kale

warm salad of roasted carrot, cauliflower, dal & mustard

10th January 2017

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So good to have my site back.  It had disappeared for 10 days – having it back was like having the comfort of an old friend.

We just came back from a holiday with my husband’s family travelling through parts of Kerala in the South of India.  We started in Cochin, staying in a lovely place called The Eight Bastion in Fort Kochi, where the food was exceptional and prepared by a wonderful chef who catered for all our odd dietary needs, taking such pride, care and enthusiasm in everything he prepared.  We saw the Chinese fishing nets and visited a few local churches and a Synagogue – in the heart of Fort Kochi. We then travelled high up into the hill stations of Munnar staying at a lovely resort called ‘The Spice Tree”, where we were literally up in the clouds.

We went on hikes through the plantations and saw all sorts of spices grown – peppercorns, cardamom, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and even had a go at cutting and harvesting rice. The evening sunset walks were particularly special, enjoying the breath-taking views down into the valley.  The last part of our trip was exploring the backwaters. We spent a day on one of the typical house-boats made of teak and bamboo – observing how the local people lived on the water, using the river to bathe, to wash their clothes and dishes, as a source of food and transport and everything in between.  We watched palm tree after palm tree pass us by, paddy fields and colourful houses and a romantic way of life that seems unchanged for centuries.  This is the beauty of Kerala.

For the last 25 years, we have been travelling to India, and this was the first time as a tourist, rather than a budding yoga practitioner.  India as always, presented her magic and opened all our hearts – it was a truly memorable and magical trip.

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~ Chinese fishing nets in a bright sky at Fort Cochin

~ Tea Plantations taken from the bus window at the end of a winding, five-hour journey, Munnar

~ Domestic chores along the river, Kumarakom

~ Water, vegetation and sky all become one, Backwaters

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a warm salad of roasted carrot cauliflower, dal & mustard

Recipe slightly adapted from Grown and Gathered.

Don’t be shy with the kale greens, just make it green and lots of it.  I love how the carrot adds a splash of colour; roasted beets would also work.  I serve it with a whole avocado, sliced and spread into a fan, and slices of grilled halloumi. It is also great with a bowl of hummus.  A welcomed dish to take along to a lunch or dinner.

Serves 4, as a side dish or 2 as a main.

ingredients 

400g carrots or Baby (Dutch) tops trimmed to 2cm

½ head/400g cauliflower

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)

3 cups water

120g kale, mustard greens, chard, spinach, coarsely chopped

mustard dressing 

1 Tbsp yellow mustard seeds

2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp brown sugar/jaggery/honey

zest from two lemons

vinaigrette 

2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

4 Tbsp lemon juice (1 large lemon)

½ tsp fine rock salt

⅛ tsp ground black pepper

1 Tbsp honey/sugar (optional)

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 190 C/ 375F.

2.  Cut the cauliflower into rough 4 cm florets, and peel the carrots and cut into matchsticks, about 5 cm in length and place in a large bowl – set aside.

3. In a mortar and pestle, grind the mustard seeds until about half are ground and half are cracked; add the remaining dressing ingredients and continue to grind gently until combined.

4.  Pour the dressing over the cauliflower and carrot and toss, using your hands until thoroughly combined.

5. Spread the vegetables out on a baking tray in a single layer and roast for 45min – 1 hour, or until the vegetables are just beginning to blacken around the edges.

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6.  Wash the dal and place in a saucepan with the water, bring to a rapid simmer and leave, uncovered until they are tender – about 20 – 30 minutes. Just keep in mind you may have to add more water when cooking – depending on the quality of your dal. You really need to keep an eye on them and judge so that you are not left with mush. You want the dal firm, but cooked. When ready, pour into a strainer to drain off any excess water – leave for a few minutes.

7.  Prepare the vinaigrette – place the oil, lemon juice, zest, honey, salt and pepper in a jar. Seal with a lid and shake well.  Set aside.

8.  Remove the stem from the kale, mustard and chard, and roughly chop, then lightly saute in a skillet, turn off the heat and cover for a few minutes until just wilted.

9.  Place in a large salad bowl, pour over the vinaigrette, add the cooked dal and toss gently.  The heat from the dal will help soften the leaves even more – set aside for the flavours to come together while the vegetables are still roasting.

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10.  When the vegetables are ready, add them to the marinated greens and dal and gently combine. Garnish the top with a large avocado, sliced and spread out into a fan, then add a few good rounds of freshly ground pepper and serve immediately.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

celebration salad

20th September 2015

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A celebration of wonderful abundance from the garden using freshly picked kale leaves, the first of the walnuts from a tree I didn’t know we had, and the last of those pears.

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pomegranite
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celebration salad

Celebration salad adapted from ‘Vibrant Food’.

This salad is best eaten on its own, as the kale is surprisingly satisfying and hearty.  This way you also get to enjoy the joyous flavours, surprises and celebration of textures.  If you don’t have kale available, swiss chard or spinach can be used.  Because I have trouble digesting too much ‘raw’ in the cabbage family, I like to steam the kale very, very briefly.  There is also an option of eating it raw using a light massaging technique to break down the cell walls.

serves 4 – 6

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for the salad 

½ cup walnuts

6 – 8  cups of young leaves Nero Tuscan Kale

1 Tbsp maple syrup

½ cup purple cabbage, finely chopped

1 small pear, slightly under-ripe, cored and thinly sliced lengthwise

½ cup pomegranate seeds

zest from one lemon

for the dressing

5 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

2 Tbsp sweet balsamic vinegar

2 Tbsp lemon juice

fine rock salt and freshly ground pepper

preparation

1.  Pre-heat oven to 350F/180C.

2.  Arrange the walnuts in a single layer on a baking sheet and drizzle with maple syrup.  Toast until golden brown and fragrant, about 8 – 10 minutes. Set aside to cool for about 5 minutes, then coarsely chop.

3.  Wash the young kale leaves and remove the inner stem of the bigger leaves.  Bring a pot of water to the boil, salt it lightly and plunge the kale gently in for 15 – 30 seconds, retaining its vigour and crispness.  Drain, pour cold water over and set aside to cool.  Spin to remove excess water. Slice into ribbons.  If picking fresh from the garden, I like to add the smaller delicate leaves, keeping them whole.

If you prefer your kale leaves raw – In a large mixing bowl, toss and gently massage the chopped kale with 2 tablespoons of lemon juice and a drizzle of olive oil.  Set aside, tossing by hand every ten minutes, for about 30 minutes.

4.  Discard any limp outer leaves from the cabbage and shred finely until you have half a cup – set aside.

5.  Slice the pear into quarters, remove the core, then cut the fruit into thin slices.  Brush each piece with lemon juice, to stop browning.

6.  Prepare the dressing, whisk together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

7.  In a large salad bowl, combine the finely chopped cabbage and kale – toss with your hands to combine. Scatter the walnuts, pear slices, and pomegranate seeds over the top of the salad. Sprinkle over the lemon zest.  Dress the salad when ready to serve.

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With a new Jewish year just passed – I wish each and everyone success on their inner journey – a spark of golden light to be nurtured and glowing – may it grow brighter and brighter.

Goodness shared by Stacey

ribollita

30th December 2012

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listen carefully

to

your

body and mind

and you will always

hear

it

speak.

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ribollita

Many, many versions of this soup.  My version replaces the bread with whole barley, red or wild rice. Traditionally, ribollita uses Cavelo Nero kale – a beautiful black cabbage.  I use a combination of savoy cabbage and kale. 

Allow this dish to guide you.  Patience, gentle and respectful cooking results in a dish that is more flavourful and it calms and soothes the mind and emotions while renewing the body.

