ginger

pear ginger macadamia muffins (vegan & gluten free)

11th December 2019

For this recipe, I used Amy Chaplins gluten-free muffin base recipe from her new book ‘Whole Food Cooking Every Day’ and combined it with two of my favourite recipes – Peach Ginger Muffins and Pear Ginger Cornmeal Cake.

She goes on to say, “I discovered textural magic (and a gorgeous golden crumb) with a combination of millet flour, oat flour and almond flour. These flours, along with plenty of ground flax seeds, becomes a winning base from which an endless number of variations have stemmed.”

~marigold~

There are four parts to this recipe, the pear topping, the wet ingredients, dry ingredients, and macadamia crumb – once these four parts are assembled and ready, the muffins come together easily. I used the variation option (see below) in this photo and cut the pear into cubes, adding a ¼ cup into the batter and remaining on top.

pear ginger macadamia muffins

To make the different flours, place separately and in small quantities, whole millet, almond and oats in your high-speed blender and grind to a flour. Make in bigger amounts and store in the freezer.

Preparation – 20 minutes.

Baking – 35 minutes.

Makes 10 -12 muffins, depending on the size of your muffin cups.

pear topping

2 small/165g pears (the smaller fit nicely on top)

1 Tbsp coconut oil

1 Tbsp maple syrup/coconut sugar

1 heaped tsp grated ginger

macadamia crumb

½ cup/70g macadamia nuts, roughly chopped

2 Tbsp coconut sugar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

cake

¼ cup/22g ground flax seeds

1 cup/225g almond milk

⅓ cup/70g melted coconut oil

¼ cup/75g pure maple syrup or coconut sugar

¼ cup/75g orange juice, freshly squeezed

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 small/80g pear, grated (skin and all)

2 heaped Tbsp/25g crystallized ginger, finely chopped 

2 Tbsp freshly grated ginger

~

1 cup/130g millet flour

½ cup/45g oat flour (gluten-free)

½ cup/45g almond flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

preparation

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Line a standard muffin pan with 10- 12 paper liners and set aside. 

2. In a medium bowl, combine the ground flax seeds and almond milk from the cake ingredients, whisk to combine and set aside while you prepare the pear topping.

pear topping

3.  Halve the pears, remove the seeds, cut into quarters and then each quarter into three slices about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.

4.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil, sugar and ginger, melt the mixture, stirring gently to combine. Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes, then add the pears, toss the pears to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

macadamia crumb

5. In a small bowl, place the macadamias nuts, sugar and maple syrup, stir to combine – set aside.

cake

6.  To the flax mixture, add the coconut oil, maple syrup, orange juice, vanilla, salt, grated pear, ginger and crystallized ginger.

7.  In another bowl, combine the millet flour, oat flour, almond flour and baking powder, breaking up any clumps of almond flour, using a spatula stir the wet ingredients into the dry until combined, then spoon the batter into the muffin cups filling them three-quarters full.

8.  Toss the pears to coat them with the pear juices and lay 2 – 3 slices over each of the muffins. Spoon any extra juices over the muffins.

9.  With your fingers, crumble the macadamia crumb on top of each muffin.

10.  Bake for 35 – 40 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the centre of a muffin comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow the muffins to sit for 5 minutes before transferring them to a wire rack to cool. Allow to cool completely before serving, this allows the structure to set resulting in a tender crumb.

Note:

  • If melted coconut oil is added to cold ingredients, it will clump and harden. If wet ingredients are cold, not at room temperature, don’t add the coconut oil until right before combining the wet and dry ingredients.

Variation:

  • For extra sweetness, replace the orange juice with maple syrup or coconut sugar.
  • Chop the pears into cubes instead of slivers, add ¼ cup/90g into the batter and the remaining on top.

ginger peach muffins (vegan)

24th July 2018

New MOON dip.

“The leaves of the lotus are emergent, meaning that they rise above the water level whereas the leaves of water-lily are found floating on the water surface. Same is true for their respective flowers; lotus flowers are emergent and water-lily flowers are floating.”

Monserrate Pond, Sintra

ginger peach muffins

Makes 12 muffins

Adapted from ‘Good to the Grain’ by Kim Boyce.

‘Ripe peaches, cooked briefly in ginger syrup, are spooned over muffins made with soft, mellow oat flour and minced candied ginger. Be sure to use peaches that are slightly tart and not so ripe that they’ll break apart in the pan. Allow time for the muffins to cool before eating, as the oat flour can be moist when warm’. – Kim Boyce. 

ingredients

2 Tbsp chia seeds

½ cup nut milk (almond, rice etc.)

peach topping 

2 medium/310g firm, ripe peaches

1 Tbsp ghee/coconut oil

2 Tbsp brown sugar/maple syrup

1 heaped tsp freshly grated ginger

dry ingredients 

¾ cup/75g oat flour

¾ cup/100g whole wheat flour

¾ cup/100g unbleached white flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

¼ cup/50g light brown fine sugar

½ cup/75g dark brown sugar

¼ tsp fine rock salt

wet ingredients 

¾ cup/185ml nut milk (almond, rice, etc)

 cup/80ml mild-tasting olive/coconut oil

1 Tbsp vanilla essence

2 heaped Tbsp grated ginger

3 Tbsp/35g finely chopped crystallized ginger

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Rub a muffin tin with butter or oil.

2.  Whisk the chia seeds and almond milk together in a medium bowl; set aside for 10 minutes to thicken.

3.  Grate the ginger, you will need 2 heaped tablespoons plus 1 tsp – divided.

for the peach topping

4.  Halve the peaches, remove the seeds, cut into quarters and then each quarter into three slices about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.

5.  In a large skillet over medium heat, add the ghee/oil, sugar and 1 heaped teaspoon grated ginger, melt the mixture, stirring to combine. Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes.

6.  Add the peaches, toss the pan to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

for the cake

7.  Whisk together the oat flour, whole-wheat flour, unbleached white flour, baking powder, sugars and salt in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

8.  In a separate mixing bowl, combine the chia mixture, nut milk, olive oil, vanilla essence, remaining grated ginger and finely chopped crystallized ginger.

9.  Combine the wet and dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix.

10.  Scoop the batter into 12-muffin cups, using a spoon or an ice-cream scoop, fill only a little bit over halfway, as the batter will rise when the peaches are placed on top.

11.  Toss the peaches to coat them with the pan juices and individually lay one slice of peach over each of the muffins, tucking the second slice partway into the batter. Any extra peaches can be served with the muffins. Spoon the pan juices over the muffins.

12.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through. The muffins are ready when they are golden and the edges of the peaches are caramelized. These muffins are best eaten the day they are made.

Serve with a dollop of cream or Greek yoghurt and remaining peaches.

anne’s magical sesame-tahini-ginger dressing

18th February 2018

Our Christmas and New Year were spent up in the beautiful, snowy mountains of Boulder visiting our oldest and dearest friends. As soon as we arrived, a daily ritual was naturally established, of cooking and sharing meals together, morning and evening communed around a big table and warm fire. On these nights, Anne would arrive with a basket of organic salad greens which she would chop up and serve drizzled with this magical tahini dressing.

This dressing is special and adds a delicious splash of flavours to anything you put it on. Whenever I make it, it transports me back to those special evenings shared with like-minded friends.

 anne’s magical sesame-tahini-ginger dressing

Makes about 2 cups

I like to tear up some bitter-tasting leaves from the garden, add a sliced pear and a handful of nuts and seeds and there’s a quick salad or steam some kale leaves, greens beans or broccoli. For a more substantial meal cook up a pot of brown rice, roast some seasonal vegetables and drizzle over this dressing. It is guaranteed to add a bit of magic to any dish.

ingredients

3 Tbsp sesame seeds 

¼ cup white miso

½ cup hulled tahini

1 tsp toasted sesame oil

1 Tbsp honey

½ a lemon zested

juice of ½ a lemon

1-inch grated ginger

2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar

½ tsp flaked dulse (optional)

¼ cup water

¼ – ½ cup olive oil

preparation

1.  In a small saucepan over medium heat, lightly toast the sesame seeds until they start popping, keep toasting for another minute. Remove from heat and set aside for the seeds to cool.

2.  In a medium jar, place the miso and tahini, stir well until pasty and incorporated, stir in the sesame oil and honey.

3.  Remove the zest from half a lemon and squeeze the lemon juice into the jar, add the grated ginger, apple cider vinegar and if using, the dulse flakes. Stir well, adding the water until the dressing comes together.

4.  Add the cooled toasted sesame seeds and pour in the olive oil, whisk until smooth and creamy.

5.  Taste and adjust the seasonings until you have a pleasing balance of fat and acid. The ideal consistency is that of pouring cream; stir in some water, or little more oil, until it runs easily off a spoon.

pear ginger cornmeal cake (vegan)

14th January 2018

Just a few months ago we moved all the Jivana Yoga classes from our living room in the main house to the new ‘Sadvidya Space’ located at the very back of the property.  It is a beautiful, wild, and natural space overlooking the fruit orchard and the vegetable garden. To get there it is quite a journey, entering through a unassuming green door, stepping into and away from the hustle and bustle of old Sintra; you then weave your way past the main house, following the signs that lead along a cobbled stoned path through a lush green forest full of moss, all the while listening to the soft and sweet melody of the birds above.

Already something of yourself has softened and a natural quietness begins to present itself from within. You continue to pass an old chapel canopied under richly, scented eucalyptus trees which loom above, and there you find yourself at a door of the ‘Sadvidya Space’ where one can enter into the warmth and escape the attraction of the external world to travel inwards for a few hours.

I like to think of this journey from the ‘Green Door’ to the ‘Space’ as preparation for our inward practice, helping us to begin to let go along the way.  This is also where I like to test my new recipes and serve them after class to our lovely group on Saturday mornings. This pear and ginger cornmeal cake disappeared quickly!  

´The Sadvidya Space´

pear ginger cornmeal cake

8  servings

The ginger and pear are perfect together and the ginger is subtle enough that it lingers. A very easy dessert for morning or to prepare for a large group.  I like to bake this in a wider baking tray (6.5-inch x 10.5-inch) almost like a slice if using a smaller tray or skillet the cake may need more cooking time.

pear topping 

4 small/370g firm pears

2 Tbsp butter/ghee/coconut oil

2 Tbsp brown sugar

dry ingredients 

1 cup/135g cornmeal

½ cup/75g wholewheat flour

½ cup/75g unbleached white flour

2 tsp baking powder

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 heaped tsp ginger powder

wet ingredients 

¼ cup almond milk

¼ cup olive oil

¾ cup maple syrup (maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup sugar)

2 Tbsp crystallized ginger, finely chopped 

garnishing

2 Tbsp brown sugar

½ cup roughly chopped macadamia nuts

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Line a baking pan or oil a round 8-9 inch cast iron skillet.

2.  Prepare the pear topping, halve the pears, remove the seeds, and slice each half into fours about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the butter and sugar, melt the mixture, stirring to combine – cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes.

4.  Add the pears, toss the pan to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

5.  Prepare the cake, whisk together the cornmeal, flours, baking powder, salt and ginger powder in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

6.  In a separate bowl, combine the nut milk, olive oil, maple syrup, and crystallized ginger.

7.  Combine the wet and dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix, pour into the baking dish or oiled skillet, you may need to spread the batter out with a spatula.

8.  Arrange the pears, toss the pears to coat them with the pan juices and individually lay the pear slices decoratively in even rows over the top of the batter, drizzle with the remaining pan juices. Sprinkle with a little brown sugar and the roughly chopped macadamia nuts.

9.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Serve with a dollop of cream or Greek yoghurt.

Goodness shared by Stacey

barley kichadi

22nd February 2017

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Barley is cooling, sweet, and mildly astringent.  Ideal for decreasing pitta and kapha.  It can improve a sluggish digestion and has a slightly drying effect, helping to clear fluids from the body. Barley is considered one of the “good” carbohydrates.

If the water in which barley is boiled, is given to a person suffering from diarrhoea it gives him instant relief.

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~ evening reflections.

~ Pleopeltis polypodioides, also known as the resurrection fern. The resurrection fern gets its name because it can survive long periods of drought by curling up its fronds, appearing grey-brown and dead. However, when just a little water is present, the fern will uncurl and reopen, appearing to “resurrect” and restoring itself to a vivid green colour within about 24 hours.

~’Chasmanthe floribunda, African cornflag.

~ the outer edges of the wall at the end of the day.

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barley kichadi

preparation 50 minutes

serves 3 – 4

I have been making this weekly, quick and easy with a scoop of thick yoghurt and a drizzling of ghee. It is a wonderful warming, soothing and cleansing meal.  When simmering the dal, simmer until they still hold their shape and before they turn to mush.  I use organic pearl barley in this recipe, if using unhusked barley it will need an overnight soaking and longer cooking time – recommended to boil separately ½ hour before adding the dal.

Our favourite barley recipe is this lovely soothing lemon barley water.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g  pearl barley

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)

8 cups /2-litre water

1 cup/90g celery/fennel, chopped

1 cup/50gcabbage, chopped 

1 heaped teaspoon rock salt 

1 heaped Tbsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

¼ cup/60g frozen green peas

voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli, chopped

10-15 fresh curry leaves, torn in half

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

½ cup fresh coriander, roughly chopped 

2 cups kale/spinach/fenugreek leaves, roughly chopped

to serve 

yoghurt

ghee

preparation 

1.  In a saucepan, wash the barley, until the water runs clear, then pour in 8 cups water, bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer for 10 minutes. Add the dal and simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

2.  Add the celery and cabbage – simmer until barley has softened and the dal is cooked but still holding their shape – approximately 20 – 30 minutes. Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.

3.  Add the peas, salt, jaggery, dried coconut and chopped ginger – simmer for a few minutes, then turn off the heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, and chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly, then pour the voggarane into the kichadi.

6.  Squeeze in the lemon juice, and stir in the coriander and kale. Cover allow to sit 5 minutes, then check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

When ready, drizzle with ghee, garnish with coriander and serve with a spoon of yoghurt.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

healing vegetable broth & a morning nature walk

18th January 2015

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My walks these last few mornings have been under a slow, fuzzy, fizzling, drizzle of rain, cocooned warm and safe inside my jacket and hood. Yesterday, it was particularly magical as I walked the familiar windy, cobbled stone road, in a thick blanket of fog which imparted a feeling of magic, mystery and wonder. Today my walk was different again, it cleared, less windy, still cloudy except for a small patch of blue sky above. The colours were so clean and vibrant and below my feet walked on wet leaves.

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healing vegetable broth

Inspired

A root and sea vegetable broth to boost your immune system, strengthen your kidneys and create an alkaline, mineral-rich drink to replenish your cells and to give a rest to your digestion.  I make it early morning to drink as a simple cleanse throughout the day.

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ingredients 

cup moong dal

4 sticks celery

1 medium fennel bulb and fronds

1 handful string beans

2 – 4 carrots, coarsely chopped

2 zucchini, coarsely chopped

1 small sweet potato, coarsely chopped

1 strip kombu (sea vegetable)

1-inch knob ginger, cut into slices

2-litres filter water

1 bunch parsley

1 bunch coriander

juice of half lemon

freshly ground pepper

preparation 

1.  All vegetables should be organic and as fresh as possible.  Thoroughly wash, but do not peel the vegetables.  Cut them into large chunks and place in a heavy-bottomed pot with the stick of kombu and ginger slices.

2.  Cover with filtered clean water and simmer for 2 – 4 hours.  The longer you cook the broth, the richer and more flavourful it will be.  10 minutes before turning off the heat, tie the bunches of parsley and coriander together and add to the broth.  This will impart added mineral ions.

3.  Remove the vegetables with a slotted spoon and reserve for other uses.

4.  Strain and season with salt and pepper.  Serve each bowl with a squeeze of lemon, freshly grated ginger and turmeric and enjoy the warm healing replenishment to your body.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

Aytana’s winter warming dal

14th December 2014

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When we hold workshops, we host up to 12 people staying in our home and up to 16 – 20 for dinner, I draw up a timetable/roster and everyone signs up for their turn at cooking, cleaning, lighting the oil burner, refreshing flowers and the general cleanliness of the yoga room over the course of the 10-day seminar. This way all the cooking and stress is evenly distributed, and I also get to enjoy the workshop – but the best part is that I get to be inspired by other amazing cooks and enjoy their creations.

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“What we have learnt is a seed, it will grow to open a new world.”

Aytana’s Winter warming dal

This was a recipe which Aytana made one night – simple, smooth, creamy, quick and delicious. The key here is the blending/whisking of the dal at the end to create the soothing creaminess and the stewing of the tomatoes at the beginning. It is easy to digest and the light consistency makes it appealing in all seasons.  Depending on the season, I usually serve it with an okra or cabbage palya, a big bowl of steamed green beans and kale, and brown rice. Or in Summer accompanied by a crunchy salad.

Serves 4

ingredients 

1 cup yellow moong dal, split

4 cups water

½ tsp turmeric powder

1 Tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped

for the voggarane

2 tsp ghee/oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 – 7 curry leaves

tsp finely chopped fresh chilli or 1 tsp of rasam powder

tsp asafoetida powder

1 cup ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

1 carrot, finely chopped

1 tsp rock salt

½ cup coriander leaves, roughly chopped 

preparation 

1.  Rinse the dal until the water runs clear, drain and add the ginger, turmeric, and 3 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat – simmer for 30 – 40 minutes or until the dal is soft and has broken down.

prepare the voggarane

2.  While the dal is cooking, in a small saucepan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the cumin seeds and fry until they brown.

3.  Add asafoetida powder, curry leaves, chilli and fry for 20 seconds.

4.  Stir in the tomatoes and carrots, cover and allow the tomatoes to stew for 20 minutes, then add the cooked dal – simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5.  Remove from heat and add salt, then beat with a wire whisk or using a hand blender, blend until smooth and creamy.

6.  Add coriander and stir to combine.  Garnish each portion with a twist of lemon and drizzling of ghee.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

vegetable barley ginger soup with lemon thyme

7th December 2014

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A soup to warm your hands and to strengthen your courage…

We can do anything if we sit with intention, just holding it in our thoughts, our hearts and lifting it up with LOVE, LIGHT, JOY, PEACE and COURAGE.

There are no limits to what we can do…..try it!

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vegetable barley ginger soup with lemon thyme

Serves 4 – 6

Inspired by Noa.

If I am out of home-made vegetable stock, I add the rind end of a wedge of parmesan – it adds a savoury, salty flavour to the soup.  This recipe also called for 4 dried shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced – I tend not to eat mushrooms, so I left them out. But if you like the deep earthy flavour of mushrooms, add them to the soup with the vegetables.

ingredients  

2 Tbsp olive oil

2 stalks/150g celery

3 Tbsp/30g fresh ginger, finely chopped

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 stick of kombu

1 fresh bay leaf

1 medium/300g sweet potato or pumpkin

2 medium/170g carrots

a large wedge cabbage (200g)

⅓ cup/70g whole barley

10 cups/2½ L vegetable stock or water

1 bunch/15g lemon thyme

1 bunch/30g each fresh parsley and dill

Extra parsley, dill and chard/kale

2 tsp rock salt

¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

preparation 

1.  Finely chop the celery, wash and peel the remaining vegetables, then cut into generous chunks so that they do not break up in the cooking.

2.  In a heavy-based saucepan, heat the olive oil, then add the celery, ginger, turmeric, kombu and bay leaf – saute until all are coated.

3.  Add the remaining vegetables, barley and pour in the water so that the vegetables are covered.

4.  Tie up tightly the lemon thyme, parsley and dill and place on top, bring to the boil and turn down the heat  – simmer covered for 1 hour.

5.  Remove the bunch of lemon thyme, parsley and dill and discard.

6.  Add the salt and freshly ground pepper, roughly chop a handful of fresh parsley, dill and chard/kale and stir this into the soup.

7.  Using a potato masher, press down a few times to break up the vegetables – allow to sit for 5 minutes before tasting – adding extra seasoning where needed.

Serve with a drizzling of olive oil and extra cracked pepper.

Goodness shared from Stacey

gentle Indian spiced vegetable stew

4th August 2013

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The weekend brought with it an adventure….the inspiring kind that leaves you refreshed, glowing, inspired and filled with awe and in love with Nature’s Greatness that is.

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Praia da Ursa, Sintra, Portugal

a gentle indian spiced vegetable stew

Serves 3 – 4

This is a very clean, soothing and subtle-tasting dish, warming to the core.  I have been making it quite regularly, sometimes adding a beetroot palya or roasted pumpkin to serve with it.  Inspired ‘The South Indian Yogic Cooking Book.’ 

Channa dal is a split and husked relative of the chickpeas.  Urad dal, rich in protein, is a close relative of the moong dal. Both are found in Indian Stores. 

ingredients 

1 cup green beans, finely chopped

2 carrots

1 zucchini

1 small-medium sweet potato (peeled)

2 stalks celery, finely chopped

4 cups water

ingredients for the ground paste 

1½ tsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dal

½ cup freshly grated coconut or (2 – 3 Tbsp dried coconut)

1 tsp finely chopped fresh ginger

¼ tsp whole black peppercorns

½ tsp jaggery/brown rice

¼ cup chopped fresh coriander

1 tsp fine rock salt

for the voggarane 

1 tsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 -8 fresh curry leaves

preparation 

1.  Finely chop the vegetables into small uniformed pieces.

2.  Bring to boil 4 cups water in a heavy-based saucepan, add the vegetables and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.

to make the ground paste 

3.  Dry-fry the channa and urad dal until golden-brown in colour, then add whole peppercorns, turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly.    

4.  In a high-speed blender, combine the toasted spices, coconut, ginger,  and 1 cup water from the simmered vegetables.  (Do not worry if you accidentally scoop up any vegetables, as I grind these along with the paste as it adds to the creaminess).

5.  Grind until it becomes a relatively smooth puree, then add the puree back into the vegetables, adding broth from the vegetables to clean out the contents of the blender.

6.  Allow to simmer for 5 minutes until the vegetables are tender.

prepare the voggarane 

7.  Heat the ghee in a small pan, add cumin seeds and curry leaves; when the cumin darkens a few shades, pour the voggarane into the vegetables.

8.  Season with salt and finely chopped fresh coriander.  Allow to sit for 15 minutes for the flavours to come through.

Enjoy with brown basmati rice or whole barley and a drizzling of ghee.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

green smoothie

27th February 2013

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What makes this green smoothie so good is the wide spectrum of amino acids, minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, chlorophyll, fibre and enzymes that will give your body the health, energy and strength it needs. The blending helps breaks down the cellular walls of the leafy greens, enabling our bodies to assimilate all these nutrients.

I try to not use the same leafy greens every day, rotating the greens daily or every few days.  Mixing up your leafy greens will ensure that you are rounding out all the different vitamins each green carries. Plus, each different leafy green contains small amounts of alkaloids, so when you switch them often, you are giving your body a chance to work on the different alkaloids equally.

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Rotate your leafy greens according to the family.

Crucifers:  kale, collard, arugula (rocket), cabbage, bok choy, radish greens, mustard greens, broccoli

Amaranth:  spinach, chard, beets

Asteraceae: dandelions, leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce

Apiaceae: parsley, cilantro, anise, celery, chervil, dill, fennel, parsnip

Poaceae: wheatgrass

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green smoothie

Serves 4 large glasses

This recipe originated from Anna.   When I lived in Israel, I would receive a call most mornings to say that my smoothie was ready and waiting for me. The green smoothie was a distant memory until I found the recipe tucked away giving it life again.  I believe it came from Donna, who on one of her trips to Israel, went around one morning to Anna’s kitchen to learn the secrets of the green smoothie and came back with this delicious recipe.  We have been enjoying the green smoothie in the afternoon, when the children get back from school, needing a pick-me-up.   

I use my Vitamix blender as it has a very powerful blade.  If using a normal blender, I would peel the lemon and apple.  There are so many recipes out there, and there are limitless possibilities.  This one is my favourite combinations.

ingredients 

1 large green apple, quartered and cored

2 large Medjool dates, pitted

2 Tbsp dried unsweetened cranberries

½ lemon, peel and all

1-inch chunk ginger, chopped

½ avocado and/or ½ banana

a handful of sunflower sprouts or mung beans sprout

small bunch of parsley

a generous mix of greens (spinach, kale, rocket, chard, lettuce or radish leaves, arugula,….)

1½ cups almond milk   or nut milk of your choice (nut milk in the carton is pasteurised to keep the shelf life long, so therefore it has little nutrients.  It is much better to make your own)

1 cup unsweetened apple juice

preparation 

1.  Place all the ingredients in the blender. The blender will be quite full.

2.  Blend until creamy and smooth.

3.  Pour into glasses and enjoy!

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Goodness shared from Stacey

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