lemon

a soothing broth and vegetable palya in one dish

15th May 2022

The liquid from the cooked dal is used as a soothing broth, while the drained and cooked dal is seasoned into a vibrant green palya. The broth is a soothing treat, with the addition of lemon juice and pepper. If you are feeling slightly under the weather, this broth is heavenly.

tips

  • Toor dal can be found in any Indian supermarket. I use a brand which I buy in Portugal, it is smaller and more polished with a quick cooking time. The toor dal variety purchased from the Indian store takes a much longer time to soften. With this in mind, you may need to experiment and cook the dals separately until you are familiar with each of their individual cooking times, or pre-soak the toor dal and cook together for 30 minutes, adding more water as needed. You don’t want the dal to be mushy, but rather hold its shape.
  • For quick preparation, the vegetables can be added to the simmering dal. I like to cook them separately to keep the vegetables vibrant.

a soothing broth and vegetable palya from one dish

preparation – 40 minutes

palya serves – 3 persons

broth serves – 2 cups

Recipe adapted from ‘Mysore Style Cooking’ by V. Sandhya

ingredients

¼ cup/50g whole moong dal

¼ cup/50g toor dal 

5 cups/1.4 litres water

1 flat tsp fine rock salt

voggarane

1 Tbsp ghee/peanut oil

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 fresh red/ green chilli, seeds removed, roughly chopped

8-10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

1 ½ cups/200g green beans, finely chopped 

¼ cup/50g water, more as needed

1 bunch /50g dill, finely chopped stems and all

2 Tbsp dried/freshly grated coconut

2 Tbsp lemon juice, plus more for the broth

preparation 

1.  Cook the dal: In a pot, place the rinsed moong dal and water, bring to boil, turn down the heat, then simmer rapidly, uncovered for 18 minutes, add the rinsed toor dal and simmer for a further 10 mins, or until they just become soft, but still hold their shape. As mentioned above depending on the variety of toor dal, you may need to cook both dals together for 30 minutes or experiment separately until you are familiar with each of their individual cooking times.

2.  Add salt to taste, then drain the broth from the cooked dals and set both broth and dal aside.

3.  Prepare the voggarane: Heat ghee in a pan, add the mustard seeds; when the seeds start to pop and splutter, add asafoetida, cumin and chilli – fry until fragrant, then add the curry leaves and turmeric – fry few seconds. Add the beans, stir to combine with the spices. Pour in the water and simmer until the beans are cooked and the water has evaporated –  approx 4 – 5 minutes, you may need to add more water 1 tablespoon at a time.

4.  Turn off the heat, add the dill – mix well until combined with the spices and slightly wilted, add the cooked dal, coconut and lemon juice. Stir to combine, taste adding more salt and lemon, then transfer to a serving bowl. Serve with rice and drizzle with ghee.

5. To the remaining broth, add ⅛ tsp freshly ground pepper and 1 Tbsp lemon juice, taste adding more salt and lemon, as needed.

lemon-sourdough pound cake (vegan)

1st March 2021

Another delicious recipe by Aran Goyoaga which was shared in her newsletter. I adapted it slightly by making it vegan; replacing the 3 eggs with ground flaxseed, adding baking powder, using maple syrup instead of honey and reducing the glaze by half. 

I have recently entered the world of sourdough bread and every Monday I make a loaf of sourdough to bake the following day, so this recipe was perfect to use any leftover starter and use up the lemons which are hanging heavy from the trees in the garden. 

The sourdough starter does add more complexity to the crumb. I use a 1:1 ratio, meaning equal amounts of flour and water. 

If you don’t have a sourdough starter to discard, replace it with ½ cup/70g rice flour, and ⅓ cup/80g of water/buttermilk, and increase the baking powder to 1 ½ teaspoon.

Scroll down for the blueberry variation.

