fresh coriander

coriander leaf vānghī bāth

25th August 2016

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We made this dish in the last ‘Introduction to Meditation & Ayurvedic Cooking’ workshop we held in June.  It is a recipe given to us by Gillian, taught to her by our teacher’s wife – the original recipe uses fresh fenugreek leaves which are hard to come by here in Portugal, so the coriander leaves make a lovely alternative.

The Ayurvedic cooking session is taught in the last part of the workshop, so we all get to share in a blessing together and enjoy the meal we have just prepared.  This Coriander Leaf Vanghi Bath with Indian spices and heaps of coriander leaves is superb, and goes perfectly accompanied by a salad of grated carrot; a big bowl of sliced cucumber and various leaves and flowers picked fresh from the garden. Each workshop is very special and as we partake and teach more and more of them, we become open, confident and efficient in the running of them.  Both days were deliciously warm, sunny and still, so we were able to open up the doors and sit outside during the breaks to enjoy the beautiful presence of nature and the warmth of the sun.

Our next workshop is planned for November and is open to register here.

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coriander leaf vānghī bāth

Use heaped spoon measurements, except when stated otherwise.

Preparation – 30 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups/500ml water

3 bunches/155g coriander leaves, chopped

½ cup/40g dried shredded coconut

1 tsp fine rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

1 tsp tamarind paste

2 tsp sambar powder

Voggarane

¼ cup coconut oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

to serve

raw beetroot, fennel salad with ginger lemon dressing

yoghurt

 

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preparation

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and add water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 8-10 minutes, uncovered or until water has evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

2.  While waiting for the rice to cool, wash the coriander leaves, dry and chop (including stems) – measuring 3 tightly packed cups.  Measure out the remaining ingredients – set aside.

prepare the voggarane

3.  In a skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil, add mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the asafoetida, turmeric and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow the spices to fry evenly.

4. Add the coriander leaves, cook for 1 – 2 minutes, then add coconut, salt, jaggery, tamarind paste and sambar powder, and stir for 1 minute, then turn off the heat. 

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5. Add the cooled rice and combine the rice using a wooden spoon or the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices.

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6.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery.  Garnish with a handful of extra fresh coriander leaves and serve with a spoon of ghee.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

toor dal rasam with carrot and sweet peas

15th May 2016

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If I move slowly and in silence and breathe long and deep, I feel my heartbeat slow and my mind clear…

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Crocosmia

– The caress & colours of Spring

– Two friends

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toor dal rasam with carrot & sweet peas

Serves 3 – 4

Rasam keeps the digestive system in good condition.  Apart from strengthening the body, it can be used when omitting the vegetables and diluting with water, as a drink to help with digestive disorders.  People, who are suffering from Vata disturbances, should not consume it very often.   It can also be prepared with split moong dal which will cause fewer disturbances for the Vata constitution.  It may be consumed at any meal-time throughout the day, in all seasons.  Rasam powder and tamarind paste are available at your local Indian Store.  If toor dal (yellow split lentils) are not available replace with split moong dal.

Use heaped measurements except where otherwise stated.

ingredients 

½ cup toor dal or split moong dal

4 cups/1-litre water

1 medium carrot, chopped

⅓ cup fresh green peas

1 tsp rasam powder (mildly spiced)

1 tsp tamarind paste 

2 heaped Tbsp jaggery

1 heaped tsp rock salt

¼ cup dried shredded unsweetened coconut

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane 

2 tsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp fenugreek powder (optional)

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

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preparation

1.   In a saucepan, wash toor dal until the water runs off clear, drain, pour in the water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer, simmer uncovered for 20 minutes.  

2.  Add the carrot and sweet peas and simmer until the dal has softened – 20 minutes.

3.  Add the rasam powder, tamarind, salt, jaggery, and coconut, stir to combine well – simmer for 5 minutes.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop, add asafoetida, fenugreek, curry leaves and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly.

5.  Pour the voggarane into the dal, and stir in the fresh coriander leaves. 

Allow to sit for 10 minutes for the flavours to settle and dal to thicken slightly.  Serve with rice and drizzle with ghee.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

beetroot apple fennel & sesame salad with ginger lemon dressing

22nd April 2013

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We are so happy with the weather right now.  This moment, this burst of green and life and colour, well,  it’s just perfect.

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beetroot, apple, fennel & sesame salad with ginger lemon dressing

If you favour some vegetables more than others, feel free to alter the proportions. The ginger gives it a spicy kick and the toasted sesame seeds add a nutty, earthy crunch.  Served with a favourite grain dish like this one, a spicy avocado green puree or hummus, it makes a perfectly balanced and complete meal.  Not to mention the wonderful cleansing and purifying qualities of beetroot and with the addition of ginger, helps the body rid itself of unwanted toxins and boosts the immune system.

The key to the success of this salad is the right size shavings. Don’t be tempted into using a hand grater as it will produce a sloppier mix which loses its appeal.  Use a mandolin if you have or the largest grate in the food processor or use a knife and cut very, very thin matchstick gratings.

Preparation 20 minutes

Serves 4 

ingredients 

1 tart apple, not peeled

1 Tbsp lemon juice

2 medium beetroot, peeled

1 medium bulb of fennel

1 medium carrot,  peeled

½ cup packed coriander leaves

cup sesame seeds

for the dressing

¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 – 3 Tbsp ginger, finely grated

3 Tbsp olive oil

3 – 4 Tbsp liquid honey/agave

¼ tsp fine rock salt

preparation

1.  Grate or finely chop the apple and stir in 1 Tbsp lemon juice to prevent the apple from browning and place in a medium salad bowl.

2.  Using a mandolin or the coarsest disc on the food processor, grate all the vegetables, starting with the fennel and moving to the carrot. Place in the bowl with the apple.

3.  Grate the beetroot and finely chop the coriander, place into the bowl. Don’t mix just yet.

4.  On medium heat, toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet until they start to pop. Set aside to cool.

5.  Make the dressing, whisk together the lemon juice, ginger, oil, honey and salt together.

6.  When ready to serve, sprinkle over the sesame seeds and pour over the dressing. Gently lifting the grated vegetables to work the colours and distribute the dressing through the salad without over mixing.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

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