autumn

everyday simple dal for Yasmin

6th March 2017

4V7A6754_1980x1297

A simple dal we make weekly, served with chapati and along side a cabbage or okra palya.  A recipe my daughter requested that I write-up so that she can refer to when she moves out later this year.  It is also one of her favourite meal combinations.  We are in the process of learning how to make 6 easy meals which she can prepare herself.  This dal being one of them.

If the thought of making chapati sounds a bit over whelming – it can be served with a bowl of rice and a crispy salad.  When drizzled with ghee it becomes a deeply soothing, warming, nourishing meal.

The tomatoes can be replaced with any vegetable of choice,  I like the process of stewing them in a voggarane pan before adding them into the cooked dāl, this way they slightly caramalise, deepening the flavour with the spices.

4V7A0350_1980x1297 4V7A0339_1980x12974V7A0330_1980x1297IMG_3853_1980x1297

~ Evening forage at the end of the day in a blanket of mist.  Silent.

4V7A8443_1980x1297

everyday simple dal

Serves 3 – 4

Inspired by Tara O’brady – Everyday Yellow Dal.

In Ayurveda, it is important to understand the different types of dal/legumes used and their energetic qualities.  There are two dals which are favourable and used most often – whole mung beans (whole moong beans) and split moong dal (yellow split lentils) which are whole moong beans skinned and split.  These two are easy to digest, gentle on the system and cause minimum disturbances to your constitution.  All other dal/legumes are recommended to use in moderation and in small quantities.

4V7A9560_1_1980x1297

ingredients :

1 cup/220g yellow split moong dal (yellow split lentils)

3 cups/750ml water

for the voggarane :

2 Tblsp ghee

½ tsp black mustard seeds

1 tsp cumin seeds

8 fresh curry leaves

1 dried chilli – torn in half

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

1 tsp finely chopped ginger

1 medium tomato, chopped into small pieces

½ – 1 tsp fine rock salt

a small handful coriander leaves

juice from half a lemon

preparation :

In a heavy saucepan, wash dal several times until water runs clear – then drain.

Pour the 3 cups water into saucepan and bring to boil on a medium-high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.)  You may need to skim of any foam which accumulates at the top at the beginning of boiling.  Simmer until dāl is soft, creamy and broken down – approximately 30 minutes.  You may need to add a little water if the dal becomes too dry.  I like to have the consistency quite thick when serving with chapatis and more liquid when serving with rice.

While waiting for the dal to soften, prepare the voggarane.  In a small pan over medium heat, add the ghee, once hot add mustard seeds; as the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the cumin seed, curry leaves, fry for a few seconds, then add asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around allowing spices to fry evenly.  To the voggarane add the chopped tomatoes and ginger, cover and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, fry until the tomato starts to break up.

4V7A6739_1980x12974V7A6743_1980x1297

Stir this into the dal, add salt, lemon juice and garnish with fresh coriander.  Serve with fresh chapati, a cabbage or okra palya.

4V7A7433_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

a traditional Ayurvedic herbal drink – Kashaya

3rd December 2016

4V7A3340_1980x1297

Kashaya is a deeply nourishing and soothing drink that brings calmness to the mind and supports the general health and balance of the system. Kashaya is appropriate for all constitutions and in all seasons.  It is recommended to consume at the end of a meal and to have once – twice a day.  Kashaya balances Vata, Pitta and Kapha, helps maintain the digestive fire and reduces heat in the body.

There are many variations of Kashaya – Below are two very simple and easy to prepare recipes for everyday use. They require only two of the main spices – cumin and coriander.  The first is a Kashaya powder which involves lightly roasting and grinding the seeds and the second, a simple infusion using the whole seeds.

Considering your constitution, it is good to keep in mind that jaggery is more heating for the body than brown sugar.

4V7A3284_1980x1297

coriander seed:

Coriander is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, pungent and sweet in taste.  It evokes the digestive fire while simultaneously cooling and soothing. It tonifies, increases absorption, improves digestive enzymes, reduces nausea and blood pressure.  Coriander seed removes excess heat in the body, making it useful in cooling Pitta-related imbalances associated with menopause.  It also supports proper function of the kidneys and healthy urination. The seeds combine well with Cumin to make an excellent digestive tea.

cumin seed:

Cumin is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, Pungent and Astringent.  It is carminative, aromatic, and on the whole, cool in action.   A common household spice, its Sanskrit name literally means ‘promoting digestion’.  In addition to providing flavour to food, cumin evokes the digestive fire, promotes healthy absorption and eliminates natural toxins.  It is useful to the eyes, beneficial to the heart and strengthens the uterus.  It enhances immunity and invokes good sleep.

4V7A3312_1980x1297

Coriander-Cumin Kashaya Powder

This recipe was shared by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Sadvidya Yoga Diploma.  It came about as an aid to reduce Pitta disturbances in the body and to assist with interrupted sleep due to menopause.  It is deeply nourishing and satisfying drink to have after a meal and satisfies that sweet craving, as well as benefiting from its wonderful medicinal qualities.  The key to opening up the real flavour is making sure that you get the kashaya to a rolicking boil just before straining – the heat changes everything.

Makes approximately 18 – 20 cups Kashaya

ingredients for kashaya powder :

⅓ cup/35g whole cumin seed

½ cup/35g whole coriander seed

preparation :

On a medium flame, heat a skillet until it is hot to touch. Dry-roast the cumin seeds until their colour deepens and a noticeable smell appears – approximately 1 minute. Seeds may start popping by that point.  Be careful not to burn the spices as they can ruin the taste of the kashaya.  Set aside to cool.  Place the coriander seeds into the skillet and repeat the process – the coriander seeds will take 1½  minutes to roast.

In a powerful blender/coffee grinder, grind the toasted cumin seeds to a fine powder. Pour into a bowl and set aside.  Repeat with the toasted coriander seeds – these may take slightly longer to grind.  Pour into the bowl with the ground cumin and combine well.  Store in an airtight container.  

4V7A5889_1980x12974V7A5897_1980x1297

To preserve the medicinal qualities of the spices, it is recommended to make fresh every 10 – 14 days.

4V7A5906_1980x1297

to prepare the kashaya :

¾ cup water

1 heaped tsp Kashaya Powder

1 heaped tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 – 2 tsp/5 – 10mL milk (less milk is easier on the digestion, especially in the evening)

preparation:

In a small pan, pour in ¾ cup water and bring to boiling point.  Add the Kashaya powder and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk, stir and pour into a cup (no need to strain as drinking the layer of powder which collects at the bottom is beneficial for the medicinal properties). Set aside to cool until moderately warm.  Enjoy.

4V7A3334_1980x1297

 

Whole Coriander-Cumin Seed Kashaya

4V7A5548_1980x1297

1 serving

Don´t throw away those left over seeds after straining, place them in a pot outside your kitchen or in the garden – in no time you will have fresh greens to harvest for your cooking.

ingredients :

½ tsp whole coriander seeds

½ tsp whole cumin seeds

1 cup water

1 tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 tsp/5mL milk (optional)

preparation :

In a small pan, pour in 1 cup of water and bring to boiling point.  Add the whole coriander and cumin seeds and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk (if using), and strain the Kashaya.  Set aside to cool until moderately warm.

4V7A5524_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

almond quinoa chocolate bars

21st September 2016

4v7a7529_1980x1297

Cool softened air, full moon swell, falling leaves, savouring the light….

4v7a7558_1_1980x12974v7a7461_1980x12974v7a7558_1_1980x1297

These have been a decadent treat around here.  Loved by all.  Perfect when you need something more than a dried date or fig for a sweet after a meal.  Based on this recipe from Green Kitchen Stories – a wonderful video is included showing you just how easy they are to make.  I altered the recipe slightly, adding ¼ cup hot water to the dates when mashing them. Even though the dates I used were soft, the hot water helped in the overall consistency. Instead of pumpkin seeds, I used extra almonds and toasted them to make them snappy and to bring out their flavour. I prefer using just almonds, as their qualities are less heating than most other nuts and seeds.  You could use a carob topping instead of the chocolate, by melting down carob buttons or using this glaze.

4v7a7555_1980x1297

almond quinoa chocolate bars

Makes 16 squares.

ingredients:

2 Tblsp coconut oil

200g soft medjool dates – approximately 10 dates

¼ cup/60ml hot water

1 cup/250g home-made almond butter

1 Tblsp fresh ginger, grated

a pinch rock salt, optional

½ cup/55 grams toasted almonds/hazelnuts

1 cup/80g puffed quinoa

for the chocolate topping:

100g dark chocolate

3 Tblsp dried unsweetened coconut

preparation:

Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.

to roast the almonds:

Place the whole almonds/hazelnuts on a tray and toast for approximately 8 minutes.  If using hazelnuts – while they are still warm, rub the nuts in a towel to remove the skins.  Allow to cool, finely chop and set aside.

to make the almond quinoa bars:

Line a 7 x 7/8 x 10-inch baking tray with baking paper, leaving 2 inches around the edges.

Remove the seeds from the dates and measure out 200 grams.  Set aside.  Melt the coconut oil in a medium saucepan over low heat. Take off the heat and add the dates into the saucepan with the coconut oil.  Add the hot water and mash with a fork.  Mix in the almond butter, ginger and salt, stirring until it all comes together.  Remove from heat and add the puffed quinoa, chopped roasted almonds/hazelnuts, incorporating everything evenly.

Using your hands, press the mixture very tightly into the lined dish, until completely even and flat. Using the edges of the baking paper, fold over and run your finger along the edges to create level sides and corners.  Place in the freezer while preparing the chocolate coating.

to melt the chocolate topping:

Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over barely simmering water. Remove from heat, then using a spatula, spread the chocolate evenly over the slice. Sprinkle with half the shredded coconut, leaving the other half to sprinkle on later.

Place in the freezer for at least two hours, until cold and firm. Using a sharp knife, cut into bite-sized squares or rectangular bars. Store in an airtight container in the freezer. The bars will keep for a month.

4v7a7548_1_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

pepper rasam

26th July 2016

4V7A4108_1980x1297

Pepper Rasam is a simple and tasty liquid dish, considered tridhatus samya, balances all three doshas, Vata, Pitta, and Kapha.  It provokes the appetite and is helpful for indigestion. It helps to reduce nausea and is beneficial for those with high fever.  It may be consumed two or three times in a week.  It is recommended to be served with rice, a spoon of ghee and goes very well with steamed greens or a green bean palya.

4V7A6397_1980x12974V7A6391_1980x12974V7A6383_1980x12974V7A6390_1980x1297

~ Evening, Praia Do Guincho

4V7A4404_1980x1297

Pepper Rasam

Serves 3 – 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma.  For those with Vata imbalance, it is recommended to reduce the toor dal to cup.

Use heaped measurements except when stated otherwise.

ingredients:

⅓ – ½ cup toor dal

1 litre/4 cups water

1 tsp fine rock salt

4 tsp jaggery

¼ cup chopped coriander leaves

first voggarane:

2 tsp ghee 

½ tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp urad dal

½ – 1 tsp whole black peppercorns, depending on your preferred spice

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves 

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

½ cup shredded dried coconut

250ml/1 cup warm water

second voggarane :

1 tsp  ghee

1 tsp cumin seeds

6 fresh curry leaves

4V7A4370_1980x1297

preparation:

In a heavy saucepan, wash toor dal several times until water runs clear – then drain.  Pour water into saucepan and bring to boil on a medium-high heat, then reduce heat to maintain a rapid simmer. (Do not cover the pot, this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.) Simmer until dal is soft and broken down – approximately 30 – 40 minutes, 2 – 3 cups of liquid remaining.

first voggarane:

In a small pan/bandalei over medium heat, add 2 tsp ghee, once hot add mustard seeds; as the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add urad dal, whole peppercorns, and 1 tsp cumin seed. Once urad dal is golden brown, add 6 curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder, swishing the pan around allowing spices to fry evenly. Pour into the voggarane, dried coconut and 1 cup warm water, stir to combine then pour into blender. Blend until smooth, approximately 1 minute.

4V7A4695_1980x12974V7A4698_1980x1297

Add mixture to dal, use liquid from dal to swish blender clean, add back into the dal.  Add salt and jaggery – mix well and set aside.

second voggarane:

Tear remaining 6 curry leaves in half (this way everyone gets a curry leaf, receiving their benefits), set aside.

In the first voggarane pan/bandalei, over medium heat, add remaining ghee, once hot add 1 tsp cumin seeds and torn curry leaves. Fry until the seeds are golden-brown (careful not to burn the cumin.) Pour voggarane into dal, and stir in chopped coriander leaves.  Allow to sit for 5 minutes before tasting, adding more jaggery or salt as needed.  Serve with rice, green bean palya or sauteed greens and drizzle with a spoon of ghee.

