split moong dal

cosamberi – Indian spiced raw salad

31st May 2017

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Cosamberi is a delicious light, easily digestible raw salad that nourishes the body. Cosamberi is best eaten as a side dish alongside the main meal. It can also be eaten as a small snack in the morning or evening.  It balances vata, pitta and kapha.

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Less is More 

There are hundreds of varieties of food, but in order to be fit and healthy for Realization, we need to eat only a few of them. Once we establish a basic diet, we may or may not decide to eat other kind of foods. We are best served to work hard only for what is most needed to maintain a balanced mind and body. This is our duty and the essence of aparigraha (the value of having few belongings).

~ Dr. Shankaranarayana Jois – The Sacred Tradition of Yoga

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cosamberi

Serves 4 – as a side dish.

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme. 

Any left-over coconut can be grated, sealed and stored in the freezer. If unable to obtain fresh coconut, replace with ½ cup/35g dried shredded coconut.  For best results, grate the carrot and coconut small and fine, using the finer side of a box grater.

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ingredients 

¼ cup/50g split moong dal  

1 heaped cup/80g grated fresh coconut

1 large carrot – approximately 100g

1 Tbsp + 2 tsp/25ml lemon juice – divided

⅓ cup/15g coriander, finely chopped 

½ tsp fine rock salt

voggarane 

1 Tbsp + 1 tsp/20ml peanut/coconut oil

½ heaped tsp mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp split urad dal

1 dried red Byaadagi chilli, finely chopped

20 fresh curry leaves

pinch asafoetida powder

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

pre-preparation 

1.  Rinse dal until the water runs clear.  Cover again with water and set aside to soak for 1 hour.  Then, drain the dāl through a fine-mesh sieve and allow it to dry for 15 minutes.

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2. Finely grate the coconut – measuring 1 tightly packed cup.  Wash, peel and grate the carrot – measuring 1 tightly packed cup and pour 1 tsp lemon juice over the carrot to prevent discolouring. Rinse, dry and chop the fresh coriander – measuring ⅓ cup.

3.  Place in a medium-sized bowl along with the soaked dāl, sprinkle with salt – do not mix.

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prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add oil and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the urad dāl and chilli – fry until the urad dāl is golden-brown.  Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric, and continue to fry for a few seconds, swishing the pan for the spices to fry evenly.

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5.  Pour the voggarane into the bowl, and add the remaining lemon juice, mixing well to allow all colours and flavours to blend evenly.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

green gram tovve (split moong dal)

9th July 2015

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precious evening twilight

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“Every thought you produce, anything you say, any action you do, bears your signature.”

~Thich Nhat Hahn~
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soothing split moong dal

Serves 3 

Inspired by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya.

I have been making this a lot lately, sometimes as a soup or other times with rice and a simple palya. Drizzled with ghee, it is a complete soothing, easy to digest and cleansing meal. Brings strength, balance along with calmness and quietness to the body and mind. Helpful to the elderly and due to its lightness can be used during a period of sickness. Supports the yogic practice.

I like to add thinly sliced cabbage or chuchu and grated carrot just towards the end of cooking. If using whole moong dal instead of the split decrease the amount of dal to ½ cup and proceed with the recipe.

ingredients 

¾ cup/125g moong dal split (split yellow lentils)

4 cups/1-litre water

1 tsp rock salt 

1½ tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 heaped tsp finely chopped ginger

voggarane 

1 Tbsp  ghee

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli

10 fresh/dried curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

¼ cup coriander leaves, finely chopped

to serve

vegetable palya

rice

preparation 

1.  In a medium saucepan, wash dal until the water runs clear, pour in water and bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer until creamy and the dal has broken down – approximately 30 minutes. 

If using a pressure cooker, allow for three whistles before turning off the heat, then set aside for 20 minutes or until the pressure has subsided.

2.  While waiting for the dal to cook, chop the chilli into three pieces and tear the curry leaves in half (this way everyone is guaranteed to consume a curry leaf and benefit from their medicinal properties).

3.  Once the dal has softened, add salt, jaggery, coconut and ginger – simmer for 5 minutes more, then turn off heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, heat ghee, add mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, and chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly, then pour the voggarane into the dal.

6. Stir in the lemon juice , add coriander – stir to combine.  Check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

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