chickpeas

green garden salad hummus

23rd January 2014

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I spent the last couple of days transplanting tiny, green, little seedlings of fennel which have self-seeded from the summer blooms; naturally dried, some saved, and some haphazardly sprinkled or wind-carried in all sorts of unusual places throughout the garden. This IS what I LOVE about a garden left to self-seed.  There is always something to be found where you least expect it, or not expect at all.

I love that it makes me get my hands and knees dirty so that I notice all the infinite little beauties all around me.  The wild rocket is popping their heads up everywhere.  I have blankets of small parsley seedlings and more green blankets of coriander seedlings, which make the most delicious addition to green salads.

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This hummus goes very nicely with this beetroot salad and served with these sweetcorn and chard pancakes. A perfect light dinner or lunch.

a wintergreen garden salad hummus

Inspired by a vegetable garden.

It is important for the celery and fennel to be very fresh and finely chopped.

ingredients 

1¼ cups dried chickpeas

tsp bicarbonate soda

½ tsp cumin seeds

½ cup tahini

juice of ½ lemon (approximately 2 Tbsp)

salt to taste

½ cup ice cold water

1 cup celery, finely chopped 

1 cup fennel, finely chopped

big handful finely chopped fresh coriander

2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh dill

rind of one lemon

sprinkling spicy paprika powder

pre-soak

1.  Soak the chickpeas overnight with double their volume in water – the next day, drain and rinse.

preparation

2.  Place the chickpeas and bicarbonate of soda in a saucepan and generously cover with water, bring to a boil, skimming off any foam that comes to the surface – simmer uncovered until the chickpeas are soft, about 1 – 2 hours depending on the type and freshness of your chickpeas.  You will need to add more water as they simmer.  Once done the chickpeas should be quite soft but not mushy – drain and set aside.

3.  Dry roast the cumin seeds in a small pan, when lightly toasted turn off the heat and grind to a powder with a mortar and pestle – set aside.

4.  Transfer the chickpeas to a food processor, run the machine, stopping and scraping down the sides occasionally, until the beans are crumbly.

5.  Pour in the tahini, add the cumin, lemon juice, salt, and blend again until well combined.  With the machine still running, start drizzling in the ice water, so that the hummus starts to become fluffy and aerated.  Depending on the beans you may not use all the water, or you may need more.  Taste and adjust to your own personal taste by adding more tahini, lemon or salt – set aside while preparing the vegetables.

6.  Finely and thinly chop the fennel and few fronds, celery and few leaves, fresh coriander and dill, place in a large shallow bowl and stir in the blended chickpeas.

7.  Combine well, adjust the seasoning, adding more salt or lemon to taste. Glug a good helping of olive oil around the hummus, sprinkle on the lemon rind and hot paprika.  Serve as above or with these crackers, vegetable sticks or in sandwiches.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

chickpea sambar with pumpkin and celery

1st December 2013

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I love Autumn

 and I am taking every opportunity to relish in its rain and

vibrant green,

the early morning dew and it’s amazing,

blazing

colour.

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It is enough. 

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I am enough.

chickpea sambar with pumpkin and celery

When I make this to serve with dosa, I leave out the dal and add another cup of chickpeas, as the lessened water makes it a thick consistency for dosa.

ingredients 

1 cup chickpeas, soaked overnight

½ tsp turmeric powder

1 Tbsp ginger, finely chopped 

1 cup ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

3 cardamom pods

¼ cup moong dal/red lentils, well rinsed

2 stalks celery

2 medium carrots

1 cup pumpkin, finely chopped

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

½ tsp tamarind paste

1 tsp rock salt

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped

sambar-coconut paste

1 – 2 tsp Sambar powder, moderately spiced

¼ cup dried shredded coconut

1 cup water

voggarane

1 Tbsp ghee

1 tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

10 fresh curry leaves

preparation 

1.   Drain the chickpeas and bring them to the boil in a deep pot of water – simmer for a 1 – 2 hours or until soft.

2.  Heat ghee in a heavy-bottomed pot, when hot, add the turmeric, ginger and tomatoes, lightly crush the cardamom pods and stir them in.  Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning – the liquid from the tomatoes keeps everything moist.

3.  Add the dal, celery, carrots, pumpkin and drained chickpeas along with 3 cups water, bring to boil, then turn down heat and simmer uncovered until dal is soft – 20 minutes.

prepare the sambar-coconut paste

4.  Place in a blender, the coconut and sambar powder with 1 cup water, blend into a smooth paste -1 minute.

5.  Add to dal and swish the blender clean using the liquid from the dal.

prepare the voggarane

6.  In a small pan, heat ghee, add the mustard seeds; when they turn grey and pop, add asafoetida, fry for a few seconds then add the curry leaves – fry until fragrant.

7.  Add to sambar, stir in the tamarind paste, jaggery, salt and coriander leaves. Taste, adding more tamarind, jaggery or salt, if needed.

Serve with brown basmati or in winter, whole barley.  Drizzle lavishly with ghee.  Serve with a lemon-dressed green, leafy salad with steamed broccoli and a sprinkling of sesame and pumpkin seeds.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

making hummus in India

24th November 2009

Now I know I promised some delicious Indian dishes when I was in India, but during my stay, I enjoyed someone else making them, rather than me cooking them.  My dear friend Mary, had organised a wonderful Indian lady with a huge smile to cook lunch for us.   We were quite a big group of  6 hungry adults and 4 hungry, very appreciative children.  Each day there was a new dish, more delicious than the next.  Each day there was a soupy dal, rice, two types of vegetable palya (a dry vegetable dish)and either chapati or rice rotti.  The chapati went very well with the hummus.

When packing for India, I packed a very big jar of tahini for the purpose of experimenting with a hummus recipe that was given to me by a few very important experts in this field (thank-you Noa and Tal).  Also, it is one way that I know the children will get a good dose of protein while we are in Mysore, in the South of India.

There are a few secrets to this recipe; one being the addition of bicarbonate of soda for a softer chickpea, good quality traditional tahini, the addition of lightly toasted & ground cumin seeds, and the addition of the ice water to create an aerated, creamy hummus.

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hummus

Makes about 2½ cups

ingredients

1¼ cup dried chickpeas

¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda

½ tsp cumin seeds

½ cup good quality tahini

salt to taste

juice from ½ lemon, approximately 2 Tbsp, plus more if needed

½ cup ice water

¼ tsp hot paprika

pre-soak 

1.  Soak the chickpeas and bicarb of soda overnight with double their volume in water. Drain, rinse and place in a large pot, and generously cover with water, bring to a boil, skimming off any foam that comes to the surface.

2.  Simmer until the chickpeas are soft, about 2 – 3 hours depending on the brand and freshness of your chickpeas. You will need to add more water as they simmer.  Once done, the chickpeas should be quite soft but not mushy – drain and set aside.

prepare the hummus 

3.  Dry roast the cumin seeds in a small pan, when lightly toasted, turn off the heat and grind to a powder in a mortar and pestle.

4.  Measure out 2 cups chickpeas/350g (any remaining chickpeas can be used as garnish) and place in a food processor attached with an S-blade, run the machine, stopping and scraping down the sides occasionally until the beans are crumbly.

5.  Pour in tahini, add ground cumin, lemon juice, salt, and blend again until well combined.  With the machine still running, start drizzling in the ice water, so that the hummus starts to become fluffy and aerated. Depending on the beans you may not use all the water, or you may need more.

6.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes, taste, and adjust to your own personal taste by adding more tahini, lemon, or salt.

7.  To serve, spread the hummus in a shallow bowl, drizzle with olive oil, more lemon juice, and a sprinkling of hot paprika. You could also garnish with toasted black sesame seeds or an assortment of sprouts.

Serve with freshly made chapati or pita bread.

Lately, I have been sautéing on very high heat – red bell peppers, or tiny cauliflower florets or eggplant cubes until slightly charred. Make a well in the center of the hummus with the back of a spoon and filling it with the vegetables of choice.

Shared goodness from Stacey

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