beetroot

beetroot palya

11th April 2019

I prefer to keep this palya simple and the flavours subtle, as it is normally served with other complex dishes. Use fresh, small-medium sized beetroot with lots of flavour and preferably with their greens attached – a reliable sign of freshness. Always give them a squeeze to avoid buying old spongy beetroot that has been stored too long.

~ vegetable garden and blossoms ~

beetroot palya

Preparation – 40 minutes

Serves 4, as a side dish.

ingredients 

4-5 medium/450g beetroot

voggarane 

2 Tbsp peanut oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

15 small curry leaves

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp jaggery

3 Tbsp finely chopped fresh dill

3 Tbsp freshly grated coconut – can replace with dried

to serve 

whole moong dal with garden greens

yoghurt

rice

preparation 

1.  Scrub the beetroot and place in a pot of boiling water – simmer for 30 minutes until tender but still firm.

2.  Drain and allow to cool slightly. Using vinyl gloves (this will keep your hands clean while working with beets) slip the skin off. If the skin doesn’t slip off easily, use a knife to scrape the skin away. Finely chop into small uniformed cubes and place in a serving bowl.

prepare the voggarane 

3.  Heat the oil in a small pan, add the mustard seeds; when they turn grey and pop, remove from heat, add in the curry leaves, swishing the pan around for the leaves to fry evenly. Turn off the heat and allow to cool for 1 – 2 minutes, then stir in the salt and jaggery.

4.  Pour the voggarane over the beetroot – toss until well-incorporated.

5.  Add the finely chopped dill and sprinkle over the coconut – stir to combine. Garnish with a handful of small beetroot leaves.  Serve warm, or at room temperature.

variations 

  • Stir through 1  cup full-fat yoghurt.

suggestions 

  • If buying beets with their greens still attached, lightly steam the greens when boiling the beet, double the voggarane and stir through.

beetroot fennel quinoa pilaf with a leafy lemon garden herb salad

8th May 2014

P1080485

Create an INTENTION to practise conscious eating, connecting to your food with all of your senses and with a grateful attitude.  Here are a few mindful intentions that help to guide me.

Invite a feeling of gratitude and thanks by blessing your food before and after eating.

Nourish yourself by practising silence when eating your food.

Take the intention to always sit down to eat.

Eat only when hungry and drink only when thirsty.

Nutrients are better absorbed when meals are kept simple, not mixing too many different foods together.

Thoroughly chew your food and eat slowly.

Increase awareness and avoid drinking large quantities of liquid, especially cold when eating.

Open your heart by using candles, special dishes, flowers to create beauty around meal-time.

Never eat in an agitated or angry state and always eat in a calm, relaxed, settled and quiet atmosphere.

P1080380P1080474P1080476

beetroot fennel quinoa pilaf

A favourite way of serving this is with a freshly made still warm hummus and a leafy, lemon, garden herb salad. When I am short of time, I put everything into the pot to cook with the quinoa – not as aesthetically looking, but still deliciously tasty. This could be made with rice, barley, millet or any grain of choice.

ingredients 

1 cup quinoa

1½ cups water

1 small fennel bulb

1 medium beetroot

1 medium carrot

for the voggarane

2 tsp ghee

½ heaped tsp cumin seeds

½ heaped tsp coriander seeds

½ tsp pink peppercorns

2 Tbsp small black currants

1 tsp fine rock salt

preparation 

1.  Wash the quinoa and let sit in water for 10 minutes, drain and place in a saucepan with 1½ cups water, bring to boil, turn down the heat and simmer, covered until water has evaporated. (Try to just under-cook the quinoa slightly – it gives a nice texture and nutty bite).  Let sit undisturbed for 15 minutes.

