bean palya

green bean palya

11th September 2016

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This is a great dish to make in late August when you have a glut of beans that cannot be picked fast enough and are becoming quite tough and in need of that extra boiling time to soften and bring out the flavour.  The climbing bean would have to be one of my favourite vegetables growing in the garden.  Once they are at their peak they continue to produce at a fast and furious rate.  Here, in Europe I grow the runner beans which have proven to do the best, being most resilient and tough, in this odd unpredictable, misty, Sintra climate.  They also produce the most beautiful flowers of ivory and cream.

Before leaving for our Summer holiday, I planted a second round of climbing beans, planting in hope to extend the season, but alas only two came up, fortunately, I also threw in a bed of very old french beans to clean out my seedbox.  To my surprise all sprouted with robust enthusiasm and are close to picking in two weeks, I just hope the weather stays warm as we edge our way into early Autumn. This is the warmest and driest of summers we have had since arriving in Portugal and the garden is rejoicing in it.

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This dish may be used as a condiment or independently served with rice, chapati or poori.  It strengthens the body, is easily digested and is suitable for all constitutions, daily and throughout all seasons.  For a variation of taste, lemon juice can be added at the end of preparation.  This variation is recommended when eating with rice.

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Green Bean Palya

The chilli, commonly used in South Indian cooking, is Byaadagi chilli and is known for its deep red colour; it is relatively sweet and less spicy.  If unsure about the level of spice of the chilli you are using, leave whole or cut in half.

Preparation 30 minutes

Serves 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme.  

ingredients 

4 cups /420g green beans

1½ cups/375ml  water

1 tsp fine rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

5 Tbsp/30g dried shredded coconut

½ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane

¼ cup/60ml peanut/melted coconut oil

1 tsp black mustard seeds

1 Tbsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dāl 

1 tsp cumin seeds

2 medium, mild dried red chillies, chopped

tsp hingu powder (asafoetida)

½ tsp turmeric powder

20-25 fresh curry leaves

preparation

1.  Wash, top-tail and chop the green beans into small uniformed pieces and measure out the spices for the voggarane – set aside.

prepare the voggarane

2.  In a heavy bottom skillet, over medium heat, pour in oil, add the mustard seeds; when they turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the channa and urad dāl, cumin seeds, chillies and asafoetida – fry until channa and urad dāl have turned golden-brown. Add the turmeric powder and curry leaves – fry for a few seconds.

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3.  Add the beans, water, salt and jaggery – stir to combine and simmer rapidly on medium heat until the beans have softened – 15 minutes.  If wanting more of a firm bean, simmer for less time.

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4.  Turn off the heat and stir in the dried coconut and coriander. 

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5.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes in order to cool slightly and to enhance the flavours.  Taste, adding more salt or jaggery, as needed.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

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