rice & grain

puliyogare – tamarind rice

29th August 2019

Puliyogare is a traditional Karnataka style tamarind rice and is made by tempering pre-cooked rice in a spicy tamarind paste. It is very flavourful, slightly spicy, sweet and sour. Puliyogare is also prepared on auspicious days and festivals and offered as prasadam (offerings).

~ sunflower (genus helianthus)~

~ sunflowers are known to being the ‘happy’ flowers. They symbolise adoration, loyalty and longevity.

~ each sunflower is actually thousands of tenny flowers.

~ when sunflowers are young they track the sun throughout the day, this is called heliotropism. It is believed that they do this because they follow a circadian rhythm as we do as humans – they face east at dawn and slowly turn west as the sun moves across the sky before resetting themselves overnight. Mature sunflowers stop tracking the sun and only face east.

puliyogare

Don’t be tempted to go light on the sugar, this dish relies on the perfect balance of sweet and sour.

Preparation – 30 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups water

voggarane

cup peanut or coconut oil

½ tsp heaped black mustard seeds

1 tsp heaped split channa dal

½ tsp heaped split urad dal

1 heaped Tbsp peanuts, chopped

tsp asafoetida powder

12 fresh curry leaves

tsp heaped turmeric powder

2 heaped tsp/25g puliyogare gojju*

½ cup/40g dried shredded coconut

4 heaped tsp/30g jaggery/brown sugar

1 heaped tsp fine rock salt

1 flat tsp rasam powder

*If you don’t have pre-made puliyogare gojju, make your own by mixing 2 Tbsp tamarind concentrate, 1 heaped Tbsp jaggery and 1 flat tsp rasam powder – mix to a paste.

to serve

cucumber slices

yoghurt/curd rice

preparation

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and pour in 2 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 8 – 10 minutes, uncovered or until water has evaporated.

2.  Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool. Measure out the remaining ingredients.

prepare the voggarane

3.  In a skillet, over medium-high heat, add the oil, mustard seeds, channa, urad dal and peanuts; when the seeds turn grey and both dals are golden-brown, turn down the heat, add asafoetida, turmeric powder and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds, stirring to allow the spices to fry evenly.

4.  Turn off the heat and stir in the puliyogare gojju, then add coconut, jaggery, salt and rasam powder.

5.  Add the cooked rice, and gently combine, ensuring the rice is mixed well with the spices. Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt or jaggery.  Garnish with a handful of coriander leaves and serve with a spoon of ghee.

bisi-bele bāth – revisited

13th April 2018

I thought I would revisit some of my favourite recipes which I make weekly and update to our personal preferences. This is one dish I love to eat in the cooler months (which in Sintra is the most part of the year).

Once I start eating a warm bowl of Bisi-Bele Bāth a feeling of being present warms and soothes the system, satisfying all six tastes.

~ waiting for Spring

bisi-bele bāth

Preparation time – 1 hour

Serves 3 – 4 

This dish nourishes the body and suits all constitutions. It is recommended to consume in the colder months. During warmer months, it will be heavier for the body. People with vata disorder or digestion problems should not consume very often.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g toor dal

6 cups/1½ litres water

1 medium/80g carrot

1 medium/110g potato

1 cup/80g cabbage/green beans

½ cup/100g white basmati rice

10 curry leaves

1 heaped Tbsp/15g jaggery/brown sugar

1 heaped tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp tamarind paste

1 tsp ghee

¼ cup/30g frozen green peas

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

sambar-coconut paste

¼ cup/20g dried unsweetened coconut

1 heaped Tbsp/18g sambar powder (moderately spiced)

1½ cups/375ml water – divided

for the voggarane 

2 tsp ghee

¼ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

preparation 

1.  Cut the vegetables into small uniformed pieces. Measure out remaining ingredients – set aside.

2.  In a medium saucepan, wash the dal until water runs clear, drain, then add water, bring to boil, skim off any foam which accumulates on the top and simmer for 5 minutes.

3.  Add the vegetables, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer rapidly until the dal starts to soften – depending on the type of dal – approximately 15 minutes.

4.  Rinse the rice and add to dal, along with the curry leaves – rapidly simmer for 20 minutes more or until the rice is sufficiently cooked. You may need to add more water.

prepare the sambar-coconut paste 

5.  In an upright blender, place the coconut, sambar powder and pour in 1 cup water  – blend on high for 1 minute.

6.  Pour into the dal, adding ½ cup water to swish the blender clean – simmer for 5 minutes, adding more water if needed.

7.  Turn off the heat, add jaggery, tamarind, salt, ghee and green peas.  Stir, cover and allow to sit undisturbed for 5 minutes. The bisi-bele bath will thicken as it sits.

prepare the voggarane

8.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the asafoetida and turmeric, swishing the pan around to allow the spices to fry evenly – add to bisi-bele bath.

9.  Add coriander, taste, adding more salt, sambar powder, sweetener or tamarind.

To serve, spoon into bowls with a scoop of yoghurt and a drizzling of melted ghee.

Goodness shared by Stacey

pongal

7th December 2017

This is a dish I make after the Wednesday morning Yoga class when Lior is away as he usually prepares the Ayurveda meal for that day. It is much appreciated and is a wonderfully, soothing warm first meal. Pongal is favourable for all seasons, especially in the cooler months.  I serve it with tamarind gojju, steamed greens and seasonal fruits.

~A wintering garden ~

pongal

Serves 4 – 6

If wanting to make this a simple, cleansing first meal after a day of fasting omit the cashew nuts. Use only white rice as any other whole rice will change the overall flavour. 

ingredients :

1 cup/200g white basmati 

1 cup/200g moong dal, split

10 cups water

2¼ flat tsp fine rock salt

1 cup/80g dried shredded coconut

¼ cup finely chopped coriander

voggarane :

½ cup ghee – melted

1 heaped tsp whole black peppercorns

10 cashews nuts

1½ tsp heaped cumin seeds

¼ heaped tsp turmeric powder

¼ flat tsp asafoetida powder

20 fresh curry leaves

to serve :

tamarind gojju

steamed broccoli

preparation:

1.  In a saucepan, wash dal several times until water runs clear, drain, then pour 10 cups water into a saucepan and bring to boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.)  You may need to skim off any foam which accumulates at the top at the beginning of boiling. 

2.  Simmer for 20 – 30 minutes. May need to add more water, depending on the preferred consistency of your Pongal.

3.  While waiting for the rice and dal to cook, roughly grind peppercorns in a mortar and pestle and break the cashew nuts in half and half again. Measure remaining spices for the voggarane and chop the fresh coriander.  Set aside.

4.  When the rice and dal have softened sufficiently, turn off heat and stir in salt, dried coconut and fresh coriander. 

Voggarane :

5.  Heat a small pan over medium-heat, add ghee and the ground peppercorns and cashew pieces. Stir once, then allow the ghee to heat and the peppercorns to fry and cashews to turn golden – 2 minutes.

6. Turn off the heat and quickly add cumin seeds, asafoetida, turmeric and curry leaves – in this order. Allow to fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around, allowing spices to fry evenly.

7.  Pour the voggarane into the rice and dal, mixing well.  You may need to swish the pan out with a little hot water to get all the remaining spices.

8.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to be absorbed before serving. Enjoy as is with a spoon of ghee or my prefered way of serving Pongal is with a tamarind gojju and lightly steamed greens. 

Goodness shared by Stacey

lemon rice

15th October 2016

4V7A4788_1980x1297

A delicious recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme. Lemon rice is a simple and tasty dish, it is easily digested and suitable for all constitutions. It can be used daily and throughout all seasons.  Serve with a simple vegetable palya, green salad or with a cucumber raita.

jasmin-balal-circlejasmin-garlandmaking-jasmine

Beautiful India

Mallige – Jasmine flower, Mysore 

4V7A4809_1_1980x1297

Lemon Rice (Chitraanna)

Serves 3 – 4

Channa and urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store, when briefly fried in the oil they add a lovely crunch to the dish.  The fresh curry leaves when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months – they have wonderful medicinal qualities. 

Use heaped when measurements except stated otherwise.

ingredients 

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups/500ml water

1 large carrot – 150g

2 tsp ginger, grated 

½ cup/40g dried unsweetened shredded coconut

1 tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp sugar/jaggery

1 -2 Tbsp lemon juice

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane

¼ cup peanut/melted coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

2 tsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dal 

1 medium, mild dried red chilli

10 raw cashew nuts

1 tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

prepare the rice

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and pour in water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer.  Do not cover the pot with a lid, as this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until the water has evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

2.  While waiting for the rice to cool, grate the carrot – measuring 1 cup, grate the ginger, chop the coriander, cut the chilli into 3-4 pieces, halve the cashews. Set aside.

prepare the voggarne

3.  In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splatter and pop, add the channa and urad dal – fry for a few seconds, then add the chilli, cashews, and cumin seeds – fry until channa dal is golden in colour. Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder – continue to fry for a few seconds.  

4.  Stir in the grated carrot, ginger, coconut, salt, jaggery and lemon juice – cook for 6 minutes, until all ingredients have combined and the carrot is soft. Turn off the heat.

4V7A4749_1980x1297

5.  Add the cooled rice and coriander and using the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices. Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery or lemon.  Serve immediately.  

Lemon rice can be served with raita, plain yoghurt or accompanied with a vegetable palya.

variation

  • replace the carrot with finely chopped red pepper and cabbage.

4V7A4794_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

coriander leaf vānghī bāth

25th August 2016

4V7A5780_1_1980x1297

We made this dish in the last ‘Introduction to Meditation & Ayurvedic Cooking’ workshop we held in June.  It is a recipe given to us by Gillian, taught to her by our teacher’s wife – the original recipe uses fresh fenugreek leaves which are hard to come by here in Portugal, so the coriander leaves make a lovely alternative.

The Ayurvedic cooking session is taught in the last part of the workshop, so we all get to share in a blessing together and enjoy the meal we have just prepared.  This Coriander Leaf Vanghi Bath with Indian spices and heaps of coriander leaves is superb, and goes perfectly accompanied by a salad of grated carrot; a big bowl of sliced cucumber and various leaves and flowers picked fresh from the garden. Each workshop is very special and as we partake and teach more and more of them, we become open, confident and efficient in the running of them.  Both days were deliciously warm, sunny and still, so we were able to open up the doors and sit outside during the breaks to enjoy the beautiful presence of nature and the warmth of the sun.

Our next workshop is planned for November and is open to register here.

4V7A5741_1980x12974V7A5732_30workshop - 1 4V7A5778_30

coriander leaf vānghī bāth

Use heaped spoon measurements, except when stated otherwise.

Preparation – 30 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients

1 cup/200g white basmati rice

2 cups/500ml water

3 bunches/155g coriander leaves, chopped

½ cup/40g dried shredded coconut

1 tsp fine rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

1 tsp tamarind paste

2 tsp sambar powder

Voggarane

¼ cup coconut oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

to serve

raw beetroot, fennel salad with ginger lemon dressing

yoghurt

 

4V7A5854_1980x1297

preparation

1.  In a saucepan, wash the rice until the water runs clear, drain and add water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 8-10 minutes, uncovered or until water has evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

2.  While waiting for the rice to cool, wash the coriander leaves, dry and chop (including stems) – measuring 3 tightly packed cups.  Measure out the remaining ingredients – set aside.

prepare the voggarane

3.  In a skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil, add mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the asafoetida, turmeric and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow the spices to fry evenly.

4. Add the coriander leaves, cook for 1 – 2 minutes, then add coconut, salt, jaggery, tamarind paste and sambar powder, and stir for 1 minute, then turn off the heat. 

coriander leaf vanghibath - 1 (1)

5. Add the cooled rice and combine the rice using a wooden spoon or the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices.

coriander leaf vanghibath - 1

6.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery.  Garnish with a handful of extra fresh coriander leaves and serve with a spoon of ghee.

4V7A5784_30

Goodness shared by Stacey

Jonathan’s weekend upma

22nd April 2015

4V7A2499_1980x1297

My husband has a few signature dishes, the most favoured is his pasta sauce, Indian lemon rice and this one, which he makes for us every Saturday morning.

