dal, rasam & sambar

whole moong dal with garden greens – two variations

18th March 2019

There are two different ways to prepare this dish. One is more of a soupy, liquid dish and the second is a dry palya of sorts; both use the same ingredients, whilst the main difference being the amount of water used.

Soupy Whole Moong Dal with Garden Greens

Preparation 40 minutes

Serves 3

ingredients
½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)
4½ cups water
2 cups/55g loosely packed kale/fenugreek/spinach,cabbage & coriander leaves
2 Tbsp dried shredded coconut
1 tsp fine rock salt
1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar
1 -2 tsp lemon juice
voggarane
1 – 2 Tbsp ghee
½ tsp black mustard seeds
1  heaped Tbsp split channa dal
1 heaped tsp cumin seeds
1 chilli (broken into three pieces)
⅛ tsp asafoetida powder
⅛ tsp turmeric powder
12 curry leaves

to serve
Rice
Yoghurt with cucumber
Beetroot Palya /Shaved Beetroot Salad

preparation
1.  In a medium saucepan wash the dal until the water runs clear, drain, then pour in the water, bring to boil, reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer, uncovered until tender – about 20-30 minutes or until the dal is cooked. Just keep in mind you may need to add more water when cooking – depending on the quality of your dal.

2. While waiting for the dal to cook, wash the greens and roughly chop. Measure out the remaining ingredients. Set aside.

prepare the voggarane
3.  In a small pan over medium-high heat, heat the ghee, add mustard seeds and channa dal, fry until the mustard seeds turn grey and the dal is golden brown.

4.  Turn down the heat and add the chilli and asafoetida powder – continue to fry for 20 seconds, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly, add the curry leaves and turmeric powder, turn off the heat, then add the voggarane into the dal.

5.  Sprinkle in the dried coconut, salt, jaggery, lemon juice and fold in the green leaves – mix well, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes until the greens have wilted. Taste adding more sweet or sour as needed.

Serve over rice, drizzle with ghee and sprinkle with a few rounds of freshly ground pepper.

suggestions

  • Soak the dal in the morning or evening for quick meal preparation.
  • To keep the green leaves vibrant, add only when ready to serve.

variations

  • Use split yellow moong dal instead of the whole moong dal.
  • Add in finely chopped carrot instead of the garden greens.

Dry moong dal with garden greens

Preparation – 40 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients
½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)
3 cups/750ml water
2 cups/55g loosely packed kale/fenugreek/spinach/cabbage & coriander leaves
2 Tbsp dried shredded coconut
1 tsp fine rock salt
1 tsp jaggery/brown sugar
1 – 2 Tbsp lemon juice
voggarane
1 Tbsp ghee
½ tsp black mustard seeds
1 heaped Tbsp split channa dal
1 heaped tsp cumin seeds
1 chilli (broken into three pieces)
⅛ tsp asafoetida powder
⅛ tsp turmeric powder
12 curry leaves

to serve

tomato gojju

shaved carrot salad

guacamole

rice

preparation

1.  In a medium saucepan wash the dal until the water runs clear, drain, then pour in the water, bring to boil, reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer, uncovered until tender – about 20-30 minutes. Just keep in mind you may need to add more water when cooking – depending on the quality of your dal. Keep an eye on them and judge so that you are not left with mush. You want the moong dal firm but cooked.

2. While waiting for the dal to soften, wash the greens and finely chop. Measure out the remaining ingredients – set aside.

3.  When the dal is ready, pour into a strainer to drain off any excess water – leave for a few minutes.

prepare the voggarane
4.  In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, add the ghee, once it’s hot, add the mustard seeds and channa dal; fry until the mustard seeds start to pop and the dal is golden-brown.

5.  Turn down the heat and add the chilli and asafoetida powder – continue to fry for 20 seconds, then add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – allow to fry for a few seconds, stirring for the spices to fry evenly.

6.  Turn off the heat and add the greens, mix well (may need to add 2 tablespoons of water if it feels to dry). Cover and allow the greens to wilt.

7.  Stir in the cooked dal, dried coconut, salt and jaggery – mix well, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to come together. Taste adding more sweet or sour – I like to add extra lemon juice.  When serving, garnish with lemon zest and freshly grated coconut.

favourite rasam recipe – three ways

22nd August 2018

This is a recipe I fall back on as a twice or thrice weekly meal. It is the same recipe, same measurement of spices, using a variety of different dal and vegetables. The first two recipes include grinding the coconut-rasam mixture, while the third does not, making it a quicker dish to prepare. It’s a good example of how one recipe can be used in many variations to give a totally different dish.

In these three recipes, I alternate between using mung beans(whole moong dal)toor dal and split yellow moong dal. The rasam powder can be replaced with sambar powder in all dishes.

whole mung beans with tomatoes & chard

Preparation 40 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

ingredients 

½ cup/100g mung beans(whole moong dal)

4 cups water/1-litre

1 medium tomato(100g), finely chopped

1 cup/50g tightly packed chard leaves (can use kale/fenugreek)

2 heaped Tbsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 heaped tsp rock salt

sambar-coconut mix

¼ cup/20g dried shredded unsweetened coconut

1½ heaped tsp rasam powder (mildly spiced) 

½ – 1 tsp tamarind paste 

1½ cups/375ml water

voggarane 

2 tsp ghee

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder 

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

preparation

1.  In a heavy-based saucepan, wash the dal until the water runs clear, drain, pour in 4 cups water into the saucepan and bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer.

2.  After 10 minutes, add the tomatoes – simmer until dal is soft and has broken down – approximately 30 minutes. 

prepare the rasam-coconut mix

3.  In an upright blender, add the dried coconut, rasam powder, tamarind, and ¾ cup water, blend for 1 minute, until smooth, then add to dal rinsing the blender clean with the remaining ¾ cup water.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, heat the ghee, add mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly.

5.  Pour the voggarane into the dal, add salt, jaggery and stir in the chopped chard leaves.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to settle, the chard to soften and dal to thicken slightly.  Taste adding more sweet, tamarind or salt.

Serve with rice, yoghurt and drizzle with a spoon of ghee.

split moong dal with charred okra & fenugreek

Preparation – 40 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

This dish requires frying the vegetables, in this case, the okra, in the voggarane until nicely charred, then stirring it through the cooked dal when ready to serve. I like to keep 1 cup of the okra aside to use as garnish. This method of cooking works very nicely with green beans as well.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g split yellow moong dal

3 cups/750ml water

2 heaped Tbsp sugar/jaggery

1 heaped tsp rock salt

rasam-coconut mix

¼ cup/20g dried shredded unsweetened coconut

1½ heaped tsp rasam powder (moderately spiced)

½ – 1 tsp tamarind paste 

1½ cups/375ml water

voggarane 

3 Tbsp peanut oil

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped Tbsp channa dal

1 heaped tsp urad dal

400g okra

15 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder 

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

2 cups fresh fenugreek/kale/ coriander leaves – chopped

preparation

1.  In a heavy-based saucepan, wash the dal until the water runs clear, drain, pour in 3 cups water and bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer until dal is soft and has broken down – approximately 30 minutes.

2. Top, tail the okra and cut into 1 cm pieces and measure out the remaining ingredients – set aside.

prepare the rasam-coconut mix

3.  In an upright blender, add the rasam powder, tamarind, dried coconut and ¾ cup water, blend for 1 minute, until smooth, add to the dal rinsing the blender clean with the remaining ¾ cup water.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a skillet over medium-high heat, add oil and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the channa and urad dal, fry until both dals are golden-brown.

5.  Add the okra and keep everything moving in the pan until all the okra starts to char around the edges – approximately 5 minutes, then turn off the heat and fold in the chopped fenugreek leaves.

6.  Set aside 1 cup of the cooked okra for garnishing and stir the remaining into the dal.  Taste adding more sweet, sour or salt.

This dish is best served immediately as the okra can become gooey, otherwise, keep the okra and dal separate until ready to serve. Serve with rice and drizzle with ghee.

toor dal with carrots and green beans

Preparation 40 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

This is the same procedure, using a different dal and vegetables, however, the rasam and coconut are added directly into the dish, no grinding required.

ingredients 

½ cup/100g toor dal 

cups /1-litre water

1 medium/100g carrot – finely chopped

1½ cups finely chopped beans (can use cabbage in Winter)

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 ½ heaped tsp rasam powder (mildly spiced) 

½ – 1 tsp tamarind paste 

2 heaped Tbsp sugar/jaggery

1 heaped tsp rock salt

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped

voggarane 

2 tsp ghee

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder 

heaped tsp turmeric powder

preparation 

1.  In a heavy-based saucepan, wash dal until the water runs clear, drain, then pour in 4 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer. 

2.  After 10 minutes, add the carrot and green beans, simmer until dal is soft and has broken down – approximately 30 minutes.

3.  Stir in the coconut, rasam powder, tamarind, salt and jaggery, mix to combine well – simmer for 4 -5 minutes.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add the asafoetida, curry leaves and turmeric, swishing the pan for the spices to fry evenly.

5.  Pour the voggarane into the dal, and stir in the coriander.  Allow to sit for 10 minutes for the flavours to settle and dal to thicken slightly.  Serve with rice and drizzle with ghee.

chuchu gojju

31st July 2017

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Chuchu, (commonly known as Seemebadanekaayi in South India, or chayote squash in Mexico) is a pear-shaped, light-green vegetable in the gourd family. It has a crunchy texture and a mild, sweet taste. Chuchu is a perennial vine that climbs over fences, shrubs, and even on trees. There is no need to peel the skin in the young, tender pears. However, larger and over-mature fruits need light peeling using a vegetable peeler. When in season, you can find it in most supermarkets here in Portugal.  I make this weekly for a simple no-fuss dinner – served with brown basmati rice and an extra drizzling of ghee.  I also use them when making a simple dal – grated carrot and finely chopped chuchu is a magical combination.

To sprout:  Each chuchu contains a single seed which is enclosed within the fruit and cannot be separated from the fruit.  To sprout, place the whole fruit on a light-filled window sill and within days the chuchu will sprout from the broad end.  You can also set the whole fruit directly in the soil and within a week or two will sprout.

chuchu sprout - 1

Plant 1 chuchu vine per household of 4 persons. Chuchu is a vigorous climber; set a sturdy trellis or support in place at planting. Do not allow maturing fruit to come in contact with the soil; it will spoil and germinate while still attached to the vine. Chuchu will be ready for harvest when the fruit is tender and about 4 to 6 – inches in diameter, usually 120 to 150 days after planting. Cut chuchu from the vine with a knife or hand-pruner and harvest before the flesh gets hard.

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chuchu gojju

Serves 3 – 4.

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme. 

Chuchu gojju is best served with rice or dosa – the dosa flavour and rice texture mixes well with the flavour of this dish.  It can also be served with chapati, however, it is best to decrease the amount of tamarind (sour) added.  Eggplant or capsicum can replace the chuchu, additional capsicum may also be added.

ingredients 

1 medium/280g chuchu, chopped into small uniformed pieces

1 cup/250mL water

1½ tsp fine rock salt

3 heaped tsp brown sugar/jaggery

¼ cup coriander leaves, roughly chopped

voggarane 

¼ cup/60ml peanut or coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

15 fresh curry leaves

sambar – coconut paste

¾ cup/60g dried shredded coconut

2 heaped tsp Sambar powder- moderately spiced

1 tsp tamarind paste

2 cups/500mL water – divided

to serve 

brown rice

ghee

voggarane

1. In a pan over medium-high heat, heat the oil, add mustard seeds; when seeds turn grey and pop, add asafoetida, turmeric powder and curry leaves  – continue to fry for a few seconds.

2.  Add the chuchu and 1 cup water, simmer, uncovered until the chuchu softens – about 15 minutes. Add salt and jaggery, mix well.

sambar – coconut paste

3.  In a blender, place the dried coconut, sambar powder, tamarind paste and 1½ cups water – blend until smooth, approximately 1 minute.   

4.  Add sambar-coconut paste into gojju, using remaining ½ cup water to swish the blender clean.

5.  Allow to simmer rapidly for 5 minutes, stirring once or twice, then turn off heat and add the coriander.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes, then taste, and adjust the sweet, sour or salt to your preference.  The gojju will thicken as it cools. 

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Goodness shared by Stacey

one-pot dal for Yasmin

6th March 2017

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A simple dal we make weekly, served with chapati and alongside a cabbage or okra palya.  A recipe my daughter requested that I write-up so that she can refer to when she moves out later this year.  It is also one of her favourite meal combinations.  We are in the process of learning how to make 6 easy meals which she can prepare herself.  This dal is one of them.

If the thought of making chapati sounds a bit overwhelming – it can be served with a bowl of rice and a crispy salad.  When drizzled with ghee it becomes a deeply soothing, warming, nourishing meal.

The tomatoes can be replaced with any vegetable of choice,  I like the process of stewing them in a voggarane pan before adding in the dal, this way they slightly caramelise, deepening the flavour with the spices.

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~ Evening forage at the end of the day in a blanket of mist.  Silent.

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one-pot dal

Preparation – 30 mins

Serves 3 – 4

Inspired by Tara O’brady – Everyday Yellow Dal.

In Ayurveda, it is important to understand the different types of dal/legumes used and their energetic qualities. The most favourable and used most often – whole moong (mung beans); when husked and split becomes split moong. These two are easy to digest, gentle on the system and cause minimum disturbances to all constitutions.  All other dals are recommended to use in moderation and in small quantities.

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ingredients 

1 cup/200g yellow split moong dal

3 cups/750ml water

voggarane 

2 Tbsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1½ heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 dried chilli – torn in half

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

12 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

1 heaped tsp finely chopped ginger

2 medium tomato, chopped into small pieces

1 tsp fine rock salt

a small handful coriander leaves

juice from half a lemon

to serve 

cabbage carrot palya

chapati

preparation 

1.   In a bowl, wash the dal until the water runs clear, drain and refill with 3 cups water – set aside.

2.  Finely chop the tomatoes and measure out the spices for the voggarane – set aside.

prepare the voggarane 

3.  In a medium saucepan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat, add cumin seeds,  chilli and asafoetida – fry for a few seconds, then add curry leaves and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly.

4.  Add the tomato and ginger, cover and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally – fry until the tomato starts to break up.

5.  Pour in the bowl of dal and water, bring to a rapid simmer, then simmer until the dal is soft and broken down – 20 minutes. Add more water if the dal becomes too dry.

6.   Add salt, jaggery, lemon juice and garnish with fresh coriander.

Serve with chapati, a cabbage or okra palya.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

pepper rasam

26th July 2016

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Pepper Rasam is a simple and tasty liquid dish, considered tridhatus samya, balances all three doshas, vata, pitta, and kapha.  It provokes the appetite and is helpful for indigestion. It helps to reduce nausea and is beneficial for those with a high fever.  It may be consumed two or three times in a week.  It is recommended to be served with rice, a spoon of ghee and goes very well with steamed greens or a green bean palya.

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~ Evening, Praia Do Guincho

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Pepper Rasam

Preparation – 45 minutes

Serves 3 – 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Programme.  

Use heaped measurements except when stated otherwise.

ingredients

⅓ cup/65g toor dal

3 cups/750mlwater

1 tsp fine rock salt

4 tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

first voggarane

2 tsp ghee 

½ tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp urad dal

½ – 1 tsp whole black peppercorns, depending on your preferred spice

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves 

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup/40g shredded dried coconut

1½ cup/375ml warm water

second voggarane 

1 tsp  ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves – torn in half

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preparation

1.  In a saucepan, wash toor dal until water runs clear, drain and pour 3 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer, uncovered until dal is soft and broken down – approximately 30 – 40 minutes.

2.  While waiting for the dal to cook, chop the coriander and measure out the spices for both voggarane – set aside.

prepare first voggarane

3.  In a small pan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, add urad dal, whole peppercorns, and cumin seeds – fry until the urad dal is golden brown. Add asafoetida, 6 curry leaves, and turmeric powder – swish or stir the pan for the spices to fry evenly, stir in the dried coconut and 1 cup water. 

4.  Pour into blender and blend until smooth – 1 minute. Add to dal, use some liquid from dal to swish blender clean.

5.  Add salt and jaggery – set aside.

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prepare second voggarane

6.  Heat remaining ghee, add cumin seeds and curry leaves – fry until the seeds are golden-brown.  Add to dal, and stir in the coriander.  

7.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes before tasting, adding more jaggery or salt, as needed.  

Serve with rice, green bean palya or sauteed greens and drizzle with a spoon of ghee.

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 Goodness shared by Stacey

toor dal rasam with carrot and sweet peas

15th May 2016

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If I move slowly and in silence and breathe long and deep, I feel my heartbeat slow and my mind clear…

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Crocosmia

– The caress & colours of Spring

– Two friends

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toor dal rasam with carrot & sweet peas

Serves 3 – 4

Rasam keeps the digestive system in good condition.  Apart from strengthening the body, it can be used when omitting the vegetables and diluting with water, as a drink to help with digestive disorders.  People, who are suffering from Vata disturbances, should not consume it very often.   It can also be prepared with split moong dal which will cause fewer disturbances for the Vata constitution.  It may be consumed at any meal-time throughout the day, in all seasons.  Rasam powder and tamarind paste are available at your local Indian Store.  If toor dal (yellow split lentils) are not available replace with split moong dal.

Use heaped measurements except where otherwise stated.

ingredients 

½ cup toor dal or split moong dal

4 cups/1-litre water

1 medium carrot, chopped

⅓ cup fresh green peas

1 tsp rasam powder (mildly spiced)

1 tsp tamarind paste 

2 heaped Tbsp jaggery

1 heaped tsp rock salt

¼ cup dried shredded unsweetened coconut

¼ cup coriander leaves, chopped 

voggarane 

2 tsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp fenugreek powder (optional)

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

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preparation

1.   In a saucepan, wash toor dal until the water runs off clear, drain, pour in the water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer, simmer uncovered for 20 minutes.  

2.  Add the carrot and sweet peas and simmer until the dal has softened – 20 minutes.

3.  Add the rasam powder, tamarind, salt, jaggery, and coconut, stir to combine well – simmer for 5 minutes.

prepare the voggarane 

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop, add asafoetida, fenugreek, curry leaves and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly.

5.  Pour the voggarane into the dal, and stir in the fresh coriander leaves. 

Allow to sit for 10 minutes for the flavours to settle and dal to thicken slightly.  Serve with rice and drizzle with ghee.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

moong dal sambar with green beans

29th July 2015

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We have had two teachers here from India teaching the Jivana Yoga Programme which takes part two mornings on the weekends.  They inspire and guide us in the areas of asana, pranayama, Samskrta, Yogic philosophy and Yogic cooking –  but we also learn so much more by just being in their grace-filled presence.

I have enjoyed cooking with Ganapati Aarya (the more senior teacher) as he is very organised and precise, so each recipe we cook is perfected down to how much liquid or grain of salt is required. He also imparts a softness, grace and calmness in any room he enters and in everything he does. At the beginning of each week, we sit and discuss which dish we will be cooking, the benefits of that dish and then a trial of that dish the next day, before cooking it again with the class on Sunday.

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These are just a few things I have learnt in his presence –

– always simmer with the lid off to eliminate any energetic impurities which may have entered the food.

– a pinch of mustard seeds is advised to add to the voggarane to cleanse the food energetically.

– always cook in a state of calm, quiet and good feeling, which will impart the same qualities in the food you will eat and serve to others.

– when passing a knife to others, always place on the ground or table, never directly in their hand as this can create quarrelling.

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moong dal sambar with green beans

When we cooked this in the class, the fresh green beans were added at the very beginning to simmer with the dal – I like to add the green beans 10 minutes before the end to keep them vital and fresh.  Any type of green bean can be used.

This dish can be made with seasonal vegetables of choice.  As a guideline, beetroot, cabbage and beans are recommended to be used by themselves, and carrot and capsicum are recommended to be combined with other vegetables.  The mixing of too many vegetables will result in an unsuitable taste when making a sambar.  Instead of the whole mung dal – moong dal split or toor dal can also be used.

This dish is good for all constitutions in all seasons and may be consumed at any time of the day.  It balances kapha, vata and pitta.  Sambar can be eaten with rice, dosa, chapati or pori. 

ingredients 

½ cup/100g whole moong dal 

6 cups water – divided

2½ cups/275g green beans, chopped into small uniformed pieces

1½ heaped tsp fine Himalayan rock salt

2 heaped tsp sugar/jaggery

sambar-coconut paste

2½ tsp sambar powder – moderately spiced

cup dried shredded coconut

1 tsp tamarind paste

voggarane

2 tsp ghee 

½ tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

15 curry leaves

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup coriander leaves, chopped

preparation 

1.  In a medium saucepan, wash the dāl until the water runs clear, drain and pour in 5 cups water, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer, uncovered for 15 minutes.

2.  Add the beans and simmer until the vegetables are soft and dāl has broken down – 30 minutes.  

3.  When the dal has softened, turn off the heat and add salt and jaggery.

prepare the sambar-coconut paste 

4.  Place in an upright blender, the dried coconut, tamarind paste, sambar powder and remaining 1 cup water. Blend into a smooth paste – 1 minute. 

5.  Add the paste to the dal.  Swish the blender clean using liquid from the dal.  

voggarane 

6.  In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, heat the ghee, add mustard seeds; when they turn grey and pop, add the asafoetida, curry leaves and turmeric – fry for 1 minute, swishing the pan around for the spices to fry evenly. 

7.  Pour the voggarane into the sambar and allow to simmer for a few minutes. 

8.  Add the coriander and let to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to meld together. Taste adding more sweet, salt or sour. Serve with a drizzling of ghee.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

green gram tovve (split moong dal)

9th July 2015

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precious evening twilight

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“Every thought you produce, anything you say, any action you do, bears your signature.”

~Thich Nhat Hahn~
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soothing split moong dal

Serves 3 

Inspired by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya.

I have been making this a lot lately, sometimes as a soup or other times with rice and a simple palya. Drizzled with ghee, it is a complete soothing, easy to digest and cleansing meal. Brings strength, balance along with calmness and quietness to the body and mind. Helpful to the elderly and due to its lightness can be used during a period of sickness. Supports the yogic practice.

I like to add thinly sliced cabbage or chuchu and grated carrot just towards the end of cooking. If using whole moong dal instead of the split decrease the amount of dal to ½ cup and proceed with the recipe.

ingredients 

¾ cup/125g moong dal split (split yellow lentils)

4 cups/1-litre water

1 tsp rock salt 

1½ tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 heaped tsp finely chopped ginger

voggarane 

1 Tbsp  ghee

½ heaped tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli

10 fresh/dried curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

¼ cup coriander leaves, finely chopped

to serve

vegetable palya

rice

preparation 

1.  In a medium saucepan, wash dal until the water runs clear, pour in water and bring to boil, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer until creamy and the dal has broken down – approximately 30 minutes. 

If using a pressure cooker, allow for three whistles before turning off the heat, then set aside for 20 minutes or until the pressure has subsided.

2.  While waiting for the dal to cook, chop the chilli into three pieces and tear the curry leaves in half (this way everyone is guaranteed to consume a curry leaf and benefit from their medicinal properties).

3.  Once the dal has softened, add salt, jaggery, coconut and ginger – simmer for 5 minutes more, then turn off heat, cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane

4.  In a small pan over medium heat, heat ghee, add mustard seeds; when the seeds turn grey and pop, turn down the heat and add cumin seeds, asafoetida powder, and chilli – fry until sizzling and fragrant. 

5.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder – fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly, then pour the voggarane into the dal.

6. Stir in the lemon juice , add coriander – stir to combine.  Check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

Aytana’s winter warming dal

14th December 2014

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When we hold workshops, we host up to 12 people staying in our home and up to 16 – 20 for dinner, I draw up a timetable/roster and everyone signs up for their turn at cooking, cleaning, lighting the oil burner, refreshing flowers and the general cleanliness of the yoga room over the course of the 10-day seminar. This way all the cooking and stress is evenly distributed, and I also get to enjoy the workshop – but the best part is that I get to be inspired by other amazing cooks and enjoy their creations.

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“What we have learnt is a seed, it will grow to open a new world.”

Aytana’s Winter warming dal

This was a recipe which Aytana made one night – simple, smooth, creamy, quick and delicious. The key here is the blending/whisking of the dal at the end to create the soothing creaminess and the stewing of the tomatoes at the beginning. It is easy to digest and the light consistency makes it appealing in all seasons.  Depending on the season, I usually serve it with an okra or cabbage palya, a big bowl of steamed green beans and kale, and brown rice. Or in Summer accompanied by a crunchy salad.

Serves 4

ingredients 

1 cup yellow moong dal, split

4 cups water

½ tsp turmeric powder

1 Tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped

for the voggarane

2 tsp ghee/oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 – 7 curry leaves

tsp finely chopped fresh chilli or 1 tsp of rasam powder

tsp asafoetida powder

1 cup ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

1 carrot, finely chopped

1 tsp rock salt

½ cup coriander leaves, roughly chopped 

preparation 

1.  Rinse the dal until the water runs clear, drain and add the ginger, turmeric, and 3 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce the heat – simmer for 30 – 40 minutes or until the dal is soft and has broken down.

prepare the voggarane

2.  While the dal is cooking, in a small saucepan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds; when the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the cumin seeds and fry until they brown.

3.  Add asafoetida powder, curry leaves, chilli and fry for 20 seconds.

4.  Stir in the tomatoes and carrots, cover and allow the tomatoes to stew for 20 minutes, then add the cooked dal – simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5.  Remove from heat and add salt, then beat with a wire whisk or using a hand blender, blend until smooth and creamy.

6.  Add coriander and stir to combine.  Garnish each portion with a twist of lemon and drizzling of ghee.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

tomato gojju

23rd July 2014

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Over the last few days, I have been working in the garden under slow-falling, drizzle of rain, the gentlest of winds and splashes of the warmest of sunshine.  Soaking up the rain, sun, light and listening to the morning and evening chorus, sipping warm tea on the garden bench.  Enjoying seeing all those plants, seedlings and fruits

GROW and GROW…

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I ‘m

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so

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glad

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I

get to do it

ALL

again

TODAY!

tomato gojju

Inspired by ‘Mysore Style Cooking’ by Sandhya.

I have not made these fermented mung bean patties for quite some time.  With this welcome wave of hot weather, they ferment quickly.  I soak in the night, grind in the morning and ferment all day, ready for dinner tonight.  Perfect with this tomato gojju, a simple carrot palya and guacamole.

ingredients 

3 Tbsp ghee or peanut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 Tbsp split channa dal

1 tsp split urad dal

¼ tsp asafoetida powder

1 Tbsp ginger, finely chopped 

½ red capsicum, finely chopped

8-10 curry leaves

¼ tsp turmeric powder

500g tomatoes, finely chopped

1 heaped tsp fine rock salt

1 heaped tsp jaggery/brown sugar

1 heaped tsp rasam powder (moderately spiced)

½ – 1 tsp tamarind paste

2 Tbsp coconut grated

a handful of fresh coriander, finely chopped

to serve 

mung bean pattiesdosa /rice

avocado

preparation 

1.  In a medium skillet, over medium-high heat, add mustard seeds; when they start to splutter and pop, add the channa and urad dal – fry until both dal turn golden-brown.

2.  Add the asafoetida powder and ginger – fry for a few seconds, stirring to allow the spices to fry evenly, then stir in the capsicum and curry leaves – fry for 1 minute.

3.  Add in the turmeric powder and tomatoes  – mix well, cover and cook for 15 -20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4.  Add the salt, jaggery, rasam powder, tamarind paste, coconut and fresh coriander – allow to sit for 5 minutes, taste, adding more sweet or sour, if needed.

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Goodness shared from Stacey

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