4V7A4414_1980x1297

 Goodness shared by Stacey

lemon barley water

27th March 2016

barley water table

Barley has a cooling thermal nature; sweet and astringent in taste.  Traditionally given to calm sore stomachs.

4V7A2718_1980x12974V7A2706_1980x12974V7A2711_1980x1297

-Marguerite daisy, also known as the Argyranthemum frutescens

barley water closeup

lemon barley water

Makes just over 1.2 – 1.5 litres

Recipe adapted from Spring the cookbook.

Lovely soothing, yet thirst quenching, drink.  You can add other flavouring to it besides lemon and honey – lemon verbena or ginger would work well.  Don’t discard the cooked barley.  Recipe to follow, or stir through a vegetable soup, or dress it simply with a little olive oil and lemon juice and add to a salad.

ingredients :

1 cup /200g pearl barley

10 cups/2.5 litres filtered water

3 – 4 Tblsp light-flavoured honey

3  Tblsp lemon juice, or more to taste

preparation :

Rinse the barley several times until the water runs clear, then pour into a saucepan and add the filtered water.  Bring to boil over a medium heat, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook uncovered until the barley is tender, this will take about 35 – 40 minutes.  Strain, reserving the cooking water, and set the barley aside.

Run the barley water through a thinner strainer into a pouring jug, add the honey, stirring until dissolved.  Allow to cool.

Add the lemon juice, taste, adding more honey or lemon as needed.

barleywater closeup

Goodness shared by Stacey

Kristin’s cinnamon spiced Moroccan stew

20th January 2016

4V7A0725_1980x1297-2

Since arriving home from our American trip a few weeks ago, I have been ‘nesting’ in my home, cooking, baking, moving things about, filing, organising, simplifying, and creating things, all inspired by my stay in Sebastopol and that lingering sense of being held, nurtured and a deep inner feeling of peace I felt there.

This tasty Moroccan stew is inspired by Kristin, who made it for dinner one rainy, chilly evening. I have been making it weekly for Jonathan to take to work and for the children’s school lunches, or in the evenings for a warming, cozy, comforting stew.

This was a recipe Kristin had written down for me and sent by ‘snail’ mail years ago, but I had never gotten around to making it.  So when I arrived home from our trip, I set about rifling through my drawers, walls, cupboards, mirrors, where I have all of her artwork and things stuck – to find it.  I keep all of her letters as they hold such soft, peaceful beauty and the art inside always inspires.  She says I am her muse, but she is my teacher, in so many, many ways – I admire her authenticity to this yogic lifestyle and teachings, and her simple living as a householder.  She has the ability to live with such modesty, surrounded by natural beauty as you can see by the images below – but still maintains a balance as she moves in this world.  I am ever grateful to be moving on this path with her.

kristin in windowkristin kitchen windowinspiration kristin house

– Sebastopol, California

4V7A0716_1980x1297

Kristin’s cinnamon spiced Moroccan stew with couscous

serves 4 

I always keep bags of pre-cooked chickpeas in my freezer for easy meals during the week – Chickpeas that have been soaked overnight and simmered until soft.  A few pinches of bicarbonate soda added when simmering helps to soften them.  I also find freshly ground spices where possible make all the difference to the flavours of the finished dish.  The cinnamon & cumin has such an exotic aroma, flooding your senses with a ‘little of divine’.   It is delicious.  Use any combination of vegetables – carrots, sweet potato, pumpkin, eggplant, zucchini, beans – all combined to make at least 5 – 6 cups of finely chopped or sliced vegetables…

for the couscous:

2 cups couscous

3½ cups boiling water

½ tsp salt

2 heaping tablespoons ghee/butter

½ cup roughly chopped almonds

for the stew:

cup olive oil

1 heaped tsp cumin seeds

1 heaped tsp turmeric powder

½ tsp cinnamon – preferably Indian – a spicy, strong cinnamon

½ tsp good quality paprika

a combination of approximately 5 – 6 cups of finely chopped vegetables – 

1 large fennel/2 sticks celery

1 large red bell pepper

2 large tomatoes

2 small carrots

1 small sweet potato/wedge of pumpkin

1 cup cabbage

1 cup pre-cooked chickpeas

1 – 2 cups water

2 Tblsp small dried currants/ jaggery

salt & pepper, to taste

4V7A0748_1980x1297

prepare the couscous:

In a medium saucepan, place the couscous, ghee and boiling water.  Stir to combine, cover and allow to sit for 20 minutes, undisturbed.

prepare the stew:

In a small pan, dry-roast the cumin seeds until slightly golden.  Allow to cool and grind in a mortar and pestle.  Set aside.

Wash, peel where necessary and finely chop the vegetables, keeping them separate.

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan, and saute the celery and red pepper until soft, add the chopped tomatoes, the ground cumin, turmeric, cinnamon and paprika, stir to combine. Depending on the choice of vegetables, add them bit by bit, adding the starchier vegetables first as they take the longest to cook.  Once all the vegetables have been added, add the water and the pre-cooked chickpeas. Cover and stew on low until the vegetables are slightly softened.  When cooked, season with salt, stir in the dried currants/jaggery and sprinkle with chopped fresh parsley/coriander.

Fluff the couscous with a fork, and garnish with the roughly chopped almonds.

Serve in a bowl, a generous helping of couscous, a bountiful scoop of Moroccan stew, garnish with more almonds and freshly chopped coriander/parsley.  A few good rounds of pepper, and if desired, a crumbling of feta or grated parmesan.

4V7A0762_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

chocolate covered ‘caramels’

20th December 2015

4V7A9635_1980x1297

The rain has been heavy and relentless these last days.  The air thick with mist & fog, so much so I cannot see the vegetable garden from where I sit.  No choice but to stay inside, to go inside.  It feels like an offering, one where everything must slow down.  A reminder to appreciate and be thankful for all these blessings which tend to pass by.

A few photos taken awhile back, on drier sunnier days

4V7A7929_1980x1297 4V7A7939_1980x1297 4V7A7943_1980x12974V7A9669_1980x1297

These are a lovely gift to give to family & friends for the holiday season, just wrap them up in some recycled paper, a ribbon with a little bit of nature tucked in somewhere.  Some other ideas are these homemade raw halvah & zesty mango bliss balls.  Or an assortment of all three!

4V7A9658_1980x1297

chocolate covered ‘caramels’

makes 14 bite-sized balls

Recipe inspired from ‘Trinity’s Conscious Kitchen’

These are a really special indulgent sweet, a favourite with my husband.  

Once set, the texture is a lovely chocolate crunch on the outside with a soft gooey caramel on the inside. And no nasty sugars or additives. To speed up the process, you could easily melt down your favourite chocolate bar.

The original recipe used 2 tablespoons of Lucama powder (a dried, sweet fruit packed with nutrients and goodness) into the caramel.  A great way to add a superfood into your diet. 

for the caramel bites

100g medjool dates, pitted – about 7 large dates (can use regular dates, but keep in mind soaking time will be longer)

4 Tbsp coconut butter

for the dark vanilla chocolate

25g cocoa butter

15g cacao powder

2½ Tbsp coconut sugar

1 tsp vanilla essence

chopped toasted almonds & coconut for garnish

preparation:

Line a baking tray with parchment paper and set aside.

Soak the dates for at least an hour in filtered water.

Drain the dates and blend with the coconut butter.  Use a hand blender/immersion blender as this seems to work best.  You will have to scrape down the bowl and blade as you blend.  Place the mixture in the freezer for 15 minutes to thicken a little before rolling.

After fifteen minutes, take the caramel mixture from the freezer.  Using a heaped teaspoon of the mixture, roll into a small ball about half the size of a golf ball.

Place the balls onto the lined tray and place in the freezer for half an hour (This will make the chocolate dipping easier).

Prepare the vanilla chocolate dipping sauce.  Put an inch or two of water in a small saucepan and bring to a faint simmer.  Place another small non-reactive bowl (glass works well) on top so that it sits over the water, but is not touching the bottom of the saucepan.  ‘Shave’ the cocoa butter with a sharp knife and place into the bowl (shaving the coconut butter will make it easier to melt).  Add the coconut sugar into the bowl and stir to combine.  When the cocoa butter has melted,  sift in the cocoa powder, drizzle in the vanilla essence and whisk until completely smooth.  Remove from the stove, cool the chocolate mixture ever so slightly, keeping it runny, but not too runny for dipping.

Dip the caramel balls into the chocolate mixture.  I find using a fork helps scoop them out of the chocolate and to place them back onto the tray. Sprinkle with chopped almonds or coconut and repeat with the remaining caramel mixture.  Place in the fridge to set for half an hour.  Once the caramel balls have set, keep them in a sealed container in the fridge.

4V7A9665_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

vegan strawberry-filled Hanukkah doughnuts (sufganiyot)

10th December 2015

4V7A9831_1980x1297

This is the first year I have made these ‘sufganiyot’.  They were requested for dessert after the lighting of the candles.  Hanukkah is my favourite celebration, with the evening ritual of light, candles and all that wonderful fried food, which I tend to avoid throughout the year.

I enjoy living with a conscious choice of eating and preparing healthy, clean food, but I still enjoy some of the more indulgent foods from time to time.  I appreciate food and through my lifestyle, I have gained a deeper understanding of how food affects my physical, mental, emotional health, and in turn, my meditation practice.

With that in mind, I have also come to understand that anything made with heart-felt gratitude, pure and good intention, and shared with like-minded loved ones, feeds the mind, body and soul and leads us to a higher consciousness.  Even when there is deep-frying and powdered sugar involved!

Magic is involved when dough hits hot oil.  It is a miracle right before your eyes – you will understand when you make these.

4V7A9829_1980x12974V7A9818_1980x12974V7A9829_1980x1297

strawberry jam filled doughnuts

makes approximately 20 doughnuts 

I find when deep-frying the doughnuts, it is best to deep fry in a cast-iron pot, as it keeps the oil at an even consistent temperature.  

This is a good site to judge how hot the oil should be without the use of a temperature thermometer.

I aimed for a smaller doughnut but you can make them as small or as large as you wish.  If wanting to make the doughnuts in stages, or to make only a few, prepare the dough, divide and refrigerate half of the dough overnight.  Bring the dough to room temperature the next day, which will take about 30 minutes, and proceed with the instructions below.  

for the wet ingredients:

1 Tblsp chia seeds

3 Tblsp water

¾ cup nut milk (room temperature)

3 Tblsp oil of choice

1 Tblsp vanilla extract

for the dry ingredients:

250g white spelt flour

100g whole spelt flour

50g/¼ cup light brown sugar

1 Tblsp dried yeast

½ tsp Himalayan salt

1 bottle canola, sunflower or peanut oil for frying

for the filling:

½ cup strawberry jam

powdered sugar, for sprinkling

preparation:

In a medium bowl, combine the chia seeds, water and nut milk.  Stir to combine and set aside for twenty minutes.  Once the chia seeds have gelled, add the oil and vanilla extract, then whisk to combine.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl or the bowl of a stand-mixer fitted with a dough hook, mix together the salt, flour, sugar and sprinkle over the dried yeast.  Add the wet ingredients to the flour mixture and stir to combine.  Knead, either by hand on a floured surface or with a dough hook for 7 – 10 minutes, until you have a smooth and slightly sticky dough.

Transfer the dough to a well-oiled bowl, turning several times to coat entirely with oil.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit in a nice warm area in your kitchen, until it has doubled in size, about 2 hours.

 

Once the dough has risen, give it a quick knead and on a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to 1 centimeter thickness.  Using a 2-inch cookie cutter (or a glass), cut out about 20 (2-inch) circles, dipping the cutter in flour as needed to prevent sticking.  Re-roll scraps until the dough is used up.

Line a baking tray with a clean kitchen towel and place the circles onto the towel.  Cover loosely with plastic wrap and allow to rise until puffy, 20 – 30 minutes.

4V7A9765_1980x1297

When ready, heat a few inches of oil in a large cast-iron pan until it reaches 340F/170C or a scrape of dough sizzles upon contact.  You don’t want it too hot as you want to allow time for the doughnuts to cook through.  Fry in batches of 4 or 5 (depending on the size of your pot), turning once, until golden, for approximately 30 seconds on each side (the doughnuts will float and fry quickly and puff up).  The doughnuts may flip over by themselves, but some may need help.  Use a slotted spoon to transfer them to paper towels to drain.

To fill them – When the doughnuts are cool enough to handle, use a chopstick to poke a hole in the side and rotate it to create a space for the filling.  With a piping bag or small zip-lock bag with the corner cut, squeeze a good helping of strawberry jam into the doughnuts and sprinkle generously with powdered sugar.  The doughnuts are best serve immediately.  Happy Hanukka!

4V7A9828_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

carrot & mung dal soup – a winter warming soup

6th December 2015

4V7A9724_1980x1297

I thought I would re-visit this soup, as it is one I make most often in the colder months and a particular favourite of Donna’s.  It is also very quick and easy to prepare and has such simple flavours and warmth due to the pepper and ginger added, which helps to keep us nourished and grounded in these colder months.  Dry roasting and roughly grinding your own spices make all the difference to bring out the flavours, don’t be tempted to skip this process.

Out of all the pulses, mung dahl (green gram) is one I use most often; as it has a calming, cooling and balancing effect on all dosha’s.  It is also very cleansing and medicinal.  The tomatoes can easily be omitted if desired; as the lemon juice adds the acidity that this soup requires.

A few memorable images from our recent retreat in India.

4V7A9074_1980x1297banyan tree cloudscapeholy water tap

– Sri Ramana Maharshi Ashram

– Banyan Tree, Fireflys Resort

– Illuminating cloudscape

4V7A9740_1980x1297

carrot & mung dal soup

The original recipe is from Yamuna Devi’s, The Vegetable Table.  It is a little worn and splotched on most pages from over-enthusiastic use.  A great book to start with when wanting to cook good, wholesome Indian meals without the addition of onion or garlic.  There is also a sense of devotional cooking in all the recipes she makes which I really like.

This is my version of her soup with a few changes.  The original recipe uses split mung/moong dal (yellow) which results in a lighter soup. I particularly prefer using the whole mung dal for a heartier Winter soup.

Serves 4

ingredients :

1 cup whole mung dal

8 cups filtered water

4 medium carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

3 whole cardamom pods (peeled and seeds crushed)

1 inch piece of fresh ginger, finely chopped

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 tsp whole coriander seeds

1 small plum tomato, finely chopped

1 – 2 Tblsp ghee/oil

1 dried chilli, torn in half

6 fresh curry leaves, optional

¼ tsp asafoetida powder, optional

juice of half a lemon, or more to taste

salt

1 tsp freshly ground pepper

handful fresh coriander, chopped

preparation:

Wash the mung dal in a bowl, swishing the grains in several changes of water until it runs clear.  Combine the mung dal, carrot, water, ginger, and cardamom pods in a large soup pot and bring to boil.  Reduce to a simmer, partly cover and cook until the mung dal are broken down and soft; anywhere from 30 to 40 minutes.

In a small pan over moderate heat, dry roast the cumin and coriander seeds until golden and deeply fragrant.  Place in a mortar and pestle, and grind into a rough powder.  Add this to the mung dal with the chopped tomatoes and fresh coriander leaves.

To finish the dish, warm ghee/oil in a small pan, add the torn dried chilli pieces, fresh curry leaves and asafoetida powder, fry for thirty seconds, remove from heat and pour into the soup.  Season with salt, pepper and the juice of half a lemon or more to taste.  I find the lemon juice and freshly ground pepper bring this soup together, so you may want to add more.  Drizzle with a little melted ghee when serving.

This soup is great served with your favourite bread toasted and a bowl of guacamole or if trying to avoid bread make a pot of red rice or quinoa and serve a spoon in each bowl of soup.

4V7A9708_1980x1297

Goodness shared from Stacey

good morning live apple oatmeal with tahini sauce

24th November 2015

because it’s still THAT sort of weather..

4V7A9546_1980x12974V7A9544_1980x1297 4V7A9529_1980x12974V7A9553_1980x1297

or should I say… ‘It WAS that sort of weather’….

4V7A9327_1980x1297

good morning live apple oatmeal with tahini sauce

A favourite with my daughter as a light meal before she goes to school, her preference is served with a spoon of thick greek yogurt & a drizzling of honey.

serves 1

ingredients :

1 large apple

squeeze of fresh lemon juice

1 tsp each goji berries, sunflower & pumpkin seeds (soaked overnight)

1 Tbsp ground flaxseed

tahini sauce

1 Tblsp tahini

2 Tblsp water

½ tsp honey/maple syrup

¼ tsp cinnamon

preparation:

Drain the berries and seeds, set aside.

Grate the apple with a box grater, leaving the skin on.  Toss immediately with lemon juice to prevent browning.

Sprinkle over the ground flax seeds, goji berries and seeds.

In a small bowl combine the tahini sauce ingredient adding water until a pouring consistency is achieved. Drizzle over the apple oatmeal and serve immediately.

4V7A9353_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

All rights reserved © Goodness is…. · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie