cakes & desserts

rhubarb cardamom cake with rhubarb-vanilla compote (vegan)

19th May 2019

A recipe I make often based on these Raspberry Muffins. The sweet almond crumb adds a delicious crunchy texture which contrasts nicely with the sourness of the rhubarb. The maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup brown sugar. If you don’t want to spend the time arranging the rhubarb, chop into 1 cm pieces and sprinkle over the cake.

rhubarb cardamon cake with a rhubarb-vanilla compote

Preparation 30 minutes

Baking time 45 minutes

Serves 8 – 10

for the millet

¼ cup/50g millet

½ cup/125ml water

for the almond crumb

⅓ cup/25g flaked almonds

2 Tbsp coconut sugar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

1 Tbsp lemon juice

for the cake

4 rhubarb stalks (250-300g)

1½ cup/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

1 tsp cardamom powder

¾ cup/220g maple syrup

¼ cup + 2 Tbsp/65g mild-tasting olive oil

¼ cup/55g almond milk

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

1 Tbsp grated ginger

zest of 1 lemon

¼ tsp fine rock salt

cook the millet

1.  Rinse and drain the millet, place in a small pan, add ½ cup water and salt, and bring to a boil; then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 15 minutes, covered, until the millet is cooked.

2. Turn off the heat and let sit for 5 – 10 minutes, then measure out 1 cup/180g cooked millet – set aside.

3.  Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF and line an 11 x 7-inch baking tray or favourite cake tin with parchment paper.

prepare the almond crumb

4.  In a small bowl place the almonds, sugar, maple syrup and lemon juice, stir to combine and set aside.

prepare the rhubarb

5.   Unless the rhubarb stalks are very slender, cut them in half lengthwise, then cut the stalks at an angle, two pointing one way and the other two the opposite so that they will fit together in a herringbone pattern. Use your pan to do a trial run, cutting to size and arranging your stalks however you like – set aside.  

prepare the cake

6.  In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and cardamom – set aside.

7.  In a medium jug, whisk together the maple syrup, olive oil, almond milk, vanilla, ginger, lemon zest, salt and cooked millet.

8.  Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the wet ingredients, stir until well combined – be careful not to over-mix.

9.  Spread the batter evenly into the pan and arrange the rhubarb stalks on top. Spend a little extra time arranging your rhubarb – this is my favourite part! Don’t press the fruit into the batter – just place over the top and let it rest on the surface.

10. Crumble over the almond crumb. 

11.  Bake for 40 – 45 minutes, until golden or a toothpick comes out clean. Remove and allow to cool.  Make the compote.

Serve with a generous dollop of Greek yoghurt or cream and a spoon of rhubarb-vanilla compote.

rhubarb-vanilla compote

Preparation – 25 minutes

Makes 1 cup

ingredients

2 cups/225g rhubarb, diced (use the redder part of the stems)

⅓ cup/90g maple syrup

½ tsp freshly grated ginger

½ vanilla bean, split lengthwise

preparation

1.  Place the rhubarb, maple syrup, ginger and in a medium saucepan.

2.  Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean into a saucepan, adding the pod as well.

3.  Cook, covered over low heat. (It’s important to begin slowly so the rhubarb warms up and begins to release its liquid. Cook the rhubarb for about 15 minutes.

4.  Remove the cover and increase heat to medium. Cook for 5 minutes more, stirring occasionally until the rhubarb is completely broken down.

4.  Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

5-minute vegan salted caramel

2nd May 2019

A very simple sweet salty gooey 5-minute caramel sauce to drizzle warm over ice-cream, pancakes or crumble the base of a bowl with a 5-ingredient tahini almond cookie, add a scoop of vanilla ice cream, a sprinkling of toasted pistachio nuts, drizzle over the caramel sauce and garnish with fresh mint leaves. Perfect for Pesach Celebrations!

~spring vegetable garden~

5-minute vegan salted caramel

Recipe inspired here.

Preparation time 5 minutes

Makes 1 cup

ingredients

⅓ cup/75g hulled tahini 

⅓ cup/70g coconut cream

⅓ cup/50g coconut sugar

¼ tsp fine rock salt

2 Tbsp coconut oil

2 tsp water, or more for desired consistency

½ tsp vanilla extract

to serve

vanilla ice-cream

5-ingredient tahini almond cookies

toasted pistachios

preparation

1.  Mix all the ingredients together, except the vanilla in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat, until sugar is dissolved, stirring continuously.

2.  Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla extract.

3.  For a more syrupy, drippy consistency, once cool, whisk in water 1 tsp at a time until desired consistency is reached. Enjoy immediately!  Can be stored refrigerated up to a week.

The sauce will set once it is cooled so you will need to reheat it to regain a pourable consistency or add in hot water until the desired consistency.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

28th January 2019

This cake recipe was shared via Kristin, who had received it from our dearest friend Mary. Mary is at the heart of our community, guiding us on this yogic path and as things progress she continues to be a joy-filled light leading the way for us all. I had the privilege of baking this cake with Leela (Mary’s daughter) while visiting Mary and her family in Boulder.

Heartfelt gratitude to Kristin for sharing this recipe with us and thank-you Leela for such an experience of contentment and joy in playful baking together. Such grace!

This cake actually improves with time, this allows the flavours to come together. You can serve it with yoghurt as a simple dessert, or with a cup of kashaya at the end of the meal. It is moist yet light in texture and aromatic with lemon.

Mary’s lemon semolina cake

Preparation  – 10 minutes

Baking time –  30 minutes

Serves 8 – 10

ingredients

½ cup/65g whole wheat flour or coconut flour

1½ tsp baking powder

1 cup/170g fine semolina

¼ + 2 Tbsp/75g raw sugar

½ cup/90g coconut oil

¾ cup/180g plain yoghurt

1 lemon, zest and juice

for the syrup

¼ cup/50g sugar

½ cup water

1 lemon, zest and juice

for garnishing

shredded coconut

icing powder

extra lemon zest

to prepare the cake

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan lightly with ghee or coconut oil. Set aside.

2.  In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, semolina and sugar, stir to combine – set aside.

3.  In a small pan over low heat slowly melt the coconut oil, remove from heat and stir in the yoghurt, lemon juice and zest.

4.  Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients – fold together until well combined, then using a spatula, scrape the batter into the greased cake pan and smooth or press down the top.

5.  Bake for about 30 minutes, until lightly golden, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

prepare the syrup

6.  Near the end of the baking time prepare the syrup. Place the sugar and water in a small saucepan and mix well with a wooden spoon, bring the syrup up to the boil, add the lemon juice and zest – simmer gently for 1 minute or until the sugar has dissolved. Remove the syrup from the heat, and set aside until the cake is ready.

to finish the cake

7.  Once the cake is cooked, remove it from the oven – set aside to cool.

8.  Use a small, sharp knife to cut the cake down the centre, then 2 parallel lines either side 3 – 4 cm apart, followed by another set of lines at a 45-degree angle, creating a diamond pattern.

9.  Drizzle the syrup evenly over the cake and sprinkle with shredded coconut and icing sugar. Allow the cake to sit a few hours to allow the flavours to mingle.

Goodness shared by Stacey

Baked and assisted by Leela

Artwork by Kristin

ginger peach muffins (vegan)

24th July 2018

New MOON dip.

“The leaves of the lotus are emergent, meaning that they rise above the water level whereas the leaves of water-lily are found floating on the water surface. Same is true for their respective flowers; lotus flowers are emergent and water-lily flowers are floating.”

Monserrate Pond, Sintra

ginger peach muffins

Makes 12 muffins

Adapted from ‘Good to the Grain’ by Kim Boyce.

‘Ripe peaches, cooked briefly in ginger syrup, are spooned over muffins made with soft, mellow oat flour and minced candied ginger. Be sure to use peaches that are slightly tart and not so ripe that they’ll break apart in the pan. Allow time for the muffins to cool before eating, as the oat flour can be moist when warm’. – Kim Boyce. 

ingredients

2 Tbsp chia seeds

½ cup nut milk (almond, rice etc.)

peach topping 

2 medium/310g firm, ripe peaches

1 Tbsp ghee/coconut oil

2 Tbsp brown sugar/maple syrup

1 heaped tsp freshly grated ginger

dry ingredients 

¾ cup/75g oat flour

¾ cup/100g whole wheat flour

¾ cup/100g unbleached white flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

¼ cup/50g light brown fine sugar

½ cup/75g dark brown sugar

¼ tsp fine rock salt

wet ingredients 

¾ cup/185ml nut milk (almond, rice, etc)

 cup/80ml mild-tasting olive/coconut oil

1 Tbsp vanilla essence

2 heaped Tbsp grated ginger

3 Tbsp/35g finely chopped crystallized ginger

preparation 

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Rub a muffin tin with butter or oil.

2.  Whisk the chia seeds and almond milk together in a medium bowl; set aside for 10 minutes to thicken.

3.  Grate the ginger, you will need 2 heaped tablespoons plus 1 tsp – divided.

for the peach topping

4.  Halve the peaches, remove the seeds, cut into quarters and then each quarter into three slices about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.

5.  In a large skillet over medium heat, add the ghee/oil, sugar and 1 heaped teaspoon grated ginger, melt the mixture, stirring to combine. Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes.

6.  Add the peaches, toss the pan to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

for the cake

7.  Whisk together the oat flour, whole-wheat flour, unbleached white flour, baking powder, sugars and salt in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

8.  In a separate mixing bowl, combine the chia mixture, nut milk, olive oil, vanilla essence, remaining grated ginger and finely chopped crystallized ginger.

9.  Combine the wet and dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix.

10.  Scoop the batter into 12-muffin cups, using a spoon or an ice-cream scoop, fill only a little bit over halfway, as the batter will rise when the peaches are placed on top.

11.  Toss the peaches to coat them with the pan juices and individually lay one slice of peach over each of the muffins, tucking the second slice partway into the batter. Any extra peaches can be served with the muffins. Spoon the pan juices over the muffins.

12.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through. The muffins are ready when they are golden and the edges of the peaches are caramelized. These muffins are best eaten the day they are made.

Serve with a dollop of cream or Greek yoghurt and remaining peaches.

pear & ginger cornmeal cake (vegan)

14th January 2018

Just a few months ago we moved all the Jivana Yoga classes from our living room in the main house to the new ‘Sadvidya Space’ located at the very back of the property.  It is a beautiful, wild, and natural space overlooking the fruit orchard and the vegetable garden. To get there it is quite a journey, entering through a unassuming green door, stepping into and away from the hustle and bustle of old Sintra; you then weave your way past the main house, following the signs that lead along a cobbled stoned path through a lush green forest full of moss, all the while listening to the soft and sweet melody of the birds above.

Already something of yourself has softened and a natural quietness begins to present itself from within. You continue to pass an old chapel canopied under richly, scented eucalyptus trees which loom above, and there you find yourself at a door of the ‘Sadvidya Space’ where one can enter into the warmth and escape the attraction of the external world to travel inwards for a few hours.

I like to think of this journey from the ‘Green Door’ to the ‘Space’ as preparation for our inward practice, helping us to begin to let go along the way.  This is also where I like to test my new recipes and serve them after class to our lovely group on Saturday mornings. This pear and ginger cornmeal cake disappeared very quickly.  

´The Sadvidya Space´

pear & ginger cornmeal cake

8  servings

The ginger and pear are perfect together and the ginger is subtle enough that it lingers. A very easy dessert for morning or to prepare for a large group.  I like to bake this in a wider baking tray (6.5-inch x 10.5-inch) almost like a slice if using a smaller tray or skillet the cake may need more cooking time.

pear topping :

4 small/370g small firm pears

2 Tbsp butter/ghee/coconut oil

2 Tbsp brown sugar

dry ingredients :

1 cup/135g cornmeal

½ cup/75g whole wheat flour

½ cup/75g unbleached white flour

2 tsp baking powder

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 heaped tsp ginger powder

wet ingredients :

¼ cup soy milk/almond milk

¼ cup olive oil

¾ cup maple syrup (maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup sugar, increase almond milk to ½ cup instead of ¼)

2 Tbsp finely chopped crystallized ginger

garnishing:

2 Tbsp brown sugar

½ cup roughly chopped macadamia nuts

preparation :

1.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Line a baking pan or round 8- to 9- inch cast iron skillet.

for the pear topping:

2.  Halve the pears, remove the seeds, and slice each half into fours about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.

3.  In a large skillet add the butter/oil and sugar, place the skillet over medium heat and melt the mixture, stirring to combine – cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes.

4.  Add the pears, toss the pan to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

for the cake:

5.  Whisk together the cornmeal, whole wheat flour, unbleached white flour, baking powder, salt and ginger powder in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

6.  In a separate mixing bowl, combine the nut milk, olive oil, maple syrup, and the finely chopped crystallized ginger.

7.  Combine the wet and dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix, pour into the baking dish or oiled skillet, you may need to spread the batter out with a spatula.

8.  Toss the pears to coat them with the pan juices and individually lay the pear slices decoratively in even rows over the top of the batter, drizzle with the remaining pan juices. Sprinkle with a little brown sugar and the roughly chopped macadamia nuts.

9.  Bake until golden for approximately 35 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Serve with a dollop of cream or Greek yoghurt.

Goodness shared by Stacey

carrot cake – vegan

9th November 2017

There are two ways to serve this cake. The first, for a special occasion and serving it with decadent cashew cream, the second, without the cream and giving it a warm earthiness by sprinkling the top of the cake with 2 extra tablespoons sesame seeds and the roughly chopped raw walnuts before baking. Both ways are delicious.

As a general rule, all nuts are heating. In Ayurveda, it is recommended to eat sparingly, especially cashews as they provoke Pitta and because of their thought-provoking qualities can disturb the sleep and meditation.

sesame-seeded carrot cake

Inspired by the much-loved Spice Cake.

The cardamom adds a rich warmth, so it is important to grind your own as the taste is so much more fragrant, fresher and more intense. 

cashew cream 

1 cup/140g cashew, soaked for 4 hours or overnight

¼ cup coconut cream (the cream from the top of a can of coconut milk)

1 Tbsp coconut oil

1 vanilla bean

2 – 4 Tbsp maple syrup

ingredients for the cake 

2 Tbsp sesame seeds – for sprinkling inside the greased pan

½ cup/50g walnuts – for garnishing

2 cups/210g tightly packed grated carrots (approx 2 medium)

dry ingredients 

1 cup/120g whole-wheat flour

1 cup/120g unbleached white flour

2 tsp baking powder

1½ tsp baking soda

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 heaped tsp cardamom powder

2 heaped tsp ground cinnamon powder

wet ingredients 

½ cup/125ml melted coconut oil/mild-tasting olive oil

1 cup/250ml maple syrup (can replace with 1 cup/180g brown sugar )

¼ cup/45g brown/coconut sugar.

½ cup/125ml hulled tahini paste

½ cup/250ml soy/almond milk

1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

½ cup/80g golden sultanas/raisins

prepare the cashew cream 

1.  For the cream, soak the cashews for at least 4 hours or overnight in cold water.

2.  Drain, rinse and place in a high-speed blender.

3.  Split the vanilla bean down its length, scrape the seeds into the blender, along with the coconut cream, coconut oil and maple syrup, blend until creamy and smooth. Taste and adjust the amount of maple syrup.

4.  Transfer the cream to a bowl, cover and place in the fridge until ready to use.

prepare the cake 

1.  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C. Oil a 9-inch springform pan or a baking dish with oil. Sprinkle the sesame seeds around the sides and bottom of the pan.

2.  Spread the walnuts on a baking tray and bake for 10 minutes.  While they are still warm, rub the nuts gently in a towel to remove the skins.  Inevitably there will be some skins that refuse to peel away, but no matter.  Roughly chop, and set aside.

3.  Wash the carrots and grate either using a box grater or your food processor (using the smaller grater attachment). Set aside.

4.  In a medium bowl, sift together the dry ingredients –  flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and spices. Whisk to combine.

5.  In another medium bowl, combine the wet ingredients – oil, maple syrup, sugar, tahini, soy/almond milk and vinegar. Whisk until the wet ingredients are emulsified.

6.  Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry, whisking together just until all the dry ingredients are absorbed. The batter will be quite wet.

7.  Stir in the grated carrot and sultanas, fold gently with a spatula to combine.

8.  Pour the batter into the oiled pan and place in the oven. Bake about 50 – 60 minutes, or until the cake is springy to the touch and a toothpick comes out clean. If the top looks like it’s getting dark, but the inside needs more time, cover loosely with aluminium foil for the last 10 minutes of baking.

9.  When the cake is completely cool and you are ready to serve. Spread the cashew cream evenly over the top of the cake. Decorate the cake with the toasted walnuts and long strips of carrot peel. To keep the carrot strips from discolouring, toss in a little lemon juice before placing on the cake.

Serve within a few hours of frosting otherwise, it is best to keep the cake refrigerated or to frost only when ready to serve.

raspberry quinoa muffins with an almond crumb (vegan)

30th April 2017

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This garden breathes beautifully of our time here……

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and deeply grateful for the gifts it has given……

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raspberry quinoa muffins with an almond crumb

Makes 10 muffins.

A recipe I make often based on this Plum Millet Cake, the sweet almond crumb adds a delicious crunchy texture which contrasts nicely with the sourness of the raspberries. These muffins are tender, fragrant and light.  The maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup brown sugar.

I made my own muffin liners by tearing up  12 x 12 cm square pieces of baking paper and pressing them down into the tray – if you grease the tin beforehand the liners behave nicely.

If you don’t have a muffin tin, this recipe can also be made as a cake, may need to increase the baking time.

for the quinoa

¼ cup/50g quinoa

½ cup/125ml water

for the almond crumb

cup/30g flaked almonds

2 Tbsp brown sugar/coconut sugar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

for the cake

1½ cup/210g whole-spelt flour

1 Tbsp aluminium-free baking powder

¾ cup/185ml maple syrup

¼ cup + 2 tablespoons/90ml mild-tasting olive oil

¼ cup/60ml almond milk

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

zest of 1 lemon

¼ tsp fine rock salt

150g frozen/fresh raspberries

cook the quinoa

1.  Rinse and drain the quinoa, place in a small pan, add ½ cup water, and bring to a boil; then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer – simmer for 15 – 20 minutes, uncovered, until the water has evaporated.

2. Turn off the heat; cover and let sit for 10 minutes, then measure out 1 cup/130g cooked quinoa – set aside.

3.  Preheat the oven to 180C/350F and fill a muffin tray with 10 liners.

prepare the almond crumb

4.  In a small bowl place the flaked almonds, sugar and maple syrup, stir to combine – set aside.

prepare the cake

5.  In a large bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder; set aside.

6.  In a medium jug, whisk together the maple syrup, olive oil, almond milk, vanilla, lemon zest, salt and cooked quinoa.

7.  Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture and pour in the wet ingredients, and using a rubber spatula, stir until well combined, then gently fold in the raspberries – be careful not to over-mix.

8.  Scoop the batter into muffin cups, filling them all the way to the top using a spoon or an ice cream scoop.  Spoon a teaspoon of the almond crumb on top of each muffin.

9.  Bake for 30 – 35 minutes, until golden or a toothpick comes out clean. Take the muffins out of the tin and place them on a wire rack to cool.

Serve with a generous dollop of Greek yoghurt.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

kaseri bath – sweet upma

12th February 2017

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Satyam, sivam and sundaram.

Truth, sacredness, and beauty are three most important characteristics seen through the universe. They come from the Eternal Truth and are contained in everything to a greater or lesser extent. Happiness takes shelter under their protection.  Violence can utterly spoil them.  When we intentionally violate these qualities we violate Truth. It is, therefore, our duty to preserve and maintain them.

~ The sacred Tradition of Yoga – Dr Shankaranarayana Jois

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A recipe shared by our teacher last year as part of The Jivana Yoga Programme, we are fortunate to be graced with their presence here in Portugal.  Their presence in our home and lives leaves a profound effect on our daily existence and our practices become that little bit more concrete and established on this yogic path.

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Kaseri Bath – Sweet Upma

Preparation 40 minutes

Serves 8 – 10 small servings

Kaseri Bath is especially recommended for Yoga practitioners.  It calms the mind and keeps it fresh.  It may be used by all constitutions.  Kaseri Bath can be served as part of the main meal and it is especially recommended to be served with Upma or Idli.  Best served warm, it is the Indian tradition to start with the sweet first.  Depending on the type of sugar used, the taste and colour may vary. Instead of bananas, apple or pineapple can be used.

ingredients 

1½ cups/350ml warm water

1 pinch saffron – 15 threads

½ cup/125ml ghee – melted

10 cashew

10 almonds

1 cup/170g semolina

¼ cup/35g raisins

3 medium/200g bananas

¼ tsp fine rock salt

1 cup/205g light brown sugar 

6 cardamom pods  – ¼ tsp 

preparation 

1.  Place the saffron threads in warm water to steep for 15 minutes.

2.  Cut the almonds into 3 pieces and the cashew nuts into 2 pieces. Peel and cut the bananas into 1 cm pieces.  Remove the hard shell from the cardamom, and place the small black seeds in a mortar and pestle, grind into a fine powder – set aside.

3. Over medium heat, pour the ghee into a medium-sized skillet, add almonds, cashews and semolina – stir continuously for 10 minutes, or until the cashews have turned golden-brown.

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4.  Pour in the saffron water, add the raisins, chopped banana and salt – stir continuously for 3 minutes.  

5.  Add the sugar, after about 30 seconds of stirring the Kaseri Bath will become considerably softer and liquid in consistency, and then will thicken slightly again. This process will take approximately  2-3 minutes, of continually stirring; or until the sugar has dissolved.  While stirring, once you feel the Kaseri Bath is thicker in consistency and starts to slide away from the pan – it is ready. 

6.  Turn off the heat, stir in the cardamom powder, mixing well. 

Allow the Kaseri Bath to rest for a minute and for the flavours to deepen.  Serve warm.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

almond quinoa & chocolate bars (vegan)

21st September 2016

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Cool softened air, full mOOn swell, falling leaves, savouring the light….

almond mandela - 1 (2)almond mandela - 1 (3) almond mandela - 1 (2)

These have been a decadent treat around here.  Loved by all.  Perfect when you need something more than a dried date or fig for a sweet after a meal.  Based on this recipe from Green Kitchen Stories – a wonderful video is included showing you just how easy they are to make.  I altered the recipe slightly, adding ¼ cup hot water to the dates when mashing them. Even though the dates I used were soft, the hot water helped in the overall consistency. Instead of pumpkin seeds, I used extra almonds and toasted them to make them snappy and to bring out their flavour. I prefer using just almonds, as their qualities are less heating than most other nuts and seeds.  You could use a carob topping instead of the chocolate, by melting down carob buttons or using this glaze.

almond butter quinoa chocolate bars - 1 (1)

almond quinoa & chocolate bars

The secret ingredient is well-toasted homemade almond butter – make your own!

Preparation 20 minutes

Makes 16 squares/32 bites sized squares.

ingredients

½ cup/55 g whole almonds

200g soft Medjool dates (11 dates)-pitted

2 Tbsp coconut oil

¼ cup/60ml hot water

1 cup/240g home-made almond butter

1 cup/30g puffed quinoa

chocolate topping

100g dark chocolate (55%)

3 Tbsp dried unsweetened coconut

preparation

1.  Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.

Line a 7 x 7 – inch baking tray with baking paper, leaving 2 inches around the edges – set aside.

2.  Place the whole almonds on a tray and toast for 8 minutes – allow to cool, roughly chop and set aside.

3.  Melt the coconut oil in a medium saucepan over low heat, remove from heat and add the dates, pour in the hot water, allow to sit for five minutes to soften, then proceed to mash with a fork until smooth.

4.  Mix in the almond butter – combine well until it all comes together.

5.  Add the puffed quinoa, roasted almonds, incorporating everything evenly.

6.  Using your hands or the back of a large spoon, press the mixture very tightly into the lined dish, until completely even and flat. Use the edges of the baking paper, to fold over and run your finger along the edges to create level sides and corners – set aside.

chocolate topping

7.  Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over barely simmering water, remove from heat, then using a spatula, spread the chocolate evenly over the slice. Sprinkle with half the shredded coconut, leaving the other half to sprinkle on later.

8.  Place in the freezer for at least four hours, until cold and firm.

9.  Using a sharp knife, cut into bite-sized squares or rectangular bars. Store in an airtight container in the freezer. The bars will keep for a month.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

blackberry – acai popsicle (vegan)

2nd September 2016

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A gorgeous coloured blackberry sorbet in celebration with the season, with the added benefits of acai – a recipe for the Holmes Place magazine; an ongoing concept of ‘superfoods ‘ throughout the year.

‘Acai is a rich, deep purple fruit which is similar in shape to a grape and has a mild chocolate berry sweetness. These berries grow in huge clusters near the tops of palm trees, which grow in the Amazon rain forests. Each Acai berry contains just 10% fruit and pulp and a large seed, which has no benefits, so harvesting this fruit is laborious since the tree has no branches and each cluster of berries needs to be cut and brought down manually in order to preserve the fruit and pulp.  Within the nutritional pulp and skin, Acai berries are packed with antioxidants, amino acids, fibre, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. It helps to increase your antioxidant levels, boosts your energy levels, supports your immune system and helps to promote a healthy digestive system.’

There are three basic ways to add acai to a recipe: acai powder, acai juice and acai frozen smoothie packs. Here, I choose to use the powder which is more widely available and which has been freeze-dried instantly to preserve the active components and is not overly processed. The powder can be added to smoothies, juices, home-made ice creams, sprinkled over your morning porridge or added into raw treats.

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~home~

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Blackberry-Acai Popsicle

Makes 9 small popsicles

If you don’t have blackberries, try a different berry variety, blueberries, raspberries or even strawberries.  For a creamier sorbet, replace the apple juice with coconut cream by refrigerating a tin of coconut milk, & scooping out the white thick cream on top.   If you don’t have access to acai powder, it can be easily omitted. 

ingredients

3 cups fresh blackberries, washed

2 medium ripe frozen bananas

½ cup unsweetened apple juice or fruit juice of choice

2 teaspoon acai powder

2 Tblsp natural sweetener of choice (coconut sugar, maple syrup or honey)

preparation

1.  Wash the berries and place in a high-speed blender or food processor, along with the peeled frozen bananas, apple juice, & acai powder – blend until smooth and creamy, stopping if you need to push the fruit down with a rubber spatula.  

2.  Taste, and add sweetener, if required.  Blend again to incorporate the sweet.

3.  Spoon or pour into your popsicle holders, and freeze until firm or enjoy as is, for an instant treat. When ready, pull the popsicle out of their moulds by running them under some warm water. 

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References – https://www.victoriahealth.com/editorial/facts-and-myths-about-acai-berry

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