lemon

lemon poppy seed cake (vegan)

15th July 2020

Moist, tender, full of lemon flavour and filled with nutty poppy seeds. It’s covered with a tart passion fruit glaze. Divine!

I made this on my birthday to put on the birthday table with flowers and lovely gifts the boys put together. And then, made it again the next day for a friends birthday. It was enjoyed by all!

lemon poppy seed cake

Preparation – 10 minutes

Baking – 40 minutes

Serves 10 -12

Based on the beloved spice cake.

ingredients 

1 cup + 2 tsp/130g whole spelt flour

1 cup/120g white spelt flour

¾ cup/150g light brown sugar

¼ cup/35g poppy seeds

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp rock salt

½ cup/100g melted coconut oil

1¼ cup/280g almond milk

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

zest from 2 lemons

2 Tbsp/25g lemon juice

2 Tbsp vanilla essence

for the glaze 

1 cup/120g powdered sugar

20g passion fruit pulp (1 small passion fruit)

½ tsp lemon juice

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.  Grease a ring pan or bundt pan well with oil, making sure to get every nook and cranny.

2.  In a medium bowl, add the flours, sugar, poppy seeds, baking powder, baking soda, and salt – whisk to combine.

3.  In another bowl, combine the coconut oil, nut milk, vinegar, lemon zest and vanilla – whisk until the ingredients are emulsified, then pour into the dry ingredients, whisking until all the liquid ingredients are absorbed. Don’t worry the batter will be quite wet.

4.  Pour the batter evenly into the greased cake tin. Place on a middle rack in the oven and bake for 40 – 45 minutes, or until golden and a toothpick inserted comes out clean.  Allow to cool completely before removing it.

5.   Make the glaze: place the sifted powdered sugar into a bowl and mix in the passionfruit and lemon juice, until you get a thick but pourable consistency.  Test the consistency by taking a spoonful from the bowl and drizzle back into the glaze; the drizzled glaze should leave a trail. If not, add a little more powder. Use a spoon or whisk to drizzle the glaze over the top, allow it to run over and down the sides. Before it sets, decorate with lemon zest or flowers. If desired and recommended, drizzle with more passionfruit pulp just before serving.

Enjoy with love, light and blessings!

variation

  • If making them into cupcakes, fill three-quarters full and bake for 35 minutes. Makes 14 cupcakes.

saffron celery rice

25th April 2020

This is a modified rice dish that Donna posted years ago and because I make it often I thought I would revisit and repost it. It is soothing on the digestive system and soft on the eyes with its pale yellow saffron hue. Serve it with roasted vegetables and an avocado-yoghurt sauce. It also goes nicely with a simple tovve and vegetable palya.

Saffron is considered sattvic, balancing all three doshas. One flower bears three stigmas, which are plucked and dried. It contains a carotenoid called crocin, which imparts a golden-yellow hue to dishes.

“Generosity is a noble quality. It opens the mind and heart to appreciate the universe and all that it encompasses.” ~ The Sacred Tradition of Yoga by Dr Shankaranaranaya Jois.

saffron celery rice

preparation 25 minutes

serves 3 – 4

ingredients 

1 cup white basmati rice

2 cups hot water/vegetable stock

two pinches saffron threads (15 threads)

2 Tbsp ghee

1 stalk celery, finely chopped

1 bay leaf

½ tsp fine rock salt

handful coriander, finely chopped

zest and juice of ½ lemon

to serve

roasted vegetables

spicy avocado-yoghurt puree

preparation 

1.  Rinse the rice until the water runs clear, pour into a sieve to drain.

2.  Place the saffron threads in the hot water to steep for 5 minutes.

3.  In a heavy-based pan, heat ghee, then fry the celery, bay leaf and salt; when soft, add rice and stir to coat grains in ghee.

4.  Pour in ¼ cup saffron water and stir. When almost evaporated, add remaining saffron water and bring to a boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, uncovered for 8 – 10 minutes or until the water has evaporated.

5.  Turn off heat, and cover with a tea towel between the lid – set aside undisturbed for further 10 – 15 minutes.

6.  Add coriander, lemon zest, juice and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

28th January 2019

This cake recipe was shared via Kristin, who had received it from our dearest friend Mary. Mary is at the heart of our community, guiding us on this yogic path and as things progress she continues to be a joy-filled light leading the way for us all. I had the privilege of baking this cake with Leela (Mary’s daughter) while visiting Mary and her family in Boulder.

Heartfelt gratitude to Kristin for sharing this recipe with us and thank-you Leela for such an experience of contentment and joy in playful baking together. Such grace!

This cake actually improves with time, this allows the flavours to come together. You can serve it with yoghurt as a simple dessert, or with a cup of kashaya at the end of the meal. It is moist yet light in texture and aromatic with lemon.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

Preparation  – 10 minutes

Baking time –  30 minutes

Serves 8 – 10

ingredients

½ cup/65g whole wheat flour or coconut flour

1½ tsp baking powder

1 cup/170g fine semolina

¼ + 2 Tbsp/75g raw sugar

½ cup/90g coconut oil

¾ cup/180g plain yoghurt

1 lemon, zest and juice

for the syrup

¼ cup/50g sugar

½ cup water

1 lemon, zest and juice

for garnishing

shredded coconut

icing powder

extra lemon zest

prepare the cake

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan lightly with ghee or coconut oil. Set aside.

2.  In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, semolina and sugar, stir to combine – set aside.

3.  In a small pan over low heat, slowly melt the coconut oil, remove from heat and stir in the yoghurt, lemon juice and zest.

4.  Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients – fold together until well combined, then using a spatula, scrape the batter into the greased cake pan and smooth or press down the top.

5.  Bake for about 30 minutes, until lightly golden, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

prepare the syrup

6.  Near the end of the baking time prepare the syrup. Place the sugar and water in a small saucepan and mix well with a wooden spoon, bring the syrup up to the boil, add the lemon juice and zest – simmer gently for 1 minute or until the sugar has dissolved. Remove the syrup from the heat, and set aside until the cake is ready.

finish the cake

7.  Once the cake is cooked, remove it from the oven – set aside to cool.

8.  Use a small, sharp knife to cut the cake down the centre, then 2 parallel lines either side 3 – 4 cm apart, followed by another set of lines at a 45-degree angle, creating a diamond pattern.

9.  Drizzle the syrup evenly over the cake and sprinkle with shredded coconut and icing sugar. Allow the cake to sit a few hours to allow the flavours to mingle.

Goodness shared by Stacey

Baked and assisted by Leela

Artwork by Kristin

lemon rice

15th October 2016

4V7A4788_1980x1297

A delicious recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme. Lemon rice is a simple and tasty dish, it is easily digested and suitable for all constitutions. It can be used daily and throughout all seasons.  Serve with a simple vegetable palya, green salad or with a cucumber raita.

jasmin-balal-circlejasmin-garlandmaking-jasmine

Beautiful India

Mallige – Jasmine flower, Mysore 

4V7A4809_1_1980x1297

Lemon Rice (Chitraanna)

Serves 3 – 4

Channa and urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store, when briefly fried in the oil they add a lovely crunch to the dish.  The fresh curry leaves when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months – they have wonderful medicinal qualities. 

Use heaped when measurements except stated otherwise.

ingredients 

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups/500ml water

1 large carrot – 150g

2 tsp ginger, grated 

½ cup/40g dried unsweetened shredded coconut

1 tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp sugar/jaggery

1 -2 Tbsp lemon juice

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane

¼ cup peanut/melted coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

2 tsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dal 

1 medium, mild dried red chilli

10 raw cashew nuts

1 tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

prepare the rice

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and pour in water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer.  Do not cover the pot with a lid, as this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

2.  While waiting for the rice to cool, grate the carrot – measuring 1 cup, grate the ginger, chop the coriander, cut the chilli into 3-4 pieces, halve the cashews. Set aside.

prepare the voggarne

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splatter and pop, add the channa and urad dal – fry for a few seconds, then add the chilli, cashews, and cumin seeds – fry until channa dal is golden in colour. Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder – continue to fry for a few seconds.  

4.  Stir in the grated carrot, ginger, coconut, salt, jaggery and lemon juice – cook for 6 minutes, until all ingredients have combined and the carrot is soft. Turn off the heat.

4V7A4749_1980x1297

5.  Add the cooled rice and coriander and using the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices. Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery or lemon.  Serve immediately.  

Lemon rice can be served with raita, plain yoghurt or accompanied with a vegetable palya.

variation

  • replace the carrot with finely chopped red pepper and cabbage.

4V7A4794_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

barley salad with roasted-spiced fennel & carrot

3rd April 2016

4V7A2409_1920x1297

The plum trees are blossoming. Spring has arrived.

4V7A2456_1980x12974V7A2411_1980x12974V7A2456_1980x1297

A delightful spring salad with substance.

4V7A2985_1980x1297

barley salad with roasted spiced fennel & carrot

Serves 4 -6

A perfect salad for the early weeks of spring when the days are still cool and the season´s beautiful ingredients are starting to trickle in.  I love the chewy, nutty texture of the cooked barley, the satisfying sweetness brought out from the roasted vegetables and the earthy spices that bring it all together.  It is lovely served with a bowl of guacamole or creamy hummus and this beetroot salad.

for the salad 

2 cups barley, cooked (see lemon barley water)

3 medium fennel bulbs

5 medium carrots

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 heaped tsp coriander seeds

1 tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp cinnamon powder

tsp chilli flakes or chilli powder

2 Tbsp ghee/oil

⅓ cup fresh roughly torn mint leaves

⅓ cup finely chopped fennel fronds

for the citrus dressing 

zest from one lemon

zest of one orange

3 Tbsp lemon juice

2 Tbsp orange juice

3 Tbsp olive oil

2 Tbsp sweetener, honey, agave, or maple syrup

¼ heaped tsp salt

preparation

1.  Preheat the oven 405 degrees F/210C. Line a baking tray with parchment paper and set aside.

2.  Prepare the barley, following these directions and keeping the water to make a luscious barley lemonade.

3.  Wash the fennel, trim the fennel stalks and fronds (save for the salad), remove the tougher ends and outer layer – cut into small slices.  Wash carrots, peel and cut into medium chunks.  Set aside.

4.  Dry roast the cumin and coriander seeds in a small pan, when lightly toasted turn off the heat and grind to a rough powder with a mortar and pestle.  Add the cinnamon, turmeric, paprika and salt. Stir to combine.

4V7A2967_1980x1297

5.  Spread the vegetables out in one layer on the baking tray, lined with baking paper, drizzle over the ghee and sprinkle over the spice mix, toss the vegetables until they are well coated.

4V7A2974_1980x1297

6.  Place the tray in the oven and roast for about 30 minutes, or until vegetable are browning. Remove from oven and set aside to cool.

make the citrus dressing 

7.  Combine all the ingredient in a bowl and whisk to combine; set aside.

assemble the salad 

8.  Place the cooked barley in a large salad bowl, pour over the dressing ingredients and allow to marinate for 15 – 30 minutes.

9.  Once sufficiently marinated add to the bowl, the roasted vegetables, fresh mint leaves and fennel fronds.  Toss to combine, season with more salt, and a few rounds of freshly ground pepper.

4V7A2457_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

lemon barley water

27th March 2016

barley water table

Barley has a cooling thermal nature; sweet and astringent in taste.  Traditionally given to calm sore stomachs.

4V7A2718_1980x12974V7A2706_1980x12974V7A2711_1980x1297

-Marguerite daisy, also known as the Argyranthemum frutescens

barley water closeup

lemon barley water

Makes 5 – 6 cups

Recipe adapted from Spring.

Lovely soothing, yet thirst-quenching, drink.  You can add other flavourings to it besides lemon and honey – lemon verbena or ginger would work well.  Don’t discard the cooked barley.  Recipe to follow, stir it through this tomato soup, or dress it simply with a little olive oil and lemon juice and add to a salad.

ingredients 

1 cup /200g pearl barley

10 cups/2.5 litres filtered water

3 – 4 Tbsp light-flavoured honey

3  Tbsp lemon juice, or more to taste

preparation 

1.  In a large saucepan rinse the barley until the water runs clear, drain, pour in the water, bring to boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook uncovered until the barley is tender, this will take about 35 – 40 minutes.

2.  Strain, reserving the cooking water and set the barley aside.

3. Run the barley water through a thinner strainer into a pouring jug, set aside to cool before adding the honey, stirring until dissolved.

4.  Add the lemon juice, taste, adding more honey or lemon as needed.

barleywater closeup

Goodness shared by Stacey

sprouted moong coconut lemon palya

8th March 2016

4V7A1819_1980x1297

I made this last weekend for a relaxed lunch with family and friends.  It was served with fermented Indian dosasspicy chickpea sambar, carrot palya and a bowl of sliced avocados with arugula leaves and mustard micro-greens.  After a last minute panic, thinking this may not be enough, I had moong dal sprouts waiting to be used.  Initially, I had soaked them for fermented moong bean pancakes but had not got around to grinding them, so they ended up as sprouts waiting for a purpose.

4V7A1840_1980x1297IMG_1786_1980x1297 4V7A1895_1_1980x1297

-sweet winter plum tree. In Summer, it is laden with fruit that is brilliant in colour.

-went outside to find her – soft and silent when she is out of the water.

-slate skies, frosty mornings and fingers tingling.

4V7A1814_1980x1297

sprouted moong dal coconut lemon palya

Serves 4

Any left-overs from the fresh coconut can be kept in the freezer, otherwise, it tends to go off before it can be used.  If you are unable to obtain fresh coconut, replace with ¾ cup unsweetened, dried, shredded coconut.  The urad and chana dal add a nice crunch, however, if you are unfamiliar with these, they can be omitted and replaced with roughly chopped cashews or almonds, frying them until golden.  The secret to getting this simple palya just right is to saute the sprouts very minimally so that they are just slightly soft, but still, retain their freshness and are not overcooked.

During colder seasons, sprouts act as an excellent source of fresh vegetables.  Cooking them at this time of year balances their cooling nature. When lightly steaming or sautéing, they still keep their vital and energizing qualities. 

ingredients 

2½ cups sprouted whole moong dal (whole mung beans)

1½ cups freshly grated coconut

1 Tbsp oil/ghee

1 heaped tsp urad dal

1 heaped tsp channa dal

½ tsp cumin seeds

10 curry leaves

zest from a lemon

juice from a lemon

1 cup chopped coriander

salt and pepper, to taste

pre-preparation

1.  For sprouting, follow the directions here, using 1 cup whole moong dal. After an overnight soak, the sprouts are ready in just two-three days.

preparation

2. Grate the fresh coconut into fine shreds until you have 1½ cups.  Set aside.

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the ghee/oil and urad and channa dal, fry until both dals are golden-brown, then add cumin seeds and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds. Add in the sprouts and saute for a few minutes, stirring to keep the sprouts moving.

4.  Add the grated coconut and saute for 2 more minutes, or until the sprouts are slightly wilted, but still hold their shape.

5.  Transfer to a medium-sized serving bowl and mix in the lemon zest, lemon juice, coriander and season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

6.  Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more lemon or salt as needed.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

4V7A1827_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

carrot moong dal soup – a winter warming soup

6th December 2015

I thought I would re-visit this soup, as it is one I make most often in the colder months and a particular favourite of Donna’s.  It is also very quick and easy to prepare and has such simple flavours and warmth due to the pepper and ginger, keeping us nourished and grounded in these colder months.  Dry roasting and roughly grinding your own spices make all the difference to bring out the flavours, don’t be tempted to skip this process.

Out of all the pulses, moong dal (green gram) is one I use most often; as it has a calming, cooling and balancing effect on all dosha’s.  It is also very cleansing and medicinal.  The tomatoes can easily be omitted if desired; as the lemon juice adds the acidity that this soup requires.

A few memorable images from our recent retreat in India.

4V7A9074_1980x1297banyan tree cloudscapeholy water tap

– Sri Ramana Maharshi Ashram

– Banyan Tree, Firefly Resort

– Illuminating cloudscape

4V7A9740_1980x1297

carrot moong dal soup

The original recipe is from Yamuna Devi’s, The Vegetable Table.  It is a little worn and splotched on most pages from over-enthusiastic use.  A great book to start with when wanting to cook good, wholesome Indian meals without the addition of onion or garlic.  There is also a sense of devotional cooking in all the recipes which I really like.

This is my version of her soup with a few changes.  The original recipe uses split moong dal (yellow) which results in a lighter soup. I particularly prefer using the whole moong for a heartier Winter soup.

Serves 4

Preparation – 45 mins

ingredients 

1 cup whole moong dal

8 cups water

4 medium carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

3 whole cardamom pods (peeled and seeds crushed)

1-inch piece fresh ginger, finely chopped

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp whole coriander seeds

1 small plum tomato, finely chopped

¼ cup coriander leaves, finely chopped

2 Tbsp lemon juice, or more to taste

1 tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp freshly ground pepper

voggarane

1 – 2 Tbsp ghee

 tsp asafoetida powder

1 dried chilli, torn in half

6 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

preparation

1.  In a medium pot, wash the dal until it runs clear, drain, refill with water, add the carrots, ginger, and cardamom pods and bring to boil, then reduce to a simmer, partly cover and cook until the dal is soft – 30 – 40 minutes.

2.  In a small pan over moderate heat, dry roast the cumin and coriander seeds until golden and deeply fragrant, allow to cool, then place in a mortar and pestle, and grind into a rough powder.

3.  Add to the dal with the tomatoes, coriander, lemon juice, salt and pepper – turn off the heat.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee, asafoetida powder and chilli – fry for a few seconds, then add the curry leaves and turmeric powder, fry for a few more seconds, remove from heat and pour into the soup.  

5. Taste, adding more salt or lemon if needed.  I find the lemon juice and freshly ground pepper bring this soup together, so you may want to add more.  Drizzle with a spoon of melted ghee when serving.

Serve with your favourite bread toasted and a bowl of guacamole, or if trying to avoid bread make a pot of red rice or quinoa and serve a spoon in each bowl of soup.

Goodness shared from Stacey

green lemonade

13th July 2013

P1050786

Sometimes inspiration comes…

In the form of a slow walk around the garden.  At first glance, it all seems to blur into a whole lot of greenery, but then something lets go and releases.  My breathing slows…..my pace slows…..my head clears…..my heart softens and I am surrounded by the rhythmic breath of the trees.  I allow the green and light to soak in and I begin to notice the infinite beauty all around….gratitude and appreciation goes out.

P1050711

P1050714

The benefits of juicing –

(Wild about Greens – Nava Atlas)

Juices give you an instant energy boost.  When you drink freshly made juices, you are getting the energy right away without waiting for your body to digest it.  This has an immediately emerging effect.

Even without all of the fibre contained in smoothies, juices are a great way to flush out your system and to cleanse your body.

Fresh juices are a shortcut to pure nutrition.  A freshly made juice bypasses the need to digest the fibres before you get all the nutrients of the fruits and vegetables.  This is ideal for people who have digestion problems and need to heal themselves before they can absorb nutrients from whole foods.

Drinking juice adds more nutrition to your day without making you feel as if you’ve just eaten a whole meal.

green lemonade

Serves 2

ingredients 

2 handfuls spinach, kale or chard, including stems

½ lemon, peel and all

1 medium cucumber

2 green granny smith apples

preparation 

1. Rinse all ingredients.

2.  Put through a juice machine in the order they appear.

Enjoy immediately!

P1050790

Goodness shared from Stacey

green smoothie

27th February 2013

P1040994

What makes this green smoothie so good is the wide spectrum of amino acids, minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, chlorophyll, fibre and enzymes that will give your body the health, energy and strength it needs. The blending helps breaks down the cellular walls of the leafy greens, enabling our bodies to assimilate all these nutrients.

I try to not use the same leafy greens every day, rotating the greens daily or every few days.  Mixing up your leafy greens will ensure that you are rounding out all the different vitamins each green carries. Plus, each different leafy green contains small amounts of alkaloids, so when you switch them often, you are giving your body a chance to work on the different alkaloids equally.

P1050017

P1050041

P1050035

Rotate your leafy greens according to the family.

Crucifers:  kale, collard, arugula (rocket), cabbage, bok choy, radish greens, mustard greens, broccoli

Amaranth:  spinach, chard, beets

Asteraceae: dandelions, leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce

Apiaceae: parsley, cilantro, anise, celery, chervil, dill, fennel, parsnip

Poaceae: wheatgrass

P1050001

green smoothie

Serves 4 large glasses

This recipe originated from Anna.   When I lived in Israel, I would receive a call most mornings to say that my smoothie was ready and waiting for me. The green smoothie was a distant memory until I found the recipe tucked away giving it life again.  I believe it came from Donna, who on one of her trips to Israel, went around one morning to Anna’s kitchen to learn the secrets of the green smoothie and came back with this delicious recipe.  We have been enjoying the green smoothie in the afternoon, when the children get back from school, needing a pick-me-up.   

I use my Vitamix blender as it has a very powerful blade.  If using a normal blender, I would peel the lemon and apple.  There are so many recipes out there, and there are limitless possibilities.  This one is my favourite combinations.

ingredients 

1 large green apple, quartered and cored

2 large Medjool dates, pitted

2 Tbsp dried unsweetened cranberries

½ lemon, peel and all

1-inch chunk ginger, chopped

½ avocado and/or ½ banana

a handful of sunflower sprouts or mung beans sprout

small bunch of parsley

a generous mix of greens (spinach, kale, rocket, chard, lettuce or radish leaves, arugula,….)

1½ cups almond milk   or nut milk of your choice (nut milk in the carton is pasteurised to keep the shelf life long, so therefore it has little nutrients.  It is much better to make your own)

1 cup unsweetened apple juice

preparation 

1.  Place all the ingredients in the blender. The blender will be quite full.

2.  Blend until creamy and smooth.

3.  Pour into glasses and enjoy!

P1050065

Goodness shared from Stacey

All rights reserved © Goodness is…. · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie