winter

5 ingredient almond & tahini cookies (vegan)

17th October 2018

Deliciously moor-ish satisfying cookies that are chewy on the inside (due to the fluid stretchy nature of tahini) and crispy, crumbly on the outside (due to the almond meal).

~the relief and release of autumn

5 ingredient almond & tahini cookies

Makes 15 cookies

Recipe from Cook Republic.

I have written this recipe as is from the link above, as most people preferred them that way.  My son and I needed more sweet, so the second and third time I baked these –

  • I added 2 Tablespoons(35g) of light brown sugar and found them just right in balancing the bitterness of the tahini.
  • Lastly, I baked them 5 minutes longer and left them in the oven for a further 20 minutes as opposed to 5 minutes.

If wanting to use unrefined brown sugar instead of the maple syrup, dissolve ½ cup sugar in ½ cup hot water and proceed with the recipe or for less sweet, ¼ cup sugar – ¼ cup water.

Almond meal is finely ground almonds. I grind whole almonds in my food processor or vita-mix.

I use a traditional brand of Tahini which is runny and smooth.

ingredients:

2 cups/225g almond meal

¾ cup/200g tahini paste

½ cup/130g maple syrup

½ tsp fine rock salt

2 tsp vanilla extract

chopped pistachio, almonds or sesame – to garnish

preparation:

Preheat the oven to 170C/340F. Line a baking tray with baking paper.

Place the tahini, maple syrup, salt and vanilla in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan on medium heat. Heat for a few minutes, stirring constantly until smooth and blended. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 10 – 15 minutes.

Add the almond meal to the tahini mixture and mix until a rough dough forms. Allow it to sit for a few minutes for the dough to come together.

Roll 1 – 2 tablespoons (40g) of the dough in the palm of your hand into a ball. (My dough was quite oily due to the runny tahini I used). Place on the prepared tray and garnish the cookies by gently pressing the nuts or seeds on top with your fingertips. 

Bake in the pre-heat oven for approximately 10 minutes. Switch off the oven and let the cookies brown slightly in the hot oven for another 5 minutes before removing.

Cool on wire racks.

bisi bele bath – revisited

13th April 2018

I thought I would revisit some of my favourite recipes which I make weekly and update to our personal preferences. This is one dish I love to eat in the cooler months (which in Sintra is the most part of the year).

Once I start eating a warm bowl of Bisi Bele Bath a feeling of being present warms and soothes the system, satisfying all six tastes.

~ waiting for Spring

bisi bele bath

Serves 3 

This dish nourishes the body and suits all constitutions. It is recommended to consume in the colder months. During warmer months, it will be heavier for the body. People with Vata disorder or digestion problems should not consume very often.

ingredients :

½ cup/90g toor dal (yellow lentils)

6 cups/1½ litres water

1 medium/80g carrot, chopped

1 medium/110g potato, peeled & chopped

1 cup/80g cabbage/green beans – roughly chopped

½ cup/100g white basmati rice

10 curry leaves

sambar-coconut paste:

¼ cup/25g dried unsweetened coconut

1 heaped Tblsp/18g mildly spiced sambar powder (use 1 tsp heaped if the powder is spicy)

1½ cup/375ml water – divided

.

1 heaped Tblsp/15g jaggery/ brown sugar

1 heaped tsp fine rock salt

1 tsp tamarind paste

1 heaped tsp ghee

¼ cup/30g frozen green peas

¼ cup chopped fresh coriander

for the voggarane :

1 tsp ghee

heaped tsp black mustard seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

preparation :

Wash and prepare vegetables.

In a medium saucepan, wash the toor dal several times until water runs clear – then drain. Pour 6 cups water into a saucepan and bring to boil over a high-heat, skim off any foam which accumulates on the top and simmer for 5 minutes, then add the chopped vegetables, reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated). Simmer rapidly until the dal is starting to soften – depending on the brand of dal, approximately 15 minutes.

Rinse the rice in a few changes of water and add to the dal and vegetables along with the curry leaves, rapidly simmer for 20 minutes more or until the rice is sufficiently cooked. You may have to add more water. Prepare the sambar-coconut paste.

sambar-coconut paste:

In an upright blender, place the dried coconut, sambar powder and pour in 1 cup of water. Blend on high for one minute.

Pour into the dal and rice, adding ½ cup water to the blender to rinse out any left-overs. Simmer for 5 minutes, adding more water if needed. Turn off the heat and add the jaggery/sugar, tamarind, salt, a spoon of ghee along with the green peas. Stir, cover and allow to sit undisturbed for 5 minutes. It will thicken as it sits.

prepare the voggarane:

In a small pan/bandalei over medium heat, add the ghee, once hot add mustard seeds; as the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around allowing spices to fry evenly. Pour voggarane into dal, and stir in chopped coriander leaves.

Taste, adding more salt, sambar powder, sweetener or tamarind. To serve, spoon into bowls with a scoop of yoghurt and a drizzling of melted ghee.

Goodness shared by Stacey

golden pistachio cardamom cookies (vegan)

15th March 2018

Because these cookies contain very little flour, they are a bit crumbly to mould.  I used a heaped round Tablespoon measure of the mixture and then flatten them out with damp fingers.  If you find the mixture sticking, dip the spoon in water and then use damp fingers to push the edges in if they are breaking away.  If you prefer a cookie crunchy on the outside and softer texture on the inside – just scoop to keep the dome-shape and skip the flattening process.  You can easily replace the sultanas with gojji or cranberries berries.

 golden pistachio cardamom cookies

Makes approx 31 cookies – two trays.

Grind your own cardamom as the taste is so much more fragrant. An easy way to do this is to place 18 cardamom pods in a high-speed blender or coffee grinder, and roughly grind. Use a strainer to sift the ground pods, discard the shells and grind bigger chunks again to a finer powder.

Inspired by these cookies and this recipe.

ingredients:

⅓ cup/60g golden sultanas

½ cup/65g raw unsalted pistachio nuts

cup/120g whole-spelt flour

1 ½ cup/130g fine regular rolled oats

3 Tblsp/25g sesame seeds

¼ tsp fine rock salt

½ tsp aluminium-free baking powder

1 tsp cardamom powder

1 tsp ginger powder

cup + 1 Tblsp maple syrup

½ cup coconut oil/olive oil

zest of two oranges

preparation:

Preheat oven 180C/350F.

Line two baking sheet with parchment paper.

Place the sultanas in a bowl, add boiling water to cover and soak for 10 minutes. Pour through a strainer, and set aside to drain well. (The extra moisture will help prevent them from burning and drying out when baking.)

Place the pistachio nuts on a tray and toast for approximately 8 minutes.  Allow to cool, roughly chop and place in a medium bowl, along with the spelt flour, oats, sesame seeds, salt, baking powder, cardamom and ginger powder.  Mix to combine and set aside.

Melt the coconut oil over a low heat until liquid, mix with the maple syrup; whisk until emulsified.  Pour into the dry ingredients and stir well, add the drained sultanas, orange zest and mix until well combined.

Use a slightly wet round Tablespoon measurement to scoop the cookie dough pressing against the side of the bowl to compact and place onto the baking sheet, flatten with damp fingers. If the mixture starts to stick, dip the spoon between intervals into the water. It is helpful to have a bowl of water nearby.

Bake for 16 – 18 minutes, rotating the baking tray halfway through. The cookies are ready to come out when they are deeply golden. Cool the cookies on a rack while you bake the rest of the dough. They will firm up when completely cool and are best eaten the day they are made.

Goodness shared by Stacey

anne´s magical sesame-tahini-ginger dressing

18th February 2018

Our Christmas and New Year were spent up in the beautiful, snowy mountains of Boulder visiting our oldest and dearest friends. As soon as we arrived, a daily ritual was naturally established, of cooking and sharing meals together, morning and evening communed around a big table and warm fire. On these nights Anne would arrive with a basket of organic salad greens which she would chop up and serve drizzled with this magical tahini dressing. This dressing is special and adds a delicious splash of flavours to anything you put it on. Whenever I make it, it transports me back to those special evenings shared with like-minded friends.

 anne´s magical sesame- tahini- ginger dressing

Makes about 2 cups

I like to tear up some bitter tasting leaves from the garden, add a sliced pear and a handful of nuts and seeds and there’s a quick salad or steam some kale leaves, greens beans or broccoli. For a more substantial meal cook up a pot of brown rice, roast some seasonal vegetables and drizzle over this dressing. It is guaranteed to add a bit of magic to any dish.

ingredients:

3 Tblsp lightly toasted sesame seeds

¼ cup white miso

½ cup hulled tahini

1 tsp toasted sesame oil

1 Tblsp honey

½ a lemon zested

juice of ½ a lemon

1-inch grated ginger

2 Tblsp raw apple cider vinegar

½ tsp flaked dulse (optional)

¼ cup water

¼ – ½ cup olive oil

preparation:

In a small saucepan over medium heat lightly toast the sesame seeds until they start popping, keep toasting for another minute. Remove from heat and set aside for the seeds to cool.

In a medium jar, place the miso and tahini, stir well until pasty and incorporated, stir in the sesame oil and honey. Remove the zest from half a lemon and squeeze the lemon juice into the bowl, add the grated ginger, apple cider vinegar and if using, the dulse flakes. Stir well to combine adding the water until the dressing comes together. Add the cooled toasted sesame seeds.

Pour in the olive oil and whisk until smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust the seasonings until you have a pleasing balance of fat and acid. The ideal consistency is that of pouring cream; stir in some water, or little more oil, until it runs easily off a spoon.

tortellini with roasted pumpkin and sage butter

30th January 2018

Making tortellini does require a little patience and time, however, the final result is worth every fiddly moment and if you get everyone on board in the assembly line filling up the table, it speeds up the process and allows for a wonderfully intimate and fun afternoon together.

tortellini with roasted pumpkin and sage butter

4 servings

The fulsome sage butter is soft & simple allowing the pumpkin tortellini to shine through. The addition of the fried sage leaves adds a nice crunch which contrasts with the silkiness of the tortellini.

The inspiration for this post found here.

ingredients:

½ portion pasta dough

for the filling:

1 kg pumpkin

1 Tblsp melted ghee/butter

¼ tsp freshly shaved nutmeg

½ tsp fine rock salt

¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

for the sage butter and toasted leaves:

60g unsalted butter

40 sage leaves – divided

4 Tblsp peanut oil

for garnishing:

pine nut parmesan

few rounds of black pepper

a sprinkling of fine rock salt

preparation:

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.

To make the filling, slice the unpeeled pumpkin in half, scoop out the seeds with a spoon, then slice each half into 5-6 wedges and place in a large bowl. Drizzle over the melted ghee or butter and toss with your hands until the wedges are sufficiently coated. Arrange on a lined baking tray and roast for 30 – 40 minutes until soft. Allow to cool and scoop the pulp away from its skin with a spoon.  Place in a medium bowl and with a hand blender, puree until smooth. Allow to drain through a cloth for an hour. Place the pumpkin back into the bowl and sprinkle over the nutmeg, salt and pepper, stir to combine.

roll out the pasta dough:

Divide the pasta dough into thirds. Work with one piece at a time and keep the other pieces covered. Follow the detailed instructions here. Roll your dough as thin as possible ( I rolled it to #6 on my pasta roller).

shaping the tortellini:

Cut the sheet of pasta into rounds using a 3-inches cutter or tin. Gather the scraps into a ball and put them with the remaining pieces of dough to roll later. Place 1 teaspoon of filling in the middle of each round. (Don’t be tempted to overfill, otherwise, they will break and you will have a hard time sealing them.) Dip your finger in a bowl of water and run it along the edges of the circle. Fold the rounds into a crescent shape, pressing the top together carefully and pressing out any air trapped inside and then working your way along the sides. Bend the bottom two corners round to meet each other and press well to seal. Set aside, spacing them apart slightly, on well-floured board, covered. Repeat with remaining pieces of dough, re-rolling the scraps. (It is important to work on a well-floured surface, to avoid the tortellini sticking to it as you repeat with remaining pieces of dough.) Cover with a cloth, or if you are making them a few hours in advance lightly dusk them with semolina flour.

When ready to cook, bring a large pan of lightly salted water to the boil. While waiting for the water to boil, make the sage butter.

to make the sage butter:

Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add 20 of the sage leaves and season with salt and pepper. Turn off the heat and set aside.

toast the sage leaves:

In a small skillet or pan, heat a 4 Tablespoons of peanut oil over medium-high heat. Fry 6–8 sage leaves at a time until crisp, 2–3 seconds. Transfer with a fork to paper towels.

cooking the tortellini & serving:

Once the water is boiling, gently drop the tortellini into the water and cook 3½ – 4 minutes – they will rise to the top. Gently lift out with a slotted spoon onto individual plates. Drizzle with the sage butter, sprinkle over a few spoons of pine nut parmesan, a few rounds of pepper and decorate with the crispy sage leaves. The tortellini goes well with a plate of sauteed kale or nettles.

pear & ginger cornmeal cake (vegan)

14th January 2018

Just a few months ago we moved all the Jivana Yoga classes from our living room in the main house to the new ‘Sadvidya Space’ located at the very back of the property.  It is a beautiful, wild, and natural space overlooking the fruit orchard and the vegetable garden. To get there it is quite a journey, entering through a unassuming green door, stepping into and away from the hustle and bustle of old Sintra; you then weave your way past the main house, following the signs that lead along a cobbled stoned path through a lush green forest full of moss, all the while listening to the soft and sweet melody of the birds above.

Already something of yourself has softened and a natural quietness begins to present itself from within. You continue to pass an old chapel canopied under richly, scented eucalyptus trees which loom above, and there you find yourself at a door of the ‘Sadvidya Space’ where one can enter into the warmth and escape the attraction of the external world to travel inwards for a few hours.

I like to think of this journey from the ‘Green Door’ to the ‘Space’ as preparation for our inward practice, helping us to begin to let go along the way.  This is also where I like to test my new recipes and serve them after class to our lovely group on Saturday mornings. This pear and ginger cornmeal cake disappeared very quickly.  

´The Sadvidya Space´

pear & ginger cornmeal cake

8  servings

The ginger and pear are perfect together and the ginger is subtle enough that it lingers. A very easy dessert for morning or to prepare for a large group.  I like to bake this in a wider baking tray (6.5-inch x 10.5-inch) almost like a slice if using a smaller tray or skillet the cake may need more cooking time.

pear topping :

4 small/370g small firm pears

2 Tblsp butter/ghee/coconut oil (I used butter)

2 Tblsp brown sugar

dry ingredients :

1 cup/135g cornmeal

½ cup/75g whole wheat flour

½ cup/75g unbleached white flour

2 tsp baking powder

½ tsp fine rock salt

1 heaped tsp ginger powder

wet ingredients :

¼ cup soy milk/almond milk

¼ cup olive oil

¾ cup maple syrup (maple syrup can be replaced with ½ cup sugar, increase almond milk to ½ cup instead of ¼)

2 Tblsp finely chopped crystallized ginger (optional)

garnishing:

2 Tblsp brown sugar

½ cup roughly chopped macadamia nuts

preparation :

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.  Line a baking pan or round 8- to 9- inch cast iron skillet.

for the pear topping: Halve the pears, remove the seeds, and slice each half into fours about ¼-inch thick. Set aside.  In a large skillet add the butter/oil and sugar, place the skillet over a medium heat and melt the mixture, stirring to combine.  Cook until the mixture begins to bubble, about 2 minutes. Add the pears, toss the pan to coat them with syrup, cover and allow to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

for the cake: Whisk together the cornmeal, whole wheat flour, unbleached white flour, baking powder, salt and ginger powder in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.

In a separate mixing bowl, combine the nut milk, olive oil, maple syrup, and if using the finely chopped crystallized ginger.

Combine the wet and dry ingredients.  Mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon; do not over mix. Pour into the baking dish or oiled skillet, you may need to spread the batter out with a spatula.

Toss the pears to coat them with the pan juices and individually lay the pear slices decoratively in even rows over the top of the batter, drizzle with the remaining pan juices. Sprinkle with a little brown sugar and the roughly chopped macadamia nuts.

Bake until golden for approximately 35 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Serve with a dollop of cream or Greek yoghurt.

Goodness shared by Stacey

Andreia´s coconut cookies (vegan)

16th December 2017

These delicious cookies have shreds of crunchy coconut on the outside and a soft, silky, cakey interior. They started from a cookie which Andreia from Soul Food Vegan baked for us when she was preparing lunches for the Jivana Week, I altered them slightly inspired by a coconut cookie recipe in Kim Boyce -`Good to the Grain´.

coconut cookies

Makes 28 – 30 cookies.

I tried these with different whole flours which made a heavier cookie, the all-purpose flour creates a light and silky interior which is preferable.

dry ingredients:

3 cups/220g coarse shredded dried unsweetened coconut – divided

1 cup/120g all-purpose flour

1 cup/135g coconut sugar

⅛ tsp fine rock salt

½ tsp baking powder

wet ingredients:

⅓ cup melted coconut oil

½ cup/125ml almond/rice milk/coconut milk

1 tsp vanilla essence

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

for the finish:

1 cup dried shredded unsweetened coconut

preparation:

Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350F. Line two baking sheets with baking paper. Set aside.

Grind half the dried coconut in a food processor or blender for 30 seconds until it resembles fine flour. Pour into a medium bowl and add the remaining 1½ cups of shredded coconut, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Whisk to combine and set aside.

Over medium heat, melt the coconut oil and measure out a ⅓ cup. Add into a small jug or bowl along with the almond milk, vanilla essence and vinegar. Whisk to combine.

Pour the wet mixture into the dry ingredients and combine well until all incorporated. Refrigerate the dough for 10 minutes before moulding for easier handling and a firmer more mounded dome shape.

Scoop balls of dough about a tablespoon in size (approx 20g) and form into a round ball by rolling in the palms of your hand, as you dip one side into the coconut, flatten slightly. Gently lift out of the coconut and place them on the prepared baking trays, coconut side up, leaving about 2 inches between them.

Bake for 16 – 20 minutes, rotating the tray halfway through until the coconut crust is golden and the bottom of the cookies are evenly brown. Place the second tray into the oven and bake the next round. Allow to cool completely. When freshly baked these cookies have a delicious outside crunch which softens up the longer they sit. Delicious eaten the same day, otherwise, place in an airtight container.

pongal

7th December 2017

This is a dish I make after the Wednesday morning Yoga class when Lior is away as he usually prepares the Ayurveda meal for that day. It is much appreciated and is a wonderfully, soothing warm first meal. Pongal is favourable for all seasons, especially in the cooler months.  I serve it with tamarind gojju, steamed greens and seasonal fruits.

~A wintering garden

pongal

Serves 4 – 6

If wanting to make this a simple, cleansing first meal after a day of fasting omit the cashew nuts. Use only white rice as any other whole rice will change the overall flavour. 

ingredients :

1 cup/180g white basmati 

1 cup/200g moong dal, split

10 cups water

2¼ flat tsp fine rock salt

1 cup/85g dried shredded coconut

¼ cup finely chopped coriander

voggarane :

½ cup melted ghee

1 heaped tsp whole black peppercorns

10 pieces raw cashews nuts

1½ tsp heaped cumin seeds

¼ heaped tsp turmeric powder

¼ flat tsp asafoetida powder

20 fresh curry leaves

preparation:

In a heavy saucepan, wash dal several times until water runs clear – then drain.

Pour the water into a saucepan and bring to boil on a high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.)  You may need to skim off any foam which accumulates at the top at the beginning of boiling. Simmer for approximately 20 minutes. May need to add more water, depending on the preferred consistency of your Pongal.

While waiting for the rice and dal to cook, roughly grind peppercorns in a mortar and pestle and break the cashew nuts in half and half again. Measure remaining spices for the voggarane and chop the fresh coriander.  Set aside.

When the rice and dal have softened sufficiently, turn off heat and stir in salt, dried coconut and fresh coriander. Prepare the voggarane.

Voggarane :

Heat a small pan/bandalei over medium-heat, then add the ghee and roughly ground peppercorns and cashew pieces. Stir once, then allow the ghee to heat and the peppercorns to fry and cashews to turn golden – approximately 2 minutes.  Turn off the heat and quickly add cumin seeds, asafoetida, turmeric and curry leaves – in this order. Allow to fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around, allowing spices to fry evenly.

Pour the voggarane into the rice and dal mixture, mixing well.  You may need to swish the pan out with a little hot water to get all the remaining spices. Allow to sit for 5 minutes for the flavours to be absorbed before serving. Enjoy as is with a spoon of ghee or my prefered way of serving Pongal is with a tamarind gojju and lightly steamed greens. 

Goodness shared by Stacey

vegan challah (revisited)

5th October 2017

challah - 1 (5)

I  always look forward to sharing this bread when the four of us are all together.  And, especially if we are lucky enough to have our family or friends join us on these Friday nights. This is where we savour the opportunity to pause, bless and reflect on the week just passed and to light the candles as a reminder of that inner light inside all of us.

What is left-over, we spend the weekend eating with all sorts of delicious spreads.

india - sugarcane juice - 1 (3) india - sugarcane juice - 1 india - sugarcane juice - 1 (1) india - sugarcane juice - 1 (2)
Freshly pressed sugar cane juice – Mysore, South India.

challah - 1 (3)

vegan challah

Makes one large, challah.

The recipe uses a mixer with a hook dough, but you can easily use your hands. 

ingredients :

2 Tbsp flaxseed, plus 6 Tblsp water, whisked together

1 cup warm milk/almond milk

60 grams butter – room temperature/6 Tblsp olive oil

1 tsp active dry yeast

150g wholewheat flour

350g regular all-purpose flour

40g brown sugar/coconut sugar

1½ tsp fine rock salt

preparation :

In a bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment.  Whisk together the flax seeds with 6 tablespoons water.  Allow to sit for 10 minutes.  Add the warm milk/water, soft butter and sprinkle in the yeast, leave undisturbed until the mixture is foaming, about 5 – 6 minutes.

Measure out the flours, sugar and salt, whisk together and sprinkle over the yeast & milk mixture, turn the machine on the lowest option and knead on medium speed for about 5 minutes or 10 minutes by hand.  The dough should be elastic and smooth.  If the dough seems too sticky, add more flour, a tablespoon at a time or if seemly too dry, add more liquid, a tablespoon at a time.

Cover with a damp tea towel and allow the dough to sit in a warm place for 1 – 1½ hours until well risen and doubled its size.  The longer it sits the better the final bread. I usually start in the early morning and it sits for 4 – 5 hours before proceeding to the second rise.

Take out the dough, knead a little with the heel of your hands and work it into a ball.

plaiting the dough :

Divide the dough into three equal pieces with a sharp knife or bench scraper.  Using your palms, and starting from the centre and working outward, elongate 1 piece by rolling it gently against the work surface with even pressure until you have formed a rope the desired length.  Repeat with the remaining 2 pieces. Place the three side by side.  Now pinch together the top ends and carefully braid the three, like you would if you were braiding or plaiting hair.  As I braid, I gently pull them length-wise to keep them as even as possible. Pinch together the ends and tuck them slightly under.

Transfer the plaited loaf to the baking tray and brush with ghee/oil and sprinkle with poppy & sesame seeds.

Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a damp tea towel and set in a warm place to rise for 1½ hours.

About 10 minutes before the dough has finished rising, preheat an oven to 200C/400F with a rack in the lower third of the oven.  Remove the plastic wrap or towel and bake for 25 – 30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Allow to cool completely before cutting into it.

When it is just the four of us, we have been enjoying the challah with a simple vegetable soup, a salad and a bowl of guacamole, and for dessert, slathered with homemade jam.

challah - 1 (6)

Goodness shared by Stacey

pasta dough without eggs

29th August 2017

homemade vegan pasta 4 - 1

Once you get the feel of the dough, making pasta without eggs is easy, it is a little softer, more delicate, however, the texture is divine. Homemade pasta is much lighter on the system and easier to digest.

The durum wheat flour helps absorb the flavours. It makes a softer, silky, smooth dough, that you will not get from other flours it also absorbs more water then ordinary flour, so keep that in mind if swapping the flours around.

This is a recipe that has developed over trial and error, as time goes on I am sure it will evolve even more and I will update accordingly. So far, I found when rolling and thinning the dough I used a liberal amount of flour – this may have something to do with where we live as there is a lot of moisture in the air in Sintra. I found using an icing sugar shaker very handy for this purpose, a sifter or sieve will work just as well to get a fine layer of dusting. The process is quite time-consuming, however the more confident you become with the process the quicker it is. The results are so delicious and worth the effort and impossible to go back to a box of dried pasta.  Making your pasta from scratch is a very satisfying process.

homemade vegan pasta 3 - 1vegan pasta dough - 1 (11)vegan pasta sheets & noodles - 1

pasta dough without eggs

Serves 6 

Recipe inspired by Kusama via Elegantly Vegan.

If attempting for the first time halve the dough recipe.  It comfortably serves 3 – 4.  The best way to get good at making fresh pasta is to make it again and again. 

ingredients:

480g/4¼ cups finely ground semolina flour from durum wheat

2 tsp fine rock salt

4 Tblsp olive oil

300 – 360 ml warm water

extra flour for dusting

special equipment :

pasta making machine

preparing the pasta dough:

In a medium bowl, measure out the flour, sprinkle in the salt and whisk to combine. Create a well in the centre of the flour, drizzle in the olive oil and slowly pour in 300ml (about 1¼ cup warm water). Using your hands, combine the dry into the wet, adding water a tablespoon at a time until the dough comes together into a ball. Dust your work surface with flour and knead the dough, begin gently folding the dough on itself, flattening, and folding again, for about ten minutes.

When you finish kneading, cover tightly with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for at least half an hour to an hour. For best results knead and allow the dough to rest for as long as possible.

rolling out the pasta dough:

Unwrap the dough and divide it into quarters, and then each quarter in half again so you have eight equal portions, weighing approximately 90 – 100 grams. Work with one portion at a time, and cover the rest. Flour your work surface and flatten one piece of dough a little less than the width of the pasta maker. Feed it through the thickest setting on the machine – #0.  Lightly dust both sides of the sheet of pasta with flour and fold this piece of dough into thirds, like folding a letter, dust again and feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers.  Repeat this step 5 – 6 times. This helps strengthen the gluten in the flour, giving it a chewier texture when cooked. Change settings to the slightly thinner setting – #1, dust with flour and feed it through the machine without folding it; then set it on #2 and so forth until achieving the desired thickness – I finished at #5.

vegan pasta noodles - 1 (3)

If your pasta sticks at all, dust both sides with more flour or is too lengthy to manage, lay on a cutting board and cut in half.  Don’t tug or pull on the pasta as it goes through the machine. Let the rollers do the work. With practice, you will become familiar with your machine and with the dough and will be able to manoeuvre the dough by slightly moving it left or right so that it doesn’t go in crooked.

Now cut the sheet of pasta crosswise into pieces about 25 cm long and lightly dust them with flour again. I like to air dry the sheets for 15 – 20 minutes before cutting.

To make the process easier, roll out all the dough at once before cutting it into the desired shape. Dust the sheets of pasta generously with flour and overlap them on a floured board or hang them over racks. When ready to cut use the sheets which were rolled out first and have been sitting longer to dry.

cutting the pasta :

If making filled pasta or lasagna, proceed with shaping.  If cutting into noodles, switch from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter, dust again with flour and run the sheet of pasta through the cutter. As soon as the pasta comes through the cutter, dust generously with flour and gently fold into loose rounds to make a nest. Dust again with a little flour and continue with the remaining dough. Leave the pasta to air dry for 15 minutes – 3 hours before using. This helps the pasta to not clump together while cooking.

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Once cut and sitting in mounds, cover loosely with a cloth and every hour gently pick up the mounds to loosen the noodles, gently replacing them into their mounds again.

to cook the pasta :

To cook the pasta immediately, bring a pot of well-salted water to a rollicking boil. Add the pasta to the water and cook for about 1 – 2 minutes – don’t overcook!  The pasta should float to the top of the pot when it’s ready and be al dente. Be gentle with it when you lift it from the water. Drain and then just drizzle it in olive oil or toss it with your favourite pasta sauce, and it’s ready to serve.

To dry, allow to air dry until completely brittle, turning the nests from time to time. Depending on the humidity it should take 5 – 6 hours.

To freeze, gather the bundles in a single layer separated with baking paper and freeze, in an airtight container, up to three months. Do not thaw them – place them directly in boiling water – may take 2 – 3 minutes to cook.

Enjoy!

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