2.  Finely slice the fennel, cut the beetroot and carrot into small uniformed pieces. (Cutting them small allows them to become tender quicker without overcooking the fennel.)

prepare the voggarane

3.  In a mortar and pestle, roughly grind the cumin, coriander and peppercorns – set aside.

4.  Heat ghee in a small pan, add cumin, coriander and peppercorns, saute for 1 minute, then add the fennel, carrot and beetroot – cover and saute on a low heat until just tender, 12 -15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5.  Add currants and quinoa.  With a fork, fluff up the quinoa as you stir to combine, season with salt and garnish with finely chopped fennel fronds.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

P1080473

lemon leafy garden herb salad with a pine nut lemon dressing

for the salad 

a mixture of small garden leaves of parsley, fennel, mustard, spinach, lettuce and coriander

edible garden flowers

1 cucumber, peeled, seeded and sliced

1 avocado, cut into small cubes

for the dressing 

¼ cup pine nuts

1 Tbsp sesame seeds

½ juice of a lemon

pinch of salt

freshly ground pepper

¼ cup cold press olive/flax oil

preparation

1.  In a skillet, dry-roast the pine nuts and sesame seeds until golden, remove from heat and transfer to a bowl to cool, then roughly chop 2 tablespoons and set aside.

2.  In a blender, place the remaining pine nuts with the rest of the ingredients and blend on high for 1 minute.  While blender is running add the oil, blend until thick and creamy and transfer to a jar and set aside.

3.  Gently wash the garden flowers separately, and place on a cloth to dry. Wash and spin the salad leaves and place in a bowl with the cucumber and avocado.

4.  Shake the dressing and drizzle over the salad and lightly toss.  Sprinkle over the lemon rind, pine nuts and edible garden flowers.

Find a quiet place, bless, and enjoy with gratitude.

P1080471

Goodness shared from Stacey

beetroot orange ginger juice

19th December 2011

Inspiration: divine influence; to be filled with spirit.

I find nature to be so wise and inspiring. Our dietary needs vary according to the season.  And if we pay attention to our body’s signals, we will find that the types of foods that bring us satisfaction will be different in the Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring.  At the beginning or midway of a cold Winter season (depending on where you live), we have these sweet, golden fruits hanging from the trees full of vitamin C which is just what is needed at this time of year.  And if I listen to my body carefully, I find my craving for them is strongest when nature has provided them.

In my garden, each season is different and I am rediscovering how natural and rewarding it is to eat different foods to what is available seasonally.  Every day, something a little bit different, inspiring and beautiful emerges.  Among many other things, I have beetroot and an orange tree within 10 metres from my kitchen – nature’s way of creating awareness and inspiration to join them to make such a sweet, fresh cleansing drink.

A perfect welcome when you feel low energy, overwhelmed, or emotional.  A time to pause and take positive steps to renew yourself.

The orange is a great source of vitamin C, vitamin A and flavonoids which helps against infections by supporting your immune system.

The ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory agent that is useful for relieving symptoms associated with arthritis, motion sickness and nausea. Ginger helps the body get rid of toxins, stimulates circulation, boosts your immune system and provides a pleasant “warming” sensation against winter chills.

Beetroot has a very grounding energy, improves your circulation, cleans your body and purifies your blood.  One of the major benefits of beet juice is that it contains a colour pigment called betalain. This is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.  Beetroots are high in folic acid and manganese.  The green leaf is high in vitamin A, C, K as well as calcium and iron.  Vitamin C increases iron absorption, so raw beetroot is a great way to get your daily dose.

What a wonderful way to embrace Winter!

beetroot orange ginger juice

Inspired by this post

Serves 2 glasses

ingredients 

2 small-medium beetroot, roots plus greens – the greens contain most of the healthy minerals and vitamins

4 oranges – peeled

1-inch knob fresh ginger

preparation 

1.  Wash the beetroot and their greens and peel the rind off the oranges.

2.  Push all ingredients through a vegetable juicer.  If you use organic beetroot and ginger, you don’t have to peel them.

3.  Pour it into glasses, stir and serve.

references :

https://www.drweilblog.com/display/Search?searchQuery=ginger&moduleId=3567333&moduleFilter=&categoryFilter=&startAt=0

https://www.thebestofrawfood.com/benefits-of-beet-juice.html

Goodness shared from Stacey

All rights reserved © Goodness is…. · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie