to boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, simmer uncovered for 2 mins.

2.  Add the vegetables which require more cooking time and set aside the broccoli and fresh greens leaves, which will be added just before it has finished cooking – allow to simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

3.  Turn off the heat, add the broccoli florets greens, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  Heat ghee in a small saucepan, add cumin seeds, asafoetida (if using) and curry leaves – allow to sizzle for a few seconds, swishing the pan for the spices to fry evenly. Add to the millet and vegetables.

5.  Stir in the salt, pepper and jaggery, recover and allow to sit undisturbed for a 10 minutes before serving.

6.  When serving, drizzle with ghee.  If not serving with pickle, add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Updated:  Enjoyed this, this morning sitting in the sun.  I added okra and red pepper which I sautéed together in a very hot skillet, charring the edges a bit.  It was a delicious combination.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

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