Serves 4, with second helpings.

ingredients 

1 cup dried cannellini beans\chickpeas, soaked overnight  (keep pre-soaked beans in the freezer ready to use)

3 Tbsp oil/ghee

½ dried chilli, crumbled

small handful fresh sage

5 cm sprig fresh rosemary

2 sprigs lemon thyme

2 bay leaves

2 sticks celery, chopped

2 medium carrots, chopped

1 potato, diced

1 small white cabbage, shredded

¼ cup barley, rinsed

8 cups water/vegetable stock

1 cup cherry tomatoes, finely chopped  (or tin good-quality peeled tomatoes)

2 Tbsp tomato paste

bunch of Cavelo Nero kale, thick stalks removed, roughly chopped

rock salt and freshly ground black pepper

extra virgin olive oil, to serve

preparation 

1.  Drain the beans and place them in a heavy-based saucepan.  Generously cover with water, and simmer, uncovered over low heat for 1 hour.

Meanwhile..

2.  Heat ghee/oil in a large cooking pot over low heat, add the dried chilli, bay leaves, fresh sage, rosemary and thyme – cook for a couple of minutes to allow the flavours to open up.

3.  Add celery, carrots, potato, and barley/rice – cook for a couple of minutes, then add the cabbage, tomatoes, tomato paste and vegetable stock, cover and simmer over low heat for 20 minutes.

4.  Stir in the beans/chickpeas, cover and cook for 1 hour or more, adding water if needed until the vegetables and beans are soft.

5.  Add a generous pinch of salt and a few good grindings of black pepper. Remove from heat and allow to sit for 1 hour to improve the flavours.  Reheat and stir in the kale.

Ladle into warm bowls and generously drizzle with a bright green, rich, peppery olive oil.

slow down and savour this dish

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 Goodness shared from Stacey

sweet potato, carrot & kale palya

21st January 2010

Palya is a Kannada (South Indian language) word for a dry side dish made with any vegetable or a combination of.  Palya is usually cooked in a dry heat which brings out the flavour of the vegetables; when the natural sugars in the vegetables caramelize and the flavour is concentrated. Small pieces of uniformly cut vegetables – julienne thick or thin, diced, finely shredded, or in thin diagonal slices – are sautéed in a little ghee or oil in a heavy-bottomed pan until they are partially cooked and browned. When using vegetables like sweet potato, potato, beetroot or eggplant, I usually sprinkle them with a little water and cover with a lid, and cook on low heat for 5 mins to soften them.

This is a photo of my sweet potatoes which I dug up the other day. Unfortunately, they look a little worse for wear but their taste is so sweet and delicious. I have had to come up with many dishes to use them in. This palya is a good one!

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These are some of my favourite palya combinations :

– Julienne sliced beetroot, small broccoli leaves and kale

– Julienne sliced carrot, yellow and green beans (I love the vibrant colours of orange, yellow and green)

– Cauliflower, potato and peas (lightly steam the potatoes and cauliflower beforehand)

– Julienne sliced cabbage, crumbled tofu and thinly sliced carrot

– Grated carrot and mung beans (as in the easy sprouting recipe)

– Donna came up with a nice combination of tofu, mung bean sprouts and grated sweet potato which she will share with you at a later date.

I served this with mung beans with Indian spices & lemon and brown rice.

sweet potato, carrot & kale palya

ingredients 

1 Tbsp ghee/peanut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp rasam powder (mildly spiced)

1 small-medium sweet potato, cut into thin Julienne pieces

1 large carrot, cut into thin Julienne pieces

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup dried shredded coconut, or fresh if available

100g kale thinly sliced, – or use any green leaves. I sometimes use a combination of spinach, kale and small broccoli leaves from the garden

salt to taste

fresh coriander leaves, chopped

preparation 

1.  Heat the ghee or oil in a skillet over medium heat, add mustard seeds and fry until they start to splutter and pop, add cumin seeds and when they begin to darken, add the rasam powder – fry for a few seconds.

2.  Add carrot and sweet potato, mix well until the vegetables are well coated, cover with a lid and simmer for 10 mins, stirring often over low heat or until the sweet potato softens.  If you feel the mixture is too dry, you can sprinkle it lightly with a little water.

3.  When soft, add the jaggery and coconut, mixing well.

4.  Add the kale and continue cooking on low heat for a few minutes, stirring often, turn off heat and leave covered for 10 mins, or until the kale has wilted.

5.  Add the coriander and salt to taste.

Enjoy!

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Shared goodness from Stacey

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