millet

apple walnut cake (vegan)

4th October 2019

This cake base originated from Amy Chaplin’s first book, ‘At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen’ and has been adapted, posted and baked many times with different variations to suit the seasons. In Spring, there is this rhubarb cardamom cake or these raspberry quinoa muffins.  In Summer, I replace the base with the recipe below and make these ginger peach muffins or when the tree is heavy with plums, the original, plum millet cake. When the cooler days creep in and the leaves start to fall, Autumn arrives and I halve figs to place over the top and sprinkle with almond flakes or a pear and macadamia based on this recipe. With Winter close behind this cinnamon apple walnut crumble is a good place to be or a spiced pumpkin version sounds inviting. As you can see when you have a good base recipe the variations are endless!

~ dried fennel seeds

~ leaf and light

~ fennel flowers

apple walnut cake

Preparation – 40 minutes

Baking – 35 minutes

Serves 8 or (9 muffins baked for 35 minutes using half the apple filling)

ingredients

¼ cup/50g millet

¾ cup/185ml water

walnut crumb

¾ cup/90g walnuts, roughly chopped

2 Tbsp/40g coconut sugar

2 Tbsp/40g maple syrup

1 tsp cinnamon powder

apple filling

4 small/2 large apples (245g), peeled and chopped into small uniformed cubes

1 Tbsp ghee/coconut oil

1 Tbsp brown sugar/maple syrup

½ tsp cinnamon powder

cake ingredients 

1½ cups/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

¼ tsp fine rock salt

¾ cup/220g maple syrup (can replace with ½ cup/65g raw brown sugar plus ¼ cup/50g almond milk)

 cup/65g mild-tasting olive/coconut oil

¼ cup/50g almond milk

2 Tbsp/20g vanilla essence

cook the millet

1.  Rinse the millet, drain and place in a pan with water, bring to boil, simmer rapidly for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until water has evaporated. Remove from heat; let sit for 10 minutes before removing the lid. Measure out 1 cup/180g cooked millet – set aside.

2.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Line an 11 x 7-inch baking pan or favourite cake tin with baking paper.

walnut crumb

3.  In a small bowl, place the walnuts, sugar and maple syrup, stir to combine and set aside.

apple filling

4.  In a pan over medium heat, add the ghee/oil and sugar, melt the mixture, stirring to combine. Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes, then add the apples and cinnamon, toss to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 3 – 4 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

 assemble the cake

5.  Whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

6.  In a separate bowl, combine millet, maple syrup, oil, almond milk and vanilla essence – whisk to combine. Pour into the dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix.

7.  Spread the batter evenly in the baking pan and place the apple cubes over the top and let them rest on the surface.

8.  Crumble over the walnut crumb.

9.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 – 40 minutes, until golden or a toothpick comes out clean. Remove and allow to cool.

Serve with a generous dollop of thick cream.

rhubarb cardamom cake with rhubarb-vanilla compote (vegan)

19th May 2019

A recipe I make often based on these Raspberry Muffins. The sweet almond crumb adds a delicious crunchy texture which contrasts nicely with the sourness of the rhubarb. The maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup brown sugar. If you don’t want to spend the time arranging the rhubarb, chop into 1 cm pieces and sprinkle over the cake.

rhubarb cardamon cake with a rhubarb-vanilla compote

Preparation – 30 minutes

Baking time – 45 minutes

Serves 8 – 10

for the millet

¼ cup/50g millet

¾ cup/185ml water

for the almond crumb

⅓ cup/25g flaked almonds

2 Tbsp coconut sugar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

1 Tbsp lemon juice

for the cake

4 rhubarb stalks (250-300g)

1½ cup/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

1 tsp cardamom powder

¾ cup/220g maple syrup

 cup/65g mild-tasting olive/coconut oil

¼ cup/55g almond milk

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

1 Tbsp grated ginger

zest of 1 lemon

¼ tsp fine rock salt

prepare the millet

1.   Rinse the millet, place in a pan with the water, bring to boil, simmer rapidly for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until water has evaporated. Remove from heat; let sit for 10 minutes before removing the lid. Measure out 1 cup/180g cooked millet – set aside.

2.  Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF and line an 11 x 7-inch baking tray or favourite cake tin with parchment paper.

prepare the almond crumb

3.  In a small bowl place the almonds, sugar, maple syrup and lemon juice, stir to combine and set aside.

prepare the rhubarb

4.  Unless the rhubarb stalks are very slender, cut them in half lengthwise, then cut the stalks at an angle, two pointing one way and the other two the opposite so that they will fit together in a herringbone pattern. Use your pan to do a trial run, cutting to size and arranging your stalks however you like – set aside.  

prepare the cake

5.  In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and cardamom – set aside.

6.  In a medium jug, whisk together the maple syrup, olive oil, almond milk, vanilla, ginger, lemon zest, salt and cooked millet.

7.  Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the wet ingredients, stir until well combined – be careful not to over-mix.

8.  Spread the batter evenly into the pan and arrange the rhubarb stalks on top. Spend a little extra time arranging your rhubarb – this is my favourite part! Don’t press the fruit into the batter – just place over the top and let it rest on the surface.

9.  Crumble over the almond crumb. 

10.  Bake for 40 – 45 minutes, until golden or a toothpick comes out clean. Remove and allow to cool.  Make the compote.

Serve with a generous dollop of Greek yoghurt or cream and a spoon of rhubarb-vanilla compote.

rhubarb-vanilla compote

Preparation – 25 minutes

Makes 1 cup

ingredients

2 cups/225g rhubarb, diced (redder part of the stems or replace half with raspberries)

⅓ cup/90g maple syrup

½ tsp freshly grated ginger

½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise

preparation

1.  Place the rhubarb, maple syrup, ginger and in a medium saucepan.

2.  Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into a saucepan, adding the pod as well.

3.  Cook, covered over low heat. (It’s important to begin slowly so the rhubarb warms up and begins to release its liquid. Cook the rhubarb for about 15 minutes.

4.  Remove the cover and increase heat to medium. Cook for 5 minutes more, stirring occasionally until the rhubarb is completely broken down. Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

plum millet cake (vegan)

16th July 2015

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I know when we have entered into Summer, as each morning I can pick the first of the Jasmine to place on our altar  – just one perfect flower, but Wow!  Such a scent.

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Jasminum spp

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Using the last of our plums from this tree and sharing them with our friends, neighbours, visiting teachers, and our growing ducklings and swans.

plum millet cake

Makes one 9-inch square pan with 12 square slices.

Recipe slightly adapted from ‘At Home in the Wholefood Kitchen’.

I have been making this with raspberries instead of plums.  I use 150 grams frozen/fresh raspberries, following the recipe below, sprinkle the top with flaked almonds and 2 Tablespoons of coconut sugar. 

for the millet

¼ cup/50g millet, washed and soaked (if you forget to soak the millet, add 2 Tablespoons extra water).

½ cup/125ml water

for the cake

1½ cup/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp aluminium-free baking powder

zest of 1 lemon

zest of 1 orange

¾ cup/185ml plus 2 Tbsp maple syrup (maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup sugar)

¼ cup + 2 Tbsp/90ml extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil, melted 

¼ cup/60ml almond milk

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

¼ tsp fine rock salt

8small plums /340g, pitted and cut into ½-inch slices – If using very juicy plums, allow to drain off the excess liquid for 5 minutes.

for the topping

¼ tsp cinnamon

1 Tbsp brown sugar (optional)

to cook the millet

1.  Drain and rinse millet, place in a small pot and pour in ½ cup water.  Bring to a boil over high heat; cover pot, reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes.  Remove from heat; let sit for 10 minutes before removing the lid and fluffing up with a fork.  You should have approximately 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cooked millet.

2.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Grease a 9-inch square baking dish with oil or for easy removal, line with baking paper.

to prepare the cake

3.  Place the flour and baking powder into a medium bowl; stir to combine and set aside.

4.  In another bowl, combine the maple syrup, olive oil, almond milk, vanilla and salt.

5.  Add the flour mixture, and using a rubber spatula, stir until combined, then fold in the plums, cooked millet and citrus zest, stirring until just combined – be careful not to over-mix.

6.  Pour the batter into the baking pan.  Sprinkle with cinnamon, remaining 2 tablespoons of millet and the brown sugar.

7.  Bake for 30 – 35 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

turmeric flavoured millet, amaranth & seasonal vegetables

1st June 2014

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I thought I would share this simple, but extremely quick and easy nutritious meal I have most mornings. You will appreciate the ease which the body digest it.  It is actually my first meal of the day at around 10 or 11 o’clock, depending on when I feel the first signs of hunger.

I love these one-pot meals that use a number of different foods cooked in a single pot with ample water.

The importance of this bowl is finding the right millet to use. I use a very small grain (foxtail millet) as opposed to the bigger commonly found millet, which can become quite dry when cooked.  The foxtail millet is much finer and softly moist, and when combined with amaranth, the two together create a very soothing, playful texture.

Amaranth is high in protein, fibre, rich in vitamins, and exceptionally rich in the amino acid, lysine, which is absent in most other cereal grains. It is also high in calcium and has an iron content four times higher than brown rice.

I change the vegetables to what is in season and depending on what can be picked from the garden. Sometimes I use celery when there is no fennel or broccoli, spinach opposed to kale, sweet peas instead of beans etc.  To serve, I  keep it as simple as possible, just adding a little Indian pickle (something spicy), half of an avocado or scoop of yoghurt and lavishly drizzle with ghee.

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turmeric flavoured millet,amaranth & vegetables

Serves 2

The dish can be made with quinoa, rice or any grain of your choice – the cooking times may vary though.

ingredients 

¼ cup/50g millet

¼ cup/50g amaranth

2 cups water

1 tsp ghee

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 cup fresh seasonal vegetables – carrot, cherry tomatoes, green beans, cabbage, a handful of small broccoli florets, finely chopped

½ medium fennel bulb, finely chopped

for the voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves, roughly torn

pinch asafoetida (optional)

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

few rounds of freshly ground pepper

a handful of green leaves (kale, small broccoli leaves, chard, etc)

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

preparation 

1.  In a heavy-bottomed pot, wash the millet and amaranth, drain, pour in 2 cups water and 1 heaped spoon ghee and turmeric, bring to boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, simmer uncovered for 2 mins.

2.  Add the vegetables which require more cooking time and set aside the broccoli and fresh greens leaves, which will be added just before it has finished cooking – allow to simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

3.  Turn off the heat, add the broccoli florets greens, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  Heat ghee in a small saucepan, add cumin seeds, asafoetida (if using) and curry leaves – allow to sizzle for a few seconds, swishing the pan for the spices to fry evenly. Add to the millet and vegetables.

5.  Stir in the salt, pepper and jaggery, recover and allow to sit undisturbed for a 10 minutes before serving.

6.  When serving, drizzle with ghee.  If not serving with pickle, add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Updated:  Enjoyed this, this morning sitting in the sun.  I added okra and red pepper which I sautéed together in a very hot skillet, charring the edges a bit.  It was a delicious combination.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

:: lentil millet chilli ::

17th November 2011

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Before you taste…

Pause to smell.

 Take in the beauty of dish in front of you.

Take a moment to be grateful.

Breathe!

Take a bite.

Let the flavours greet your tongue.

Feel your mouth water.

Then, chew, slowly.

Close your eyes.

::lentil millet chilli::

Inspired by this post

Serves 4 – 6

ingredients 

1 Tbsp olive oil/ghee

1 red bell pepper/capsicum, finely chopped

1 Tbsp cumin powder

1 Tbsp sweet paprika

1 tsp hot paprika (or chilli powder)

1 Tbsp coriander powder

1 x 240g can crushed tomatoes

1 x 100g tub tomato paste

2-inch strip of kombu (optional – adding seaweeds to recipes soften the beans/lentils and speed cooking time, as well providing a wealth of nutrients)

¾ cup green-brown lentils

¼ cup red lentils

¼ cup millet

4 – 6 cups water/stock

salt and pepper, to taste

finely chopped fresh parsley

preparation 

1.  Heat ghee in a saucepan, add chopped red capsicum and saute gently for a few minutes, then add cumin, paprika and coriander powder – continue to cook for 1 minute.

2.  Pour in the tin of crushed tomatoes, refill the can and rinse out any goodness left into the pot.

3.  Add the tomato paste and kombu.

4.  Rinse the lentils and millet, add to pot with another 3 – 4 cups water.  Partially cover and continue to cook at a slow simmer for 1½ hours.  Add extra liquid if needed.

5.  After the long simmer, add salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with finely chopped parsley.

Serve with cooked millet or quinoa, a dollop of yoghurt, green salad and guacamole.

Goodness shared by Stacey

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