kichadi

easy one-pot kichadi

30th December 2018

This is a quick satisfying one-pot meal to prepare. It is easy to digest, nourishing, balancing and a complete protein in one bowl. When eaten together, rice and dal provide all the essential amino acids for a nutritionally sustainable meal. Perfect for when you don’t have a lot of time to cook and need something fast but with enough nutrients to sustain you. It can be eaten in the morning or evening and takes only half an hour to prepare.

When preparing Kichadi, it is important to understand the different types of dal or legumes used and their energetic qualities.  There is one type of dal which is favourable and used most often – whole moong(mung beans) and when husked and split becomes split moong. These two are easy to digest, gentle on the system and cause minimum disturbances to all constitutions.  All other dals or legumes are recommended to use in moderation and small quantities.

When serving Kichadi, drizzle with a spoon of ghee. GHEE is a magical golden substance that has many benefits for the human system including improved digestion as well as making everything taste better.

I recently spent a week with my daughter helping her organise her first apartment in London. She needed a few quick no-fuss meals that she could make while balancing studies and working – this was one of them.

Easy One-Pot Kichadi

Preparation – 35 minutes

Serves 2

ingredients
⅓ cup/60g split moong dal
⅓ cup/60g white basmati rice
3 cups/750ml water

1 Tbsp ghee
¼ tsp mustard seeds
½ tsp cumin seeds
Pinch of asafoetida
½ small red chilli (optional)
6 curry leaves
⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup/30g chopped cabbage
½ cup/70g finely chopped carrot

¾ tsp fine rock salt
½ tsp jaggery/brown sugar
1 Tbsp dried shredded coconut
1 tsp finely chopped ginger
1 – 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped
to serve
ghee
Indian spicy pickle

preparation
1.  Place the dal and rice in a bowl, rinse with water until the water runs clear, drain and pour in 3 cups water. Set aside.

2.  In a saucepan over medium-high heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the mustard seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida, and chilli – fry for a few seconds, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly.

3.  Add in the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for a few seconds.

4.  Pour the dal, rice and water into the voggarane, bring to boil over high heat, then lower to maintain a rapid simmer.

5.  While waiting for the dal and rice to boil, finely chop the carrot and cabbage and add this to the simmering rice and dal.

6.  After 20 minutes, turn the heat to low and cover. When the dal and rice have softened, add the salt, jaggery, ginger, dried coconut, lemon juice and coriander – turn off the heat, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to meld together.

Taste adding more lemon or salt as needed. Serve drizzled with ghee.

suggestions

  • Soak the dal and rice in the morning for quick evening preparation.

variations

  • Replace the white basmati rice with quinoa. Using ½ cup quinoa and ¼ cup dal.
  • Change the vegetables to suit the seasons.
  • Add ½  – 1 tsp sambar powder, replace the lemon juice with tamarind paste.

barley kichadi

22nd February 2017

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Barley is cooling, sweet, and mildly astringent.  Ideal for decreasing pitta and kapha.  It can improve a sluggish digestion and has a slightly drying effect, helping to clear fluids from the body. Barley is considered one of the “good” carbohydrates.

If the water in which barley is boiled, is given to a person suffering from diarrhoea it gives him instant relief.

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~ evening reflections.

~ Pleopeltis polypodioides, also known as the resurrection fern. The resurrection fern gets its name because it can survive long periods of drought by curling up its fronds, appearing grey-brown and dead. However, when just a little water is present, the fern will uncurl and reopen, appearing to “resurrect” and restoring itself to a vivid green colour within about 24 hours.

~’Chasmanthe floribunda, African cornflag.

~ the outer edges of the wall at the end of the day.

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barley kichadi

preparation 50 minutes

serves 3 – 4

I have been making this weekly, quick and easy with a scoop of thick yoghurt and a drizzling of ghee. It is a wonderful warming, soothing and cleansing meal.  When simmering the dal, simmer until they still hold their shape and before they turn to mush.  I use organic pearl barley in this recipe, if using unhusked barley it will need an overnight soaking and longer cooking time – recommended to boil separately ½ hour before adding the dal.

Our favourite barley recipe is this lovely soothing lemon barley water.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g  pearl barley

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)

8 cups /2-litre water

1 cup/90g celery/fennel, chopped

1 cup/50gcabbage, chopped 

1 heaped teaspoon rock salt 

1 heaped Tbsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

¼ cup/60g frozen green peas

voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli, chopped

10-15 fresh curry leaves, torn in half

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

½ cup fresh coriander, roughly chopped 

2 cups kale/spinach/fenugreek leaves, roughly chopped

to serve 

yoghurt

ghee

preparation 

1.  In a saucepan, wash the barley, until the water runs clear, then pour in 8 cups water, bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer for 10 minutes. Add the dal and simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

2.  Add the celery and cabbage – simmer until barley has softened and the dal is cooked but still holding their shape – approximately 20 – 30 minutes. Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.

3.  Add the peas, salt, jaggery, dried coconut and chopped ginger – simmer for a few minutes, then turn off the heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, and chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly, then pour the voggarane into the kichadi.

6.  Squeeze in the lemon juice, and stir in the coriander and kale. Cover allow to sit 5 minutes, then check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

When ready, drizzle with ghee, garnish with coriander and serve with a spoon of yoghurt.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

turmeric flavoured millet, amaranth & seasonal vegetables

1st June 2014

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I thought I would share this simple, but extremely quick and easy nutritious meal I have most mornings. You will appreciate the ease which the body digest it.  It is actually my first meal of the day at around 10 or 11 o’clock, depending on when I feel the first signs of hunger.

I love these one-pot meals that use a number of different foods cooked in a single pot with ample water.

The importance of this bowl is finding the right millet to use. I use a very small grain (foxtail millet) as opposed to the bigger commonly found millet, which can become quite dry when cooked.  The foxtail millet is much finer and softly moist, and when combined with amaranth, the two together create a very soothing, playful texture.

Amaranth is high in protein, fibre, rich in vitamins, and exceptionally rich in the amino acid, lysine, which is absent in most other cereal grains. It is also high in calcium and has an iron content four times higher than brown rice.

I change the vegetables to what is in season and depending on what can be picked from the garden. Sometimes I use celery when there is no fennel or broccoli, spinach opposed to kale, sweet peas instead of beans etc.  To serve, I  keep it as simple as possible, just adding a little Indian pickle (something spicy), half of an avocado or scoop of yoghurt and lavishly drizzle with ghee.

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turmeric flavoured millet,amaranth & vegetables

Serves 2

The dish can be made with quinoa, rice or any grain of your choice – the cooking times may vary though.

ingredients 

¼ cup/50g millet

¼ cup/50g amaranth

2 cups water

1 tsp ghee

1 tsp turmeric powder

1 cup fresh seasonal vegetables – carrot, cherry tomatoes, green beans, cabbage, a handful of small broccoli florets, finely chopped

½ medium fennel bulb, finely chopped

for the voggarane 

1 Tbsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves, roughly torn

pinch asafoetida (optional)

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

few rounds of freshly ground pepper

a handful of green leaves (kale, small broccoli leaves, chard, etc)

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

preparation 

1.  In a heavy-bottomed pot, wash the millet and amaranth, drain, pour in 2 cups water and 1 heaped spoon ghee and turmeric, bring to boil, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, simmer uncovered for 2 mins.

2.  Add the vegetables which require more cooking time and set aside the broccoli and fresh greens leaves, which will be added just before it has finished cooking – allow to simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes.

3.  Turn off the heat, add the broccoli florets greens, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  Heat ghee in a small saucepan, add cumin seeds, asafoetida (if using) and curry leaves – allow to sizzle for a few seconds, swishing the pan for the spices to fry evenly. Add to the millet and vegetables.

5.  Stir in the salt, pepper and jaggery, recover and allow to sit undisturbed for a 10 minutes before serving.

6.  When serving, drizzle with ghee.  If not serving with pickle, add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Updated:  Enjoyed this, this morning sitting in the sun.  I added okra and red pepper which I sautéed together in a very hot skillet, charring the edges a bit.  It was a delicious combination.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

soothing quinoa and dal kichadi

13th January 2014

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This is a magical meal I make a lot especially when travelling.  It takes no time at all and is much lighter than the brown rice version.

We have just spent some time in Israel, and this was the first time I had been back since leaving.  I love the vegetables in Israel which have a unique freshness and tastiness which I have not encountered anywhere else.  The cucumbers and oranges are AMAZING!

For the first week I used this opportunity to do a simple cleanse, and each morning, I walked through the Jaffa port to a quaint health food store ‘Niroli’ in Neve Tzedek and had a freshly made green juice.  The rest of the day was salads and this soothing warming kichadi for dinner.  Served with a simple grated beetroot salad and home-made pickle, it is a complete easy meal which soothes the mind, body and spirit.

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This was the only photo I took while in Israel in Jaffa, but I am so glad I did.  As now I am back to a European Winter, it is nice to be reminded of the light in Israel and how uniquely beautiful and amazing it is. P1070333 P1070332

soothing quinoa & dal kichadi

Serves 3 – 4

Inspired by Kristin,

ingredients 

¾ cup quinoa (preferably soaked for 20 minutes)

½ cup split moong dal

3 cups water

¼ tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp ghee

1 medium carrot

1 stick celery

½ cup chopped cabbage

½ cup broccoli florets

½ tsp tamarind paste/lemon juice

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

1 tsp fine rock salt

few rounds of ground pepper

¼ cup dried shredded coconut

½ cup fresh coriander, kale or young broccoli leaves, finely chopped

for the voggarane

1 tsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

tsp asafoetida powder

1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

¼½ tsp chilli flakes/1 fresh green chilli, cut with a slit into it

6 curry leaves, fresh

½ tsp rasam powder

to serve

ghee

lemon wedges

spicy pickle

preparation 

1.  In a saucepan, rinse the quinoa and dal, until the water runs clear – set aside to soak for 15 minutes, drain, then pour in 3 cups water, a spoon of ghee and turmeric powder, bring to a boil, turn down to a slow simmer – simmer for 30 minutes, uncovered.  You may have to add a little water if it looks like it is drying out.

2.  Cut the carrots, celery and cabbage into small uniformed pieces and add to rice and dal -simmer for 15 mins.  Depending on the desired consistency, add water.

prepare the voggarane

3.  In a small saucepan, heat a little ghee, when hot, add the cumin seeds, asafoetida, ginger, chilli, rasam powder and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds, swish or stir pan for spices to fry evenly.

4.  Add the voggarane to the kichadi, along with the finely chopped broccoli – allow to simmer for a few minutes until the broccoli is just tender.

5.  Add tamarind, jaggery, coconut, salt and pepper to taste – combine well. Stir through the coriander, kale or broccoli leaves.

When serving, drizzle each bowl lavishly with ghee.  Serve with freshly grated beetroot and home-made pickle.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

summer moon kichadi

27th June 2012

I spent the late, late part of the day working in the garden under a big, white, round moon…..


summer moon kichadi

Guaranteed to soothe unsettled hearts.

Generously serves 3 

ingredients 

½ cup brown basmati rice

½ cup split moong dal/red lentils, although the moong dal is ideal as it has a very soft, soothing quality

3 cups water

¼ tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp ghee

voggarane

2 tsp ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

1 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

¼ – ½ tsp chilli flakes/or a fresh green chilli, chopped (depending on your level of spice)

½ tsp rasam powder

6 curry leaves

2 small carrots

6 small zucchinis (just a little bit bigger than your index finger)

½ cup fresh/frozen green peas

1 tsp salt

½ tesp jaggery

¼ cup coriander leaves

squeeze fresh lemon

to serve

lots and lots of ghee

preparation 

1.   In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, rinse the rice until the water runs clear, add water, ghee and turmeric powder, bring to a boil, then turn down to a slow simmer for 20 minutes.

2.  Rinse the dal until the water runs clear and add to the rice, continue to simmer.  You may have to add a little water if it looks like it is drying out.

3.  Cut the carrots and zucchinis into moons and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a medium pan, add ghee and cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, ginger, chilli, rasam powder and curry leaves – fry for 30 seconds.  

5.  Add carrots and zucchinis, cover and saute until just tender.  You may need to sprinkle a little water once or twice.  

6.  Add the green peas and saute for a few minutes, then turn off the heat, and set aside.

7.  When the rice and dal are soft, add the vegetable mixture, salt to taste, jaggery and combine well – simmer for a few minutes.  Depending on the desired consistency, you can add water.

8.  Add the coriander and a squeeze of lemon.

When serving, drizzle each bowl lavishly with ghee.

Goodness shared from Stacey

ahhhh……kichadi

28th December 2009

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I always turn to this healing Ayurvedic dish when I need a simple cleanse.  I prepare kichadi with a variation on the vegetables for a few days – to one week – alongside plenty of water, fresh fruits, steamed vegetables and cumin & coriander kashaya.  It always feels cleansing and nourishing.

There are endless variations to this dish, all dependent on the herbs, spices and vegetables used. Whenever my tummy is feeling sensitive, kichadi is always a medicine to my body and has the same soothing quality and nostalgia as a bowl of warm porridge.  All healing begins with the digestive tract.  Kichadi is good for all body types and depending on your constitution a few adjustments to the recipe can help balance out your constitution.

If you tend to have a pitta imbalance(fire & earth), moderate use of heating spices like pepper, ginger, mustard seeds and chilli.  Imbalances are usually seen in skin rashes, burning sensations, ulcerations, fever, rapid changing in moods and anger.  Kapha imbalance,(earth & water) avoid extra ghee or oil and yoghurt which can make a slow digestion and excess mucus. Imbalances are likely to be seen as colds, congestion, depression, excess weight and headaches. Vata (wind and space) imbalance, avoid eating too many cold raw foods and increase the heating spices. Imbalances may be seen in aching joints, dry skin and hair, nerve disturbances, constipation and mental confusion. A skilled Ayurveda physician can access your pulse and give you the right information about your constitution.

Just a quick note on asafoetida. It has a very strong smell due to their sulphur compounds. Asafoetida is available in solid wax-like pieces or in powder form.  Used sparingly, it gives a flavour similar to garlic and shallots in vegetables, stews and sauces.  The smell quickly disappears with cooking. It is a frequent ingredient in Indian dishes, especially as a replacement for garlic and onion which is not used by yoga practitioners in their cooking.  I am not sure if you have noticed, but all my recipes use no onion or garlic. Garlic and onion are avoided because they can agitate or excite the body and stimulate the nervous system, making it difficult for meditation. 

Another practical use is as a natural pesticide to ward off unwanted animals in the garden.  Mix 2 tablespoons of powdered asafoetida with 1½ litres of water, shake hard, then apply around plants.

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 healing kichadi

For a lighter spring/summer kichadi, see recipe here or here. One of my favourites is this barley kichadi.

ingredients 

½ cup whole moong dal (mung beans)

½ cup brown basmati  rice

4 cups/1 litres water

3 cardamom pods

1 cup broccoli\cabbage, finely chopped

1 tsp rock salt 

1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup dried shredded coconut

1 heaped tsp finely chopped ginger

voggarane 

1 Tbsp  ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 medium red chilli

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

¼ cup coriander, chopped

1 cup roughly chopped kale

extra ghee for serving

preparation 

1.  In a heavy saucepan, rinse the rice and dal until the water runs clear, drain, then pour in the 1-litre water, add the cardamom pods and bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 15 minutes uncovered, then add the cabbage.

2.   Simmer until dal and rice has broken down and softened – approximately 30 – 40 minutes. You may have to add water as needed. While waiting for the dal and rice to cook, chop the chilli into three pieces and tear the curry leaves in half (this way everyone is guaranteed to consume a curry leaf and benefit from their medicinal properties) and measure the spices for the voggarane.

3.  Add salt, jaggery, dried coconut and chopped ginger – simmer for 1-2 minutes more, then turn off the heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop, turn down the heat and add cumin seeds and chopped chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly.

6.  Pour the voggarane into the cooked dal and rice and stir in the lemon juice.

7.  With your hands, break up the fresh coriander, roughly chopped kale and stir into the kichadi.  Check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

At serving time, garnish with fresh coriander and drizzle with ghee.  Top with a dollop of spicy yoghurt and avocado mixture or plain yoghurt and pickle.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

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