To save time, soak the flaxseed first, then grate the zest and prepare the other ingredients giving the flax the time it needs to thicken.

lemon-pound sourdough cake

Preparation 15 minutes

Baking 45 – 55 minutes

Makes one pound cake (11 x 25cm loaf pan)

*I take my starter (sourdough leaven) from the fridge in the evening, just before bed, and measure out 40g, and then feed it – 100g flour + 100g water. Allow it to sit overnight, by the morning, it may be fully active, or even if it has deflated already or hasn’t quite reached its full potential, no matter. With this starter, I make this lemon-pound sourdough cake.

ingredients

3 Tbsp/22g ground flaxseed + ½ cup/100g hot water (allow to sit for 10 mins as below)

¾ cup/150g light brown sugar

2 Tbsp finely grated lemon zest (zest from 3 lemons), plus more for garnishing

2 Tbsp/50g maple syrup (this gives a crisp caramelized exterior)

*½ cup + 2 Tbsp/200g sourdough starter

½ cup/110g extra virgin olive oil or neutral-tasting oil

¼ cup/55g lemon juice (1 very juicy lemon)

1 cup/140g brown rice flour

1 cup/100g almond flour

¼ cup/30g tapioca starch (or arrowroot powder)

¾ tsp fine rock salt

¾ tsp baking soda

1 tsp baking powder

glaze

2 Tbsp/25g light brown sugar

2 Tbsp/27g lemon juice (½ of a very juicy lemon)

preparation

1. Preheat your oven to 180C/350F. Generously grease your loaf pan.

2. Into a large bowl add the flax with water and allow to sit for 10 minutes, then add sugar, zest, maple syrup, sourdough starter, oil and lemon juice – whisk until smooth.

3. In a small bowl measure out the brown rice flour, almond flour, tapioca starch, salt, baking soda and powder. 

4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and whisk until smooth. Pour into the prepared pan and bake for 45 – 55 minutes (my oven took 55 minutes.) Bake until a toothpick inserted in the middle of the cake comes out clean. Let the cake cool completely in the pan, then invert onto a platter.

5. Meanwhile, make the glaze by gently heating the sugar and lemon juice together in a small pan until the sugar dissolves – don’t heat for too long. Immediately brush the top of the cake allowing it to drip over the sides. Generously garnish the top with lemon zest (I like to use a combination of lime, lemon and orange.)  

note

  •  Use a metal pan, as suggested and grease it well. Alternately, you can line it with baking paper which makes it easier to lift out of the pan, but note that the exterior won’t caramelize, as it won’t be in direct contact with the metal.
  • Important! Let the cake cool completely. This will allow the crumb to set nicely and not fall apart.

variation with blueberries

  • Fold in 1 cup/125g of blueberries into the batter.

(Always toss the blueberries in cornstarch or tapioca flour before adding them to your batter. This will stop them from sinking to the bottom.)

an exceptional zingy-ginger-sweet-lemon dressing

15th November 2020

This is a dressing I make a lot. It has a fresh, light cleansing quality to it. My favourite way of using it is poured over a vibrant beetroot and carrot salad (see below) which is a simplified version of this salad. It has become a ‘goodnessis’ signature dish when served alongside coriander leaf vanghi bath, vegetable bath, or this whole moong dal. The combinations and flavours complement each other.

I am always up early, to enjoy the quiet of the house and the stillness of the garden.

Each morning the mist materializes, holding us in until midday, it clears and reappears at the end of the day; then repeats itself the next day- shifting our perception from one moment to the next.

an exceptional-zingy-ginger-sweet-lemon dressing

ingredients

2 Tbsp/20g grated ginger

3 Tbsp/30g olive oil

3 Tbsp/50g agave or honey

¼ cup/52g lemon juice

¼ tsp fine rock salt

preparation

1. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small jug with a fork.  Allow to sit for 10 minutes for the flavours to develop.

My favourite way of serving it is to peel equal amounts of beetroot and carrots (depending on the number of people), then using a mandoline, grate the beetroot, then the carrots into a salad bowl. Do not mix just yet. Sprinkle over a generous amount of toasted sesame seeds. When ready to serve, pour the desired amount of dressing over the salad and gently lift to mix the colours and distribute the dressing.

The key to the success of this salad is the right size shavings. Don’t be tempted into using a hand grater as it will produce a sloppier mix that loses its appeal.  Use a mandolin if you have, alternatively you can use the largest grate in the food processor or a knife and cut very, very thin matchstick gratings.

~

lemon poppy seed cake (vegan)

15th July 2020

Moist, tender, full of lemon flavour and filled with nutty poppy seeds. It’s covered with a tart passion fruit glaze. Divine!

I made this on my birthday to put on the birthday table with flowers and lovely gifts the boys put together. And then, made it again the next day for a friend’s birthday. It was enjoyed by all!

lemon poppy seed cake

Preparation – 10 minutes

Baking – 40 minutes

Serves 10 -12

Based on the beloved spice cake.

ingredients 

1 cup + 2 tsp/130g whole spelt flour

1 cup/120g white spelt flour

¾ cup/150g light brown sugar

¼ cup/35g poppy seeds

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp rock salt

½ cup/100g melted coconut oil

1¼ cup/280g almond milk

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

zest from 3 lemons

4 Tbsp/55g lemon juice

2 Tbsp vanilla essence

for the glaze 

1 cup/120g powdered sugar

20g passion fruit pulp (1 small passion fruit)

½ tsp lemon juice

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.  Grease a ring pan or bundt pan well with oil, making sure to get every nook and cranny.

2.  In a medium bowl, add the flours, sugar, poppy seeds, baking powder, baking soda, and salt – whisk to combine.

3.  In another bowl, combine the coconut oil, nut milk, vinegar, lemon zest, lemon juice and vanilla – whisk until the ingredients are emulsified, then pour into the dry ingredients, whisking until all the liquid ingredients are absorbed. Don’t worry the batter will be quite wet.

4.  Pour the batter evenly into the greased cake tin. Place on a middle rack in the oven and bake for 40 – 45 minutes, or until golden and a toothpick inserted comes out clean.  Allow to cool completely before removing it.

5.   Make the glaze by sifting powdered sugar into a bowl and mix in the passionfruit and lemon juice, until you get a thick but pourable consistency.  Test the consistency by taking a spoonful from the bowl and drizzle back into the glaze; the drizzled glaze should leave a trail. If not, may need to add 2 Tablespoons of more powder. Use a spoon or whisk to drizzle the glaze over the top, allow it to run over and down the sides. Before it sets, decorate with lemon zest or flowers. If desired and recommended, drizzle with more passionfruit pulp just before serving.

Enjoy with love, light and blessings!

variation

  • If making them into cupcakes, fill three-quarters full and bake for 35 minutes. Makes 14 cupcakes.

saffron celery rice

25th April 2020

This is a modified rice dish that Donna posted years ago and because I make it often I thought I would revisit and repost it. It is soothing on the digestive system and soft on the eyes with its pale yellow saffron hue. Serve it with roasted vegetables and an avocado-yoghurt sauce. It also goes nicely with a simple tovve and vegetable palya.

Saffron is considered sattvic, balancing all three doshas. One flower bears three stigmas, which are plucked and dried. It contains a carotenoid called crocin, which imparts a golden-yellow hue to dishes.

“Generosity is a noble quality. It opens the mind and heart to appreciate the universe and all that it encompasses.” ~ The Sacred Tradition of Yoga by Dr Shankaranaranaya Jois.

saffron celery rice

preparation 25 minutes

serves 3 – 4

ingredients 

1 cup white basmati rice

2 cups hot water/vegetable stock

two pinches saffron threads (15 threads)

2 Tbsp ghee

1 stalk celery, finely chopped

1 bay leaf

½ tsp fine rock salt

handful coriander, finely chopped

zest and juice of ½ lemon

to serve

roasted vegetables

spicy avocado-yoghurt puree

preparation 

1.  Rinse the rice until the water runs clear, pour into a sieve to drain.

2.  Place the saffron threads in the hot water to steep for 5 minutes.

3.  In a heavy-based pan, heat ghee, then fry the celery, bay leaf and salt; when soft, add rice and stir to coat grains in ghee.

4.  Pour in ¼ cup saffron water and stir. When almost evaporated, add remaining saffron water and bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, uncovered for 8 – 10 minutes or until the water has evaporated.

5.  Turn off heat, and cover with a tea towel between the lid – set aside undisturbed for further 10 – 15 minutes.

6.  Add coriander, lemon zest, juice and season with salt and pepper to taste.

variation

  • A simple variation, omit the celery,  add 1 heaped tsp cumin seeds and 8 curry leaves, fry in ghee. Not necessary to add the lemon and fresh coriander.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

28th January 2019

This cake recipe was shared via Kristin, who had received it from our dearest friend Mary. Mary is at the heart of our community, guiding us on this yogic path and as things progress she continues to be a joy-filled light leading the way for us all. I had the privilege of baking this cake with Leela (Mary’s daughter) while visiting Mary and her family in Boulder.

Heartfelt gratitude to Kristin for sharing this recipe with us and thank-you Leela for such an experience of contentment and joy in playful baking together. Such grace!

This cake actually improves with time, this allows the flavours to come together. You can serve it with yoghurt as a simple dessert, or with a cup of kashaya at the end of the meal. It is moist yet light in texture and aromatic with lemon.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

Preparation  – 10 minutes

Baking time –  30 minutes

Serves 8 – 10

ingredients

½ cup/65g whole wheat flour or coconut flour

1½ tsp baking powder

1 cup/170g fine semolina

¼ + 2 Tbsp/75g raw sugar

½ cup/90g coconut oil

¾ cup/180g plain yoghurt

1 lemon, zest and juice

for the syrup

¼ cup/50g sugar

½ cup water

1 lemon, zest and juice

for garnishing

shredded coconut

icing powder

extra lemon zest

prepare the cake

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan lightly with ghee or coconut oil. Set aside.

2.  In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, semolina and sugar, stir to combine – set aside.

3.  In a small pan over low heat, slowly melt the coconut oil, remove from heat and stir in the yoghurt, lemon juice and zest.

4.  Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients – fold together until well combined, then using a spatula, scrape the batter into the greased cake pan and smooth or press down the top.

5.  Bake for about 30 minutes, until lightly golden, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

prepare the syrup

6.  Near the end of the baking time prepare the syrup. Place the sugar and water in a small saucepan and mix well with a wooden spoon, bring the syrup up to the boil, add the lemon juice and zest – simmer gently for 1 minute or until the sugar has dissolved. Remove the syrup from the heat, and set aside until the cake is ready.

finish the cake

7.  Once the cake is cooked, remove it from the oven – set aside to cool.

8.  Use a small, sharp knife to cut the cake down the centre, then 2 parallel lines either side 3 – 4 cm apart, followed by another set of lines at a 45-degree angle, creating a diamond pattern.

9.  Drizzle the syrup evenly over the cake and sprinkle with shredded coconut and icing sugar. Allow the cake to sit a few hours to allow the flavours to mingle.

Goodness shared by Stacey

Baked and assisted by Leela

Artwork by Kristin

lemon rice

15th October 2016

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A delicious recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme. Lemon rice is a simple and tasty dish, it is easily digested and suitable for all constitutions. It can be used daily and throughout all seasons.  Serve with a simple vegetable palya, green salad or with a cucumber raita.

jasmin-balal-circlejasmin-garlandmaking-jasmine

Beautiful India

Mallige – Jasmine flower, Mysore 

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Lemon Rice (Chitraanna)

Serves 3 – 4

Channa and urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store, when briefly fried in the oil they add a lovely crunch to the dish.  The fresh curry leaves when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months – they have wonderful medicinal qualities. 

Use heaped when measurements except stated otherwise.

ingredients 

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups/500ml water

1 large carrot – 150g

2 tsp ginger, grated 

½ cup/40g dried unsweetened shredded coconut

1 tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp sugar/jaggery

1 -2 Tbsp lemon juice

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane

¼ cup peanut/melted coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

2 tsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dal 

1 medium, mild dried red chilli

10 raw cashew nuts

1 tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

prepare the rice

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and pour in water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer.  Do not cover the pot with a lid, as this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

2.  While waiting for the rice to cool, grate the carrot – measuring 1 cup, grate the ginger, chop the coriander, cut the chilli into 3-4 pieces, halve the cashews. Set aside.

prepare the voggarne

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splatter and pop, add the channa and urad dal – fry for a few seconds, then add the chilli, cashews, and cumin seeds – fry until channa dal is golden in colour. Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder – continue to fry for a few seconds.  

4.  Stir in the grated carrot, ginger, coconut, salt, jaggery and lemon juice – cook for 6 minutes, until all ingredients have combined and the carrot is soft. Turn off the heat.

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5.  Add the cooled rice and coriander and using the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices. Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery or lemon.  Serve immediately.  

Lemon rice can be served with raita, plain yoghurt or accompanied with a vegetable palya.

variation

  • replace the carrot with finely chopped red pepper and cabbage.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

barley salad with roasted-spiced fennel & carrot

3rd April 2016

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The plum trees are blossoming. Spring has arrived.

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A delightful spring salad with substance.

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barley salad with roasted spiced fennel & carrot

Serves 4 -6

A perfect salad for the early weeks of spring when the days are still cool and the season´s beautiful ingredients are starting to trickle in.  I love the chewy, nutty texture of the cooked barley, the satisfying sweetness brought out from the roasted vegetables and the earthy spices that bring it all together.  It is lovely served with a bowl of guacamole or creamy hummus and this beetroot salad.

for the salad 

2 cups barley, cooked (see lemon barley water)

3 medium fennel bulbs

5 medium carrots

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 heaped tsp coriander seeds

1 tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp cinnamon powder

tsp chilli flakes or chilli powder

2 Tbsp ghee/oil

⅓ cup fresh roughly torn mint leaves

⅓ cup finely chopped fennel fronds

for the citrus dressing 

zest from one lemon

zest of one orange

3 Tbsp lemon juice

2 Tbsp orange juice

3 Tbsp olive oil

2 Tbsp sweetener, honey, agave, or maple syrup

¼ heaped tsp salt

preparation

1.  Preheat the oven 405 degrees F/210C. Line a baking tray with parchment paper and set aside.

2.  Prepare the barley, following these directions and keeping the water to make a luscious barley lemonade.

3.  Wash the fennel, trim the fennel stalks and fronds (save for the salad), remove the tougher ends and outer layer – cut into small slices.  Wash carrots, peel and cut into medium chunks.  Set aside.

4.  Dry roast the cumin and coriander seeds in a small pan, when lightly toasted turn off the heat and grind to a rough powder with a mortar and pestle.  Add the cinnamon, turmeric, paprika and salt. Stir to combine.

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5.  Spread the vegetables out in one layer on the baking tray, lined with baking paper, drizzle over the ghee and sprinkle over the spice mix, toss the vegetables until they are well coated.

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6.  Place the tray in the oven and roast for about 30 minutes, or until vegetable are browning. Remove from oven and set aside to cool.

make the citrus dressing 

7.  Combine all the ingredient in a bowl and whisk to combine; set aside.

assemble the salad 

8.  Place the cooked barley in a large salad bowl, pour over the dressing ingredients and allow to marinate for 15 – 30 minutes.

9.  Once sufficiently marinated add to the bowl, the roasted vegetables, fresh mint leaves and fennel fronds.  Toss to combine, season with more salt, and a few rounds of freshly ground pepper.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

lemon barley water

27th March 2016

barley water table

Barley has a cooling thermal nature; sweet and astringent in taste.  Traditionally given to calm sore stomachs.

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-Marguerite daisy, also known as the Argyranthemum frutescens

barley water closeup

lemon barley water

Makes 5 – 6 cups

Recipe adapted from Spring.

Lovely soothing, yet thirst-quenching, drink.  You can add other flavourings to it besides lemon and honey – lemon verbena or ginger would work well.  Don’t discard the cooked barley.  Recipe to follow, stir it through this tomato soup, or dress it simply with a little olive oil and lemon juice and add to a salad.

ingredients 

1 cup /200g pearl barley

10 cups/2.5 litres filtered water

3 – 4 Tbsp light-flavoured honey

3  Tbsp lemon juice, or more to taste

preparation 

1.  In a large saucepan rinse the barley until the water runs clear, drain, pour in the water, bring to boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook uncovered until the barley is tender, this will take about 35 – 40 minutes.

2.  Strain, reserving the cooking water and set the barley aside.

3. Run the barley water through a thinner strainer into a pouring jug, set aside to cool before adding the honey, stirring until dissolved.

4.  Add the lemon juice, taste, adding more honey or lemon as needed.

barleywater closeup

Goodness shared by Stacey

sprouted moong coconut lemon palya

8th March 2016

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I made this last weekend for a relaxed lunch with family and friends.  It was served with fermented Indian dosasspicy chickpea sambar, carrot palya and a bowl of sliced avocados with arugula leaves and mustard micro-greens.  After a last minute panic, thinking this may not be enough, I had moong dal sprouts waiting to be used.  Initially, I had soaked them for fermented moong bean pancakes but had not got around to grinding them, so they ended up as sprouts waiting for a purpose.

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-sweet winter plum tree. In Summer, it is laden with fruit that is brilliant in colour.

-went outside to find her – soft and silent when she is out of the water.

-slate skies, frosty mornings and fingers tingling.

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sprouted moong dal coconut lemon palya

Serves 4

Any left-overs from the fresh coconut can be kept in the freezer, otherwise, it tends to go off before it can be used.  If you are unable to obtain fresh coconut, replace with ¾ cup unsweetened, dried, shredded coconut.  The urad and chana dal add a nice crunch, however, if you are unfamiliar with these, they can be omitted and replaced with roughly chopped cashews or almonds, frying them until golden.  The secret to getting this simple palya just right is to saute the sprouts very minimally so that they are just slightly soft, but still, retain their freshness and are not overcooked.

During colder seasons, sprouts act as an excellent source of fresh vegetables.  Cooking them at this time of year balances their cooling nature. When lightly steaming or sautéing, they still keep their vital and energizing qualities. 

ingredients 

2½ cups sprouted whole moong dal (whole mung beans)

1½ cups freshly grated coconut

1 Tbsp oil/ghee

1 heaped tsp urad dal

1 heaped tsp channa dal

½ tsp cumin seeds

10 curry leaves

zest from a lemon

juice from a lemon

1 cup chopped coriander

salt and pepper, to taste

pre-preparation

1.  For sprouting, follow the directions here, using 1 cup whole moong dal. After an overnight soak, the sprouts are ready in just two-three days.

preparation

2. Grate the fresh coconut into fine shreds until you have 1½ cups.  Set aside.

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the ghee/oil and urad and channa dal, fry until both dals are golden-brown, then add cumin seeds and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds. Add in the sprouts and saute for a few minutes, stirring to keep the sprouts moving.

4.  Add the grated coconut and saute for 2 more minutes, or until the sprouts are slightly wilted, but still hold their shape.

5.  Transfer to a medium-sized serving bowl and mix in the lemon zest, lemon juice, coriander and season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

6.  Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more lemon or salt as needed.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

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