4V7A3097_1980x12974V7A1384_1980x12974V7A1434_1980x12974V7A1437_1980x12974V7A2496_1980x1297

Jonathan’s weekend upma with charred okra

Serves 2-3

This is a savoury semolina pilaf.  Cut the vegetables into small uniformed pieces, so they cook evenly and vary your choice of vegetables to what is in season.

ingredients 

1 cup/170g medium-ground semolina

2½ cups hot water

voggarane

cup/80ml peanut or coconut oil

½ tsp mustard seed

1 Tbsp split channa dāl 

1 tsp split urad dāl

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

10 cashew/peanuts, cut in half

1 dried red chilli, chopped

1 tsp cumin seed

10 curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

1 medium carrot, finely chopped

1 green or red bell pepper, finely chopped 

1 tsp ginger, finely chopped 

1 tsp salt

1 tsp jaggery

1 tsp lemon juice

¼ cup/20g dried coconut

¼ cup coriander, chopped

toast the semolina 

1.  Dry-fry the semolina in a skillet over moderate heat, stirring continuously until it turns golden- brown or emits a good smell – pour into a bowl and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

2.  Heat oil in a medium-large skillet, add mustard seed, channa and urad dāl, asafoetida, cashew and chilli; when mustard seeds pop and both dāl are golden-brown, add cumin, curry leaves and turmeric – fry for 10 secs.

3.  Stir in the carrot, green pepper, ginger, salt, sugar, lemon juice and coconut -bring to boil, simmer for 1 minute, then reduce heat.

4.  Pour in the semolina, stirring continuously – until the water has evaporated, 1 – 2 minutes. Turn off the heat, add the coriander, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes.  When ready, fluff up with a fork and add more salt if desired. When serving, drizzle with ghee to aid digestion.

charred okra

ingredients

300g small okra

2 Tbsp coconut/peanut oil

pinch asafoetida powder

a sprinkling of salt

preparation

1.  Using a small knife, trim the okra, removing the stem, slicing in half lengthwise and half again.

2.  Place a heavy-based frying pan on high and leave to heat for a few minutes; once hot, drizzle in a tiny bit of oil/ghee and asafoetida, add the okra, stirring every minute.  The okra should start to have dark blisters and a charred look – cook for 5 minutes until charred and soft.

3.  Sprinkle with salt and serve immediately over the upma.

4V7A4871_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Prepared by Jonathan

lemon rice with sprouted mung beans & grated carrot

28th April 2010

Another week into Anna’s and my food exchange.  She made for us this week: steamed green beans, Japanese rice, steamed homemade tofu and oven-baked Julienne sweet potatoes and potatoes, all with this sweet tamari sauce.

My meal for them was a simple yellow dal and this Indian lemon rice.  My husband’s favourite. I love it served with an avocado and yoghurt sauce.  They seem to be made for each other.  I have also made this with quinoa, instead of brown rice, which makes it a light summer dish.

One of my favourite things in the kitchen at the moment is the zesting of a lemon.  Its citrus sharpness adds a dimension to so many foods. I have started adding it to everything from desserts to salads, tahini, and all garnishing. The lemon zest works beautifully in this lemon rice.  It is a simple, quick way to add freshness to your cooking.  Use the finest holes on your grater and only use the yellow part of the skin.  The white pith tends to taste very bitter.  Grate your zest as close as possible to the time that you are going to use it, as it will dry out fairly quickly.

lemon rice

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients 

1 cup brown basmati rice (preferably rinsed & soaked overnight)

2½ cups water

cup peanut/coconut oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 Tbsp freshly grated ginger

15 fresh curry leaves

1 whole green chilli

½ tsp turmeric powder

tsp asafoetida powder

¼ cup roughly chopped cashews

1 cup mung bean sprouts (see easy sprouting recipe)

2 medium carrots, grated

1 medium bell pepper, finely chopped

¼ cup dried coconut

freshly chopped coriander

juice of 1 lemon

zest of a lemon

1 tsp fine rock salt

preparation 

1.  Bring the rice and water to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer for 8 -10 mins, turn down the heat, cover and simmer until the water has evaporated. Optional to add three cardamom pods for extra flavour.

2.  In a skillet, heat ghee, add mustard seeds; when seeds splatter and pop, reduce heat, add cumin seeds, ginger, curry leaves, chilli, turmeric, asafoetida and cashews – fry until the cashews are golden brown.

3.  Add the bell pepper, allow to soften, then add the sprouted mung beans and grated carrot, stirring – cook for 1 minute to retain the crunchiness of the sprouts.

4.  Turn off heat, stir in the cooked rice, coconut, fresh coriander and lemon juice (until preferred taste), lemon zest, salt and pepper.

Serve with a drizzling of melted ghee and a generous dollop of yoghurt & avocado sauce.

Goodness shared from Stacey

All rights reserved © Goodness is…. · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie