indian recipes

everyday simple dal for Yasmin

6th March 2017

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A simple dal we make weekly, served with chapati and along side a cabbage or okra palya.  A recipe my daughter requested that I write-up so that she can refer to when she moves out later this year.  It is also one of her favourite meal combinations.  We are in the process of learning how to make 6 easy meals which she can prepare herself.  This dal being one of them.

If the thought of making chapati sounds a bit over whelming – it can be served with a bowl of rice and a crispy salad.  When drizzled with ghee it becomes a deeply soothing, warming, nourishing meal.

The tomatoes can be replaced with any vegetable of choice,  I like the process of stewing them in a voggarane pan before adding them into the cooked dāl, this way they slightly caramalise, deepening the flavour with the spices.

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~ Evening forage at the end of the day in a blanket of mist.  Silent.

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everyday simple dal

Serves 3 – 4

Inspired by Tara O’brady – Everyday Yellow Dal.

In Ayurveda, it is important to understand the different types of dal/legumes used and their energetic qualities.  There are two dals which are favourable and used most often – whole mung beans (whole moong beans) and split moong dal (yellow split lentils) which are whole moong beans skinned and split.  These two are easy to digest, gentle on the system and cause minimum disturbances to your constitution.  All other dal/legumes are recommended to use in moderation and in small quantities.

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ingredients :

1 cup/220g yellow split moong dal (yellow split lentils)

3 cups/750ml water

for the voggarane :

2 Tblsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

8 fresh curry leaves

1 dried chilli – torn in half

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp finely chopped ginger

1 medium tomato, chopped into small pieces

½ – 1 tsp fine rock salt

a small handful coriander leaves

juice from half a lemon

preparation :

In a heavy saucepan, wash dal several times until water runs clear – then drain.

Pour the 3 cups water into saucepan and bring to boil on a medium-high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.)  You may need to skim of any foam which accumulates at the top at the beginning of boiling.  Simmer until dāl is soft, creamy and broken down – approximately 30 minutes.  You may need to add a little water if the dal becomes too dry.  I like to have the consistency quite thick when serving with chapatis and more liquid when serving with rice.

While waiting for the dal to soften, prepare the voggarane.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee, once hot add mustard seeds; as the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the cumin seed, curry leaves, fry for a few seconds, then add asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around allowing spices to fry evenly.  To the voggarane add the chopped tomatoes and ginger, cover and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, fry until the tomato starts to break up.

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Stir this into the dal, add salt, lemon juice and garnish with fresh coriander.  Serve with fresh chapati, a cabbage or okra palya.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

barley kichadi

22nd February 2017

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Barley is cooling, sweet, and mildly astringent.  Ideal for decreasing Pitta and Kapha.  It can improve a sluggish digestion and has a slightly drying effect, helping to clear fluids from the body. Barley is considered one of the “good” carbohydrates.

If the water in which barley is boiled, is given to a person suffering from diarrhea it gives him instant relief.

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~ evening reflections.

~ Pleopeltis polypodioides, also known as the resurrection fern. The resurrection fern gets its name because it can survive long periods of drought by curling up its fronds, appearing grey-brown and dead. However, when just a little water is present, the fern will uncurl and reopen, appearing to “resurrect” and restoring itself to a vivid green colour within about 24 hours.

~’Chasmanthe floribunda, African cornflag.

~ the outer edges of the wall at the end of the day.

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barley kichadi

Serves 3 – 4

I have been making this weekly, quick and easy with a scoop of thick yogurt and a drizzling of ghee, it is a wonderfully warming, soothing and cleansing meal.  When simmering the moong dal try to catch them while they still hold their shape and before they turn to mush.  I use an organic pearl barley in this recipe, if using unhusked barley it will need an overnight soaking and longer cooking time – recommended to boil separately ½ hour before adding the moong dal .

Our favourite barley recipe is this lovely soothing lemon barley water.

ingredients :

½ cup/100g  pearl barley

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (mung beans)

2 litre /8 cups water

1 cup/90g chopped celery/fennel

1 cup/50g chopped cabbage

1 heaped teaspoon rock salt 

1½ heaped tsp jaggery/brown sugar

¼ cup/20g dried shredded coconut

1 Tblsp finely chopped ginger

½ cup/60g frozen green peas

voggarane :

1 Tbsp  ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

⅛ heaped tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

1 medium red chilli, roughly chopped

10-15 fresh curry leaves

⅛ heaped tsp turmeric powder

juice of half a lemon or more to taste

½ cup chopped fresh coriander 

handful small kale/spinach leaves

preparation :

Place the whole moong dal & barley, in a heavy saucepan and cover with water.  Swish around with your hand, drain, repeat and rinse.  Do this several times until the water runs clear.  Pour the 8 cups water into the pot and bring to boil over a high heat, then lower the heat to maintain a rapid simmer.  Simmer until barley has soften and the dal is cooked but still holding their shape – approximately 30 – 40 minutes. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.) Half way through cooking add the chopped celery & cabbage.

While waiting for the barley & dal to cook, chop the chilli into three pieces and tear the curry leaves in half (this way everyone is guaranteed to consume a curry leaf and benefit from their medicinal properties).

When the barley & moong dal has softened, add salt, sugar/jaggery, dried coconut and the chopped ginger.  Simmer for 5 minutes more, then turn off the heat, add the peas, (if using fresh peas add 5 mins after adding other vegetables) cover and set aside.

prepare the voggarane:

In a small pan over medium heat, add ghee and mustard seeds.   When the seeds start to splutter and pop, turn down the heat and add the cumin seeds, asafoetida powder (hingu), and the chopped red chilli.  Fry until sizzling and fragrant.  Add the curry leaves and turmeric powder and fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly.

Turn off the heat, add the voggarane to the kichadi.   Squeeze in the lemon juice and with your hands, break up the fresh coriander and kale, stir into the kichadi.  Check for seasoning, adding more salt or lemon if needed.  When ready, drizzle with ghee, garnish with fresh coriander and serve with a spoon of yogurt.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

kaseri bath – sweet upma

12th February 2017

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Satyam, sivam and sundaram.

Truth, sacredness, and beauty are three most important characteristics seen through the universe. They come from the Eternal Truth and are contained in everything to a greater or lesser extent. Happiness takes shelter under their protection.  Violence can utterly spoil them.  When we intentionally violate these qualities we violate Truth. It is therefore our duty to preserve and maintain them.

~ The sacred Tradition of Yoga – Dr Shankaranarayana Jois

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A recipe shared by our teacher last year as part of  The Jivana Yoga Diploma, we are fortunate to be graced with their presence here in Portugal.  Their presence in our home and lives leaves a profound effect on our daily existence and our practices become that little bit more concrete and established on this yogic path.

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Kaseri Bath – Sweet Upma

Serves 8 – 10 small servings

Kaseri Bath is especially recommended for Yoga practitioners.  It calms the mind and keeps it fresh.  It may be used by all constitutions.  Kaseri Bath can be served as part of a main meal and it is especially recommended to be served with Upma or Idli.  Best served warm, it is the Indian tradition to start with the sweet first.  Depending on the type of sugar used, the taste and colour may vary. Instead of bananas, apple or pineapple can be used.

ingredients :

1½ cups/350ml warm water

1 pinch saffron – approximately 15 threads

6 cardamom pods  – ¼ tsp ground

3 medium-sized bananas – approximately 200g chopped

10 pieces raw cashew nuts

10 pieces raw almonds

1 cup/165g semolina

½ cup/125ml ghee – liquid

¼ cup/35g raisins/sultanas

¼ tsp fine rock salt

1 cup/205g light brown sugar 

preparation :

Measure out the 1½ cups water and place the saffron threads to steep for 15 minutes, while preparing the rest of the ingredients.

Peel & cut the bananas into 1 cm pieces.  Cut the almonds into 3 pieces and the cashew nuts into 2 pieces.

Remove the hard shell from the cardamom, and place the small black seeds in a mortar and pestle, grind into a fine powder.  Set aside.

Over a medium heat, pour the ghee into a medium-sized skillet/bandalei, add almonds, cashews and semolina.  Stir continuously for approximately 10 minutes, or until the cashews have turned golden-brown in colour.

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Pour in the saffron water, add the raisins, chopped banana and salt. Stir continuously for approximately 3 minutes.  Add the sugar, after about 30 seconds of stirring the Kesari Bath will become considerably more softer and liquid in consistency, and then will thicken slightly again. 

This process will take approximately  2-3 minutes, of continually stirring; or until the sugar has dissolved.  While stirring, once you feel the Kesari Bath is thicker in consistency and starts to slide away from the pan – it is ready.  Turn off the heat, stir in the cardamon powder, mixing well. 

Allow the Kesari Bath to rest for a minute and for the flavours to deepen.  Serve warm.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

a traditional Ayurvedic herbal drink – Kashaya

3rd December 2016

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Kashaya is a deeply nourishing and soothing drink that brings calmness to the mind and supports the general health and balance of the system. Kashaya is appropriate for all constitutions and in all seasons.  It is recommended to consume at the end of a meal and to have once – twice a day.  Kashaya balances Vata, Pitta and Kapha, helps maintain the digestive fire and reduces heat in the body.

There are many variations of Kashaya – Below are two very simple and easy to prepare recipes for everyday use. They require only two of the main spices – cumin and coriander.  The first is a Kashaya powder which involves lightly roasting and grinding the seeds and the second, a simple infusion using the whole seeds.

Considering your constitution, it is good to keep in mind that jaggery is more heating for the body than brown sugar.

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coriander seed:

Coriander is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, pungent and sweet in taste.  It evokes the digestive fire while simultaneously cooling and soothing. It tonifies, increases absorption, improves digestive enzymes, reduces nausea and blood pressure.  Coriander seed removes excess heat in the body, making it useful in cooling Pitta-related imbalances associated with menopause.  It also supports proper function of the kidneys and healthy urination. The seeds combine well with Cumin to make an excellent digestive tea.

cumin seed:

Cumin is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, Pungent and Astringent.  It is carminative, aromatic, and on the whole, cool in action.   A common household spice, its Sanskrit name literally means ‘promoting digestion’.  In addition to providing flavour to food, cumin evokes the digestive fire, promotes healthy absorption and eliminates natural toxins.  It is useful to the eyes, beneficial to the heart and strengthens the uterus.  It enhances immunity and invokes good sleep.

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Coriander-Cumin Kashaya Powder

This recipe was shared by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Sadvidya Yoga Diploma.  It came about as an aid to reduce Pitta disturbances in the body and to assist with interrupted sleep due to menopause.  It is deeply nourishing and satisfying drink to have after a meal and satisfies that sweet craving, as well as benefiting from its wonderful medicinal qualities.  The key to opening up the real flavour is making sure that you get the kashaya to a rolicking boil just before straining – the heat changes everything.

Makes approximately 18 – 20 cups Kashaya

ingredients for kashaya powder :

⅓ cup/35g whole cumin seed

½ cup/35g whole coriander seed

preparation :

On a medium flame, heat a skillet until it is hot to touch. Dry-roast the cumin seeds until their colour deepens and a noticeable smell appears – approximately 1 minute. Seeds may start popping by that point.  Be careful not to burn the spices as they can ruin the taste of the kashaya.  Set aside to cool.  Place the coriander seeds into the skillet and repeat the process – the coriander seeds will take 1½  minutes to roast.

In a powerful blender/coffee grinder, grind the toasted cumin seeds to a fine powder. Pour into a bowl and set aside.  Repeat with the toasted coriander seeds – these may take slightly longer to grind.  Pour into the bowl with the ground cumin and combine well.  Store in an airtight container.  

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To preserve the medicinal qualities of the spices, it is recommended to make fresh every 10 – 14 days.

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to prepare the kashaya :

¾ cup water

1 heaped tsp Kashaya Powder

1 heaped tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 – 2 tsp/5 – 10mL milk (less milk is easier on the digestion, especially in the evening)

preparation:

In a small pan, pour in ¾ cup water and bring to boiling point.  Add the Kashaya powder and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk, stir and pour into a cup (no need to strain as drinking the layer of powder which collects at the bottom is beneficial for the medicinal properties). Set aside to cool until moderately warm.  Enjoy.

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Whole Coriander-Cumin Seed Kashaya

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1 serving

Don´t throw away those left over seeds after straining, place them in a pot outside your kitchen or in the garden – in no time you will have fresh greens to harvest for your cooking.

ingredients :

½ tsp whole coriander seeds

½ tsp whole cumin seeds

1 cup water

1 tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 tsp/5mL milk (optional)

preparation :

In a small pan, pour in 1 cup of water and bring to boiling point.  Add the whole coriander and cumin seeds and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk (if using), and strain the Kashaya.  Set aside to cool until moderately warm.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

lemon rice

15th October 2016

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A delicious recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma. Lemon rice is a simple and tasty dish, it is easily digested and suitable for all constitutions. It can be used daily and throughout all seasons.  Serve with a simple vegetable palya, green salad or with a cucumber raytha.

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Beautiful India

Mallige – Jasmine flower, Mysore 

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Lemon Rice (Chitraanna)

Serves 3 – 4

Split bengal gram & urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store, when briefly fried in the oil they add a lovely crunch to the dish.  The fresh curry leaves when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months – they have wonderful medicinal qualities. 

Use heaped when measurements except stated otherwise.

ingredients :

1 cup white rice

3 cups water

¼ cup peanut/melted coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

2 tsp split bengal gram (channa dal)

1 tsp split urad dal (black gram)

1 medium, mild dried red chilli

10 raw cashew nuts

1 tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

1 medium carrot (1 cup grated)

2 tsp grated ginger

½ cup dried unsweetened shredded coconut

1 tsp rock salt

1 tsp sugar / jaggery

1 -2 Tblsp lemon juice

¼ cup chopped coriander leaves

to prepare the rice:

In a heavy based saucepan, wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs off clear then drain. Pour in the water and bring to boil over a medium – high heat,  then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer .  Do not cover the pot with a lid, as this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until water has almost completely evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

While waiting for the rice to cool, halve the cashews, grate the ginger and cut the chilli into 3-4 pieces. Using a box grater, grate the carrot – measuring 1 cup. Rinse and chop the fresh coriander. Set aside.

to prepare the lemon rice:

In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds; When the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the bengal gram, urad dal, and fry for a few seconds, Then add the chilli, cashews, and cumin seeds. Fry until bengal gram is golden in colour (depending on the skillet / pot you are using, you may need to lower the heat while frying). Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder, and to continue to fry for a few seconds.  

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Stir in the grated carrot, ginger, coconut, salt, jaggery and lemon juice, cook for approximately 6 minutes, until all ingredients have combined and the carrot is soft. Turn off the heat.

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Add the cooked rice (make sure it has cooled first) and combine the rice with the grated carrot & spices. Stir in the fresh coriander. Using the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices.
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Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery or lemon.  Serve immediately.  Lemon rice can be served with raytha, plain yogurt or accompanied with a vegetable palya.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

green bean palya

11th September 2016

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This is a great dish to make in late August when you have a glut of beans that cannot be picked fast enough and are becoming quite tough and in need of that extra boiling time to soften and bring out the flavour.  The climbing bean would have to be one of my favourite vegetables growing in the garden.  Once they are at their peak they continue to produce at a fast and furious rate.  Here, in Europe I grow the runner beans which have proven to do the best, being most resilient and tough, in this odd unpredictable, misty, Sintra climate.  They also produce the most beautiful flowers of ivory and cream.

Before leaving for our Summer holiday I planted a second round of climbing beans, planting in hope to extend the season, but alas only two came up, fortunately I also threw in a bed of very old french beans to clean out my seed box.  To my surprise all sprouted with robust enthusiasm and are close to picking in two weeks, I just hope the weather stays warm as we edge our way into early Autumn.  This is the warmest and dryist of Summers we have had since arriving in Portugal and the garden is rejoicing in it.

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This dish may be used as a condiment or independently served with rice, chapati or poori.  It strengthens the body, is easily digested and is suitable for all constitutions.   Suitable to be used daily and throughout all seasons.  For a variation of taste, lemon juice can be added at the end of preparation.  This variation is recommended when eating with rice.

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Green Bean Palya

The chilli, commonly used in South Indian cooking, is Byaadagi chilli and is known for its deep red colour; it is relatively sweet and less spicy.  If unsure about the level of spice of the chilli you are using, leave whole or cut in half.

The Byaadagi chilli, split bengal gram & urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store.

Serves 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma.  

ingredients :

4 cups /420g green beans

4 Tblsp peanut/melted coconut oil

1 tsp black mustard seeds

1 Tblsp split bengal gram (chickpea)

1 tsp split urad dāl (black gram)

1 tsp cumin seeds

2 medium, mild dried red chilies,chopped

tsp hingu powder (asafoetida)

½ tsp turmeric powder

20-25 fresh curry leaves

1½ cups/375ml  water

5 Tblsp dried shredded coconut

1 tsp rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

½ cup chopped coriander leaves

Preparation:

Wash, top-tail and chop the green beans into small pieces.  Set aside.

In a heavy bottom skillet, over a medium flame, heat the oil and add the mustard seeds; wait until they start to splatter and pop and then add the bengal gram, urad dāl, cumin seeds, chillies, and hingu. 

Fry until bengal gram and urad dāl have turned golden in colour then add the turmeric powder and curry leaves.

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Add to the skillet the chopped beans, water, salt and jaggery. 

Stir to combine.  Simmer rapidly on medium heat until the beans have softened – approximately 15 minutes.  If wanting more of a firm bean, simmer for less time.

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Turn off the heat and stir in the dried coconut and fresh coriander leaves. 

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Allow to sit for 5 minutes in order to cool slightly and for the flavours to be absorbed.  Taste, adding more salt or jaggery, as needed.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

coriander leaf vānghī bāth

25th August 2016

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We made this dish in the last ‘Introduction to Meditation & Ayurvedic Cooking’ workshop we held in June.  It is a recipe given to us by Gillian, taught to her by our teacher’s wife – the original recipe uses fresh fenugreek leaves which are hard to come by here in Portugal, so the fresh coriander makes a lovely alternative.

The Ayurvedic cooking session is taught in the last part of the workshop, so we all get to share in a blessing together and enjoy the meal we have just prepared.  This Coriander Leaf Vanghi Bath with Indian spices and heaps of coriander leaves is superb, and goes perfectly accompanied by a salad of grated carrot; a big bowl of sliced cucumber and various leaves and flowers picked fresh from the garden. Each workshop is very special and as we partake and teach more and more of them, we become open, confident and efficient in the running of them.  Both days were deliciously warm, sunny and still, so we were able to open up the doors and sit outside during the breaks to enjoy the beautiful presence of nature and the warmth of the sun.

Our next workshop is planned for November and is open to register here.

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coriander leaf vānghī bāth

Use heaped spoon measurements, except when stated otherwise.

Serves 4

ingredients:

1 cup rice

3 cups water

¼ cup ghee/coconut oil

½ tsp mustard seeds

¼ tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

10 fresh curry leaves

3 bunches/3 cups fresh coriander leaf/fenugreek leaves

½ cup dried shredded coconut

1 tsp rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

½-1 tsp tamarind paste

1½-2 tsp sambar powder

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Preparation:

In a heavy-based saucepan, wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs off clear, then drain.

Pour in the water and bring to boil over a medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to maintain a rapid simmer. Do not cover the pot with a lid, as this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until water has almost completely evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

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While waiting for the rice to cool, wash the coriander leaves, dry and chop (can use stems).  You should have 3 full cups chopped coriander.  Set aside.

In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds. When the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the asafoetida powder, turmeric powder and curry leaves. Fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow the spices to fry evenly.

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Add the fresh coriander leaves, dried coconut, salt, jaggery, tamarind paste and sambar powder, and stir for one minute, then turn off the heat. 

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Add the cooked rice (make sure it has cooled first), and combine the rice using a wooden spoon or the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices.

Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery.  Garnish with handful of extra fresh coriander leaves and serve with a spoon of ghee.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

pepper rasam

26th July 2016

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Pepper Rasam is a simple and tasty liquid dish, considered tridhatus samya, balances all three doshas, Vata, Pitta, and Kapha.  It provokes the appetite and is helpful for indigestion. It helps to reduce nausea and is beneficial for those with high fever.  It may be consumed two or three times in a week.  It is recommended to be served with rice, a spoon of ghee and goes very well with steamed greens or a green bean palya.

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~ Evening, Praia Do Guincho

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Pepper Rasam

Serves 3 – 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma.  For those with Vata imbalance, it is recommended to reduce the toor dal to cup.

Use heaped measurements except when stated otherwise.

ingredients:

⅓ – ½ cup toor dal

1 litre/4 cups water

1 tsp fine rock salt

4 tsp jaggery

¼ cup chopped coriander leaves

first voggarane:

2 tsp ghee 

½ tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp urad dal

½ – 1 tsp whole black peppercorns, depending on your preferred spice

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves 

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup shredded dried coconut

250ml/1 cup warm water

second voggarane :

1 tsp  ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves

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preparation:

In a heavy saucepan, wash toor dal several times until water runs clear – then drain.  Pour water into saucepan and bring to boil on a medium-high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.) Simmer until dal is soft and broken down – approximately 30 – 40 minutes, 2 – 3 cups of liquid remaining.

first voggarane:

In a small pan/bandalei over medium heat, add 2 tsp ghee, once hot add mustard seeds; as the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add urad dal, whole peppercorns, and 1 tsp cumin seed. Once urad dal is golden brown, add 6 curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around allowing spices to fry evenly. Pour into the voggarane, dried coconut and 1 cup warm water, stir to combine then pour into blender. Blend until smooth, approximately 1 minute.

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Add mixture to dal, use liquid from dal to swish blender clean, add back into the dal.  Add salt and jaggery – mix well and set aside.

second voggarane:

Tear remaining 6 curry leaves in half (this way everyone gets a curry leaf, receiving their benefits), set aside.

In the first voggarane pan/bandalei, over medium heat, add remaining ghee, once hot add 1 tsp cumin seeds and torn curry leaves. Fry until the seeds are golden-brown (careful not to burn the cumin.) Pour voggarane into dal, and stir in chopped coriander leaves.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes before tasting, adding more jaggery or salt as needed.  Serve with rice, green bean palya or sauteed greens and drizzle with a spoon of ghee.

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 Goodness shared by Stacey

chapati

12th July 2016

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Chapati has become a regular event in our house.  They are wonderful drizzled with ghee, and served with  a simple dal, or vegetable palya.  I also love them alongside a bowl of guacamole or roasted red pepper spread.

There are different varieties of chapatis available; one made with no fat, one made with oil and one made with ghee. Chapati made with ghee will support the physical and mental health to the fullest extent. It is recommended to be consumed while warm, as it becomes harder when cool. A chapati made with oil is also tasty and healthy and keeps its softness when it has cooled. Chapati can be consumed at any meal time, in all seasons and supports all constitutions.

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early morning vegetable garden

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chapati

Makes 5 chapatis

Recipe shared by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya.

Chapati is traditionally made with Atta, a granular flour milled from soft Indian wheat that yields very tender chapatis.  If you are able to purchase this type of flour, it is recommended.  Here we use a combination of cup wholewheat and cup white flour, resulting in a softer, less tough chapati.  Regular wholewheat flour (sifted to remove the larger bran particles) can also be used.  It may take a few attempts before finding the flours which suit best in your country of residence.  

Making chapati is great in getting the whole family involved in the kitchen. Each person rolling out chapati, makes it a fun and easy process.

ingredients :

1 cup/130g flour (I use ⅔ cup white & cup wholewheat)

¼ tsp salt

2 Tblsp/30ml melted ghee

¼ cup/60mL hot water (or enough for a kneadable dough)

preparation :

Into a large bowl, place the flour and salt.  Whisk to combine.  Pour in the ghee and hot water and stir with a spoon, slowly bringing the dry ingredients into the wet, until mostly combined.

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Using your hands, start kneading into the bowl, adding more water if needed (a teaspoon at a time), to make a tender dough. 

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Work the dough until smooth, shining and does not stick to the hands.  Approximately 5 minutes.  Set aside, covered for 10 minutes. 

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Divide the dough into 5 equal portions and shape each into a ball. 

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Take one ball, using your palms, flatten slightly into a disc. Dip both sides with flour, (most of the time I find I can skip this step and there is no need to dip in flour) then use a rolling-pin to roll it into a very thin, round 7-inch circle.  As you do this, roll the chapati a couple of times and turn slightly: repeat the turnings as you roll to prevent the chapati sticking to the board.  Makes sure each chapati is symmetrical so it puffs up well.  Lately I roll out the dough, fold in half and fold in half again – then roll out again, into a 7-inch circle.  This encourages them to magically puff up when cooking.

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Cover with a damp clean towel/individual sheets of baking paper, and repeat with the remaining balls.   I like to roll out the dough a few hours before I am ready to cook them,  I fold a sheet of baking paper in half, then half again, and place two – three thinly, rolled chapati into the folded quarters of each sheet, until ready to cook.

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Preheat a cast iron/non-stick skillet or tava over medium heat.  Once hot (it is important that it is hot), place the first chapati in the skillet and cook until bubbles start to appear on the surface, about a minute. 

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Flip and cook until tiny brown spots appear on the side facing the pan, about 30 seconds. 

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It should start puffing like a balloon, which could be helped by pressing gently on the forming bubble with a cloth and thus expanding it over the entire surface of the chapati.  Flip twice more for 30 seconds on each side.  There will be 4 – 5 flips throughout the whole process. 

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Be careful not to over cook, otherwise they will be dry and crunchy.  Stack and cover the chapatis as you continue to cook the remaining ones.  Serve immediately.

When made on a regular basis, becoming familiar with the process – chapatis become quick, easy and enjoyable to make.  Serve with a simple dal or Green Bean Palya. 

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Goodness shared by Stacey

carrot raytha & an offering

21st June 2016

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There is a spot on this property where three mighty cedar trees root together in a triangle creating a vaulted, protected, central glade below. This space draws you in, inviting a connection, a pause to listen, and quieten our minds and become present in that moment of beauty. One of the trees has a girth of almost two meters and is so tall it makes a visible home landmark from as far as the Moorish Castle lookout. The thick branches welcome you in, reaching out and upwards for the sky. They stand strong against the fierce gales that hurl off the Atlantic in the summer months. On windy nights, they moan, shake and call to us in our cosy beds.

When we first moved here we held fires under those trees, later it became a place to rest, a place to contemplate and gaze up into the branches; still later, a circle of flowers was planted, and one year we hung a swing from one arm, spending hours daydreaming, spinning, soaking up the feeling of being held by them. Now, it has become a place of offering: Abi and her boys created a mandala, a gesture of their gratitude – created from things collected, from the walks we did that week, from the land and sea, and the joyous celebration and wondrous family feeling of coming together in our home. If you create something in nature – a careful image, an honouring of beauty, an act of appreciation – it can help you tap into the inner light and deepen your connection to it.

It also has caught my attention each time I pass by it now, I pass much more slowly. I slow down and bow my head a little; it offers me perspective, a feeling of being filled with light and allowing that light to flow through and out into this world.

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Thank -you Abi, Issac, Aaron & Seth.

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carrot raytha

Use heaped spoon measurements unless otherwise stated.

Serves 2 person

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma. 

Raytha is a very soothing dish, with the overall property of being cooling for the body.  It is recommended to serve with 1 – 2 cups of cooked rice, and becomes a very cleansing & satisfying meal to have in the evening.  In Ayurveda it is said to evoke a good night sleep.

For a variation on taste ¼tsp lemon juice can be added and can be made with grated cucumber instead of carrot.  This raytha can be used as a dressing over a salad, or roasted vegetables or accompanied with a spicy rice/grain dish or dal.   Fresh curry leaves can be found at your local Indian Store and when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months. After fried briefly in oil they become a uniquely flavourful, and a crunchy surprise, as well as benefiting from their wonderful medicinal qualities.

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ingredients:

1 cup regular yogurt

1 cup filtered water

½ cup finely grated carrot

½ tsp finely grated ginger

¼ tsp rock salt

voggarane:

2 tsp melted coconut / peanut oil

¼ tsp black mustard seeds

¼ tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

2 pinches turmeric powder

preparation:

In a medium bowl, whisk the yogurt, add the water and whisk again until well combined. Grate the carrot and ginger using the finer side on a box grater / parmesan grater. Stir into the yogurt, and add the salt. Set aside.

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prepare the voggarane:

Tear each curry leaf into four pieces. Set aside.

In a small pan over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds. When the seeds start to splutter and pop (It is important to fry the mustard seeds well otherwise they will taste too astringent), add the cumin seeds, curry leaves and turmeric powder and fry for 30 seconds, swishing the pan around to allow for the spices to fry evenly. Turn off the heat, add ¼ cup yogurt mixture into the voggarane, swishing the pan around to combine.

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Pour into the yogurt mixture, mix well. Serve with 1 – 2 cups of cooked rice, garnish with fresh coriander.

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Goodness shared by Stacey

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