borage

11th June 2014

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borage

Because I never tire of it,

Borage supposedly has properties that give a feeling of euphoria, or what I would call happiness.  It’s said to give courage, joy and heart to anyone who eats the flowers or makes tea from the leaves.  Borage expels pensiveness and melancholy.  Borage flowers in the house help bring domestic tranquillity.  The flowers sprinkled in the bath are good for courage or for protection.  A cup of borage tea can help with feelings of vulnerability and disjointedness.  Whatever it grows near it is ‘lifted up’ and made stronger by it.

How can one not admire that kind of unconditional giving?

The fresh young leaves are good for salads, although having tried this, I am not too keen on the fuzzy texture.  The leaves are great for special effect, as they spark and pop when they are burned due to their mineral content.  Both the leaves and the pretty blue flowers smell and taste slightly like salty cucumber.  The taste I found very much like drinking hot cucumber juice but mixed with mint it is especially cooling and much more palatable.  Try freezing the flowers in an ice-cube for a nice garnish to herbal iced tea in summer.  According to folklore, if the person drinking the tea is someone you would like to marry,  it will give them the courage to propose.  The flowers will keep their colour if dried carefully.

It is okay to use this herb as a condiment, but avoid eating in large amounts on a regular basis, as it contains alkaloids believed to harm the liver.

I always directly sow the seeds in the ground just after the last frost, but this depends on where you live.  Borage is a good companion plant for tomatoes, squash and strawberries.  Plant in a bunch so they can support each other – they flop over in windy areas. Bees love the flowers, which have a lot of nectar. The flowers are normally blue, but sometimes they will be pink, even on the same plant.  Borage self-seed when happy.

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borage & mint tea

In a cup of boiling water, place a few roughly chopped borage leaves, a few flowers and fresh mint leaves.

Always cover the tea when steeping to keep the volatile oils which hold all of its beneficial health benefits.

Find a quiet place outside.  Sit, listen and enjoy.

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References:

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/borage66.html

http://thebendytreerecipes.blogspot.pt/2009/07/borage-herbal-tea-or-tisane.html

Whole Foods Companion by Dianne Onstad

Goodness shared from Stacey

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