roasted carrot, cauliflower, whole moong dal, mustard & greens

10th January 2017

4v7a8552_1980x1297

So good to have my site back.  It had disappeared for 10 days – having it back was like having the comfort of an old friend.

We just came back from a holiday with my husband’s family travelling through parts of Kerala in the South of India.  We started in Cochin, staying in a lovely place called The Eight Bastion in Fort Kochi, where the food was exceptional, and prepared by a wonderful chef who catered for all our odd dietary needs taking such pride,care and enthusiasm in everything he prepared – there was no need to venture out for our meals.  We saw the Chinese fishing nets and visited a few local churches and a Synagogue – in the heart of Fort Kochi.  We then travelled high up into the hill stations of Munnar.  This part of the trip was my favourite.  We stayed at a lovely resort called ‘The Spice Tree” where we were literally up in the clouds.

We went on hikes through the plantations and saw all sorts of spices grown – peppercorns, cardamom, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and even had a go at cutting and harvesting rice.  The evening sunset walks were particularly special, enjoying the breath-taking views down into the valley.  The last part of our trip was exploring the backwaters. We spent a day on one of the typical house-boats made of teak and bamboo – observing how the local people lived on the water, using the river to bathe, to wash their clothes and dishes, as a source of food and transport and everything in between., we watched palm tree after palm tree pass us by, paddy fields and colourful houses and a romantic way of life that seems unchanged for centuries.  This is the beauty of Kerala.

For the last 25 years, we have been travelling to India, and this was the first time as a tourist, rather than a budding yoga practitioner.  India as always, presented her magic and opened all our hearts – it was a truly memorable and magical trip.

4v7a8688_1_1980x1297img_3484 4v7a9239_1980x1297 4v7a9294_1980x1297

~ Chinese fishing nets in a bright sky at Fort Cochin

~ Tea Plantations taken from the bus window at the end of a winding, five hour journey, Munnar

~ Domestic chores along the river, Kumarakom

~ Water, vegetation and sky all become one, Back waters

4v7a8478_1980x1297

a warm salad of mustard, roasted carrot cauliflower & moong dal

Recipe slightly adapted from Grown and Gathered.

Don’t be shy with the kale greens, just make it green and lots of it.  I love how the carrot adds a splash of colour; roasted beets would also work.  I serve it with a whole avocado, sliced and spread into a fan, and slices of grilled haloumi. It is also great with a bowl of hummus.  A great dish to take along to a lunch or dinner.

Serves 4 as a side dish or 2 as a main.

ingredients :

400g carrots or Baby (Dutch) tops trimmed to 2cm

½ head/400g cauliflower

½ cup/100g whole moong dal (whole mung bean)

3 cups water

120g kale, mustard greens, chard, spinach, coarsely chopped

mustard dressing :

1 Tblsp yellow mustard seeds

2 Tblsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tblsp brown sugar/jaggery/honey

zest from two lemons

vinaigrette :

2 Tblsp extra-virgin olive oil

4 Tblsp lemon juice (1 large lemon)

½ tsp fine rock salt

⅛ tsp ground black pepper

1 Tblsp honey/sugar (optional)

preparation :

Pre-heat the oven to 190 C/ 375F.

Cut the cauliflower into rough 4 cm florets, and place in a large bowl.  Peel the carrots and cut into matchsticks, about 5 cm in length. Place in a large bowl and set aside.

Using a mortar and pestle, grind the mustard seeds until about half are ground and half are cracked. Add the remaining dressing ingredients and continue to grind gently until combined.  Pour the dressing over the cauliflower and carrot. Toss, using your hands until thoroughly combined.  Spread the vegetables out on a baking tray in a single layer and roast for 45min – 1 hour, or until the vegetables are just beginning to blacken around the edges.

4v7a8449_1980x1297

Wash the moong dal (whole mung beans) thoroughly and place in a saucepan with the water. Bring to a rapid simmer and leave, uncovered until they are tender – about 20 – 30 minutes. Just keep in mind you may have to add more water when cooking – depending on the quality of your dal. You really need to keep an eye on them and judge so that you are not left with mush. You want the mung beans firm, but cooked. When ready, pour into a strainer to drain off any excess water – leave for a few minutes.

Prepare the vinaigrette – place the oil, lemon juice, zest, honey, salt and pepper in a jar. Seal with a lid and shake well.  Set aside.

Wash the mustard and kale leaves, removing the inner thicker stem from the kale and chard, and roughly chop.  Lightly saute in a heavy-bottomed skillet, turn off the heat and cover for a few minutes until just wilted. Place in a large salad or serving bowl, pour over the vinaigrette and roughly massage with your hands to bruise the leaves.  Add the cooked moong dal and toss gently.  The heat from the dal will help soften the leaves even more.  Set aside for the flavours to come together while the vegetables are still roasting.

4v7a8440_1980x1297

When the vegetables are ready, add them to the marinated greens and dal and gently combine.  Garnish the top with a large avocado, sliced and spread out into a fan, then add a few good rounds of freshly ground pepper and serve immediately.

4v7a8551_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

chocolate-hazelnut truffles & pecan-cardamom date balls

17th December 2016

4V7A9374_1980x1297

These make a wonderful healthy addition to bring along to a festive celebration or wrap them up in some recycled paper, a ribbon with a little bit of nature tucked in somewhere for a well-wisher or loved one.  They are always appreciated.  Some other ideas are these homemade raw halvah or zesty mango bliss balls or these chocolate covered caramels  Or an assortment of all three!

4V7A9377_1980x1297

chocolate – toasted hazelnut truffles

You could experiment with the different variations of these chocolate balls by adding orange or lemon zest, fresh mint, peppermint essence or even delicately salted.  For a smoother consistency, grind the nuts first, and then add the rest of the ingredients.

I like how toasting brings out the rich flavour in the nuts, if wanting to keep the truffles raw skip the toasting process.

Inspired by Donna’s Date Chocolate Balls & Green Kitchen Stories

Makes about 18 – 20 balls

ingredients :

15 large medjool dates, pitted

50g dried unsweetened shredded coconut

100g toasted hazelnuts/almonds

1 Tbsp extra virgin coconut oil

2 – 4 Tbsp cacao/carob powder

1 Tblsp water

1 tsp cinnamon powder

preparation :

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F.

Place the hazelnuts on a tray and toast for 12 minutes, (until fragrant, careful not to burn them) roll in a clean tea towel to remove some of the skin.  The toasting brings out the warm rich hazelnut flavour.

Place all the ingredients for the chocolate-hazelnut truffles in a food processor, and pulse for about 1 minute or until the mixture comes together.  Take a small amount of the mixture and roll into small round balls.  If you are having trouble with the mixture coming together, place the dough in the  fridge for 15 minutes.  Rolls the balls in cocoa/carob powder, finely chopped toasted almond flakes or shredded coconut. Place in the fridge for 20 minutes before serving.  Or package them into a jar tied with ribbon or raffia for a holiday gift offering.

4V7A9368_1980x1297

 

pecan – cardamom spiced date balls

I love these bite size balls for their exotic taste!  If possible, grind your own cardamom as the taste is so much more fragrant, fresher and more intense.  An easy way to do this is place 3 tablespoons of cardamom pods in a high-speed blender or coffee grinder, and roughly grind. Use a strainer to sift the ground pods, discard the shells and grind the bigger chunks again to a finer powder.  

A recipe inspired by Anna

Makes 18 – 20

ingredients :

12 large medjool dates, pitted

50g dried cranberries/goji berries (if using goji berries roughly chop)

50g dried unsweetened shredded coconut

100g raw pecans/toasted almonds

1 Tblsp extra virgin coconut oil

2 Tblsp freshly ground cardamom

1 Tblsp water

1 tsp ginger powder/1 Tblsp grated fresh ginger

preparation :

Place all the ingredients for the pecan-cardamom truffles in a food processor, and pulse for about a minute or until the mixture comes together. Take a small amount of the mixture and roll into small round balls; half the size of a golf ball.  If you are having trouble with the mixture coming together, place the dough in the fridge for 15 minutes.  Rolls the balls in finely chopped toasted pecans or shredded coconut.  Place in the fridge for 20 minutes before serving.  Or package them into a jar tied with ribbon or raffia for a holiday gift offering.

4V7A9372_1980x1297Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

a traditional Ayurvedic herbal drink – Kashaya

3rd December 2016

4V7A3340_1980x1297

Kashaya is a deeply nourishing and soothing drink that brings calmness to the mind and supports the general health and balance of the system. Kashaya is appropriate for all constitutions and in all seasons.  It is recommended to consume at the end of a meal and to have once – twice a day.  Kashaya balances Vata, Pitta and Kapha, helps maintain the digestive fire and reduces heat in the body.

There are many variations of Kashaya – Below are two very simple and easy to prepare recipes for everyday use. They require only two of the main spices – cumin and coriander.  The first is a Kashaya powder which involves lightly roasting and grinding the seeds and the second, a simple infusion using the whole seeds.

Considering your constitution, it is good to keep in mind that jaggery is more heating for the body than brown sugar.

4V7A3284_1980x1297

coriander seed:

Coriander is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, pungent and sweet in taste.  It evokes the digestive fire while simultaneously cooling and soothing. It tonifies, increases absorption, improves digestive enzymes, reduces nausea and blood pressure.  Coriander seed removes excess heat in the body, making it useful in cooling Pitta-related imbalances associated with menopause.  It also supports proper function of the kidneys and healthy urination. The seeds combine well with Cumin to make an excellent digestive tea.

cumin seed:

Cumin is one of the best herbs for supporting healthy digestion.  Bitter, Pungent and Astringent.  It is carminative, aromatic, and on the whole, cool in action.   A common household spice, its Sanskrit name literally means ‘promoting digestion’.  In addition to providing flavour to food, cumin evokes the digestive fire, promotes healthy absorption and eliminates natural toxins.  It is useful to the eyes, beneficial to the heart and strengthens the uterus.  It enhances immunity and invokes good sleep.

4V7A3312_1980x1297

Coriander-Cumin Kashaya Powder

This recipe was shared by our teacher, Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Sadvidya Yoga Diploma.  It came about as an aid to reduce Pitta disturbances in the body and to assist with interrupted sleep due to menopause.  It is deeply nourishing and satisfying drink to have after a meal and satisfies that sweet craving, as well as benefiting from its wonderful medicinal qualities.  The key to opening up the real flavour is making sure that you get the kashaya to a rolicking boil just before straining – the heat changes everything.

Makes approximately 18 – 20 cups Kashaya

ingredients for kashaya powder :

⅓ cup/35g whole cumin seed

½ cup/35g whole coriander seed

preparation :

On a medium flame, heat a skillet until it is hot to touch. Dry-roast the cumin seeds until their colour deepens and a noticeable smell appears – approximately 1 minute. Seeds may start popping by that point.  Be careful not to burn the spices as they can ruin the taste of the kashaya.  Set aside to cool.  Place the coriander seeds into the skillet and repeat the process – the coriander seeds will take 1½  minutes to roast.

In a powerful blender/coffee grinder, grind the toasted cumin seeds to a fine powder. Pour into a bowl and set aside.  Repeat with the toasted coriander seeds – these may take slightly longer to grind.  Pour into the bowl with the ground cumin and combine well.  Store in an airtight container.  

4V7A5889_1980x12974V7A5897_1980x1297

To preserve the medicinal qualities of the spices, it is recommended to make fresh every 10 – 14 days.

4V7A5906_1980x1297

to prepare the kashaya :

¾ cup water

1 heaped tsp Kashaya Powder

1 heaped tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 – 2 tsp/5 – 10mL milk (less milk is easier on the digestion, especially in the evening)

preparation:

In a small pan, pour in ¾ cup water and bring to boiling point.  Add the Kashaya powder and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk, stir and pour into a cup (no need to strain as drinking the layer of powder which collects at the bottom is beneficial for the medicinal properties). Set aside to cool until moderately warm.  Enjoy.

4V7A3334_1980x1297

 

Whole Coriander-Cumin Seed Kashaya

4V7A5548_1980x1297

1 serving

Don´t throw away those left over seeds after straining, place them in a pot outside your kitchen or in the garden – in no time you will have fresh greens to harvest for your cooking.

ingredients :

½ tsp whole coriander seeds

½ tsp whole cumin seeds

1 cup water

1 tsp brown sugar/jaggery

1 tsp/5mL milk (optional)

preparation :

In a small pan, pour in 1 cup of water and bring to boiling point.  Add the whole coriander and cumin seeds and sugar.  Allow to simmer for a few minutes.  Turn off the heat, add the milk (if using), and strain the Kashaya.  Set aside to cool until moderately warm.

4V7A5524_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

sweet parsnip fries

16th November 2016

4v7a8028_1980x1297

Parsnips are a ivory-cream root vegetable, their taste slightly astringent with a gentle earthy sweetness.

Parsnips taste sweeter as the soil temperature drops – the starch in them turns to sugar – so they’ll be at their best just after a cold snap. These tender morsels are lovely as a garnish in a hot soup like this one, steamed, mashed to a puree, roasted in ghee, served like this with a mayonnaise or tossed in a winter salad.

4v7a8052_1980x1297 4v7a8055_1980x1297 4v7a8071_1980x1297

~ this morning, glorious colours of Autumn, lighting up the mistiest of mornings…

4v7a8040_1980x1297

sweet parsnip fries

Serves 4, as a side dish

When buying organic I usually leave the peel on my root vegetables but with parsnips – the skin tends to toughen on cooking, so it is best to peel. 

ingredients :

7 medium/480g parsnips

2 Tblsp ghee/oil

rock salt

freshly ground pepper

preparation :

Preheat oven to 210C/410F.

Rinse the parsnips and scrub well under running water and peel the skin off them, with a sharp knife cut into fry shapes about 1 cm thick.  Place them in a bowl of water, move them around a few times, allow to soak for 10 minutes, then drain.  This step helps to remove some of the starch and improves the crispness.  Place the parsnip fries on a dry towel and dry them well – very important. Allow them to air dry for 15 minutes.

4v7a8020_1980x12974v7a8022_1980x1297

Once dry, place in a large bowl, drizzle over the melted ghee/oil and using your hands toss well until well coated in oil.

Pour the parsnip fries on a lined baking sheet, (may need to use two) and arrange them so they are not over lapping. Bake for 30 – 40 minutes until golden brown.  No need to flip them halfway during cooking.  Serve immediately.

4v7a8039_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

golden-crusted brussel sprouts

1st November 2016

4V7A0465_1980x1297

Just back from our yearly retreat in India.  Feeling FULL of stillness and quiet…

4v7a7818_1980x12974v7a7897_1980x12974v7a7790_1980x1297

A recipe created last year for Holmes Place magazine as part of an ongoing concept of seasonal ‘superfoods’ through out the year.

Brussels sprouts are a warming food that support the stomach and large intestine.  They are very similar to cabbage and have a similar range of cancer fighting compounds.  Brussels sprouts are rich in many valuable nutrients.  They are an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin K. They are a very good source of numerous nutrients including folate, manganese, vitamin B6, dietary fiber, choline, copper, vitamin B1, potassium, phosphorus, and omega-3 fatty acids.   They are often recommended for chronic fatigue, headaches, and hypertension.

4V7A0457_1980x1297

golden-crusted brussels sprouts

Serves 4

I love how easy brussels sprouts are to prepare and how the require very little seasoning to make them shine.  Look for brussels sprouts that are small and tightly closed.  The smaller ones cook through quicker, whereas the larger ones tend to brown on the outside long before the insides are done.  A lovely side dish to serve with a simple dal and rice.

Inspired by 101 Cookbooks

ingredients :

24 small brussels sprouts

2 Tablespoon melted ghee\olive oil

zest from one lemon

1 Tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

fine rock salt and freshly ground pepper

preparation :

Wash and pat dry the brussels sprouts.  Trim the stem ends and remove any raggy outer leaves.  Cut in half from the stem to the top and toss them gently in a bowl with a tablespoon of melted ghee or olive oil, being careful to keep them intact.

Heat 1 Tablespoon of ghee or oil in a large skillet over medium heat.  Do not overheat the skillet, or the outside of the brussels sprouts will cook too quickly.  Place the brussels sprouts in the pan flat side down in a single layer, sprinkle with salt, cover, and cook for approximately 5 minutes; the bottoms of the sprouts should only show a hint of browning.  Cut into or taste one of the sprouts to check whether they are tender throughout.  If not, cover and cook for a few more minutes.

Once just tender, uncover, turn up the heat, and cook until the flat sides are golden brown and caramelized.  Use a metal spatula to toss them once or twice to get some browning on the rounded side.  Season with more salt, a few grinds of pepper, a sprinkling of lemon zest and a squeeze of lemon juice.  They are almost like eating candy, lovely bite – sized pieces.

4V7A0477_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

lemon rice

15th October 2016

4V7A4788_1980x1297

A delicious recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma. Lemon rice is a simple and tasty dish, it is easily digested and suitable for all constitutions. It can be used daily and throughout all seasons.  Serve with a simple vegetable palya, green salad or with a cucumber raytha.

jasmin-balal-circlejasmin-garlandmaking-jasmine

Beautiful India

Mallige – Jasmine flower, Mysore 

4V7A4809_1_1980x1297

Lemon Rice (Chitraanna)

Serves 3 – 4

Split bengal gram & urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store, when briefly fried in the oil they add a lovely crunch to the dish.  The fresh curry leaves when stored in the freezer keep their flavour up to 6 months – they have wonderful medicinal qualities. 

Use heaped when measurements except stated otherwise.

ingredients :

1 cup white rice

3 cups water

¼ cup peanut/melted coconut oil

½ tsp black mustard seeds

2 tsp split bengal gram (channa dal)

1 tsp split urad dal (black gram)

1 medium, mild dried red chilli

10 raw cashew nuts

1 tsp cumin seeds

10 fresh curry leaves

⅛ tsp asafoetida powder (hingu)

⅛ tsp turmeric powder

1 medium carrot (1 cup grated)

2 tsp grated ginger

½ cup dried unsweetened shredded coconut

1 tsp rock salt

1 tsp sugar / jaggery

1 -2 Tblsp lemon juice

¼ cup chopped coriander leaves

to prepare the rice:

In a heavy based saucepan, wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs off clear then drain. Pour in the water and bring to boil over a medium – high heat,  then reduce the heat to maintain a simmer rapid.  Do not cover the pot with a lid, the this allows certain impurities or energetic imbalances to be eliminated.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until water has almost completely evaporated. Turn off the heat, cover and set aside to cool.

While waiting for the rice to cool, halve the cashews, grate the ginger and cut the chilli into 3-4 pieces. Using a box grater, grate the carrot – 1 measuring cup. Rinse and chop the fresh coriander. Set aside.

to prepare the lemon rice:

In a skillet over medium heat, add the oil and mustard seeds; When the seeds start to splutter and pop (make sure the mustard seeds have popped well), add the bengal gram, urad dal, and fry for a few seconds, Then add the chilli, cashews, and cumin seeds. Fry until bengal gram is golden in colour (depending on the skillet / pot you are using, you may need to lower the heat while frying). Add the curry leaves, asafoetida and turmeric powder, and to continue to fry for a few seconds.  

4V7A4740_1980x1297

Stir in the grated carrot, ginger, coconut, salt, jaggery and lemon juice, cook for approximately 6 minutes, until all ingredients have combined and the carrot is soft. Turn off the heat.

4V7A4749_1980x1297

Add the cooked rice (make sure it has cooled first) and combine the rice with the grated carrot & spices. Stir in the fresh coriander. Using the right palm of the hand, gently combine, to ensure the rice is mixed well with the spices.
4v7a4754_1980x1297

Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt, sugar/jaggery or lemon.  Serve immediately.  Lemon rice can be served with raytha, plain yogurt or accompanied with a vegetable palya.

4V7A4794_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

raw zucchini pasta with a creamy green garden dressing

3rd October 2016

4V7A5902_1980x1297

This is a recipe created last year for a series of raw dishes for Holmes Place, however I never got around to posting it here.  Also included, was this raw carrot slice and a refreshing, light gazpacho. A wonderful addition would be Donna’s roasted thyme-infused cherry tomatoes, and for a more substantial meal, you could even use a combination of zucchini noodles and cooked whole-grain pasta.

4V7A6880_1980x12974V7A5939_1980x1297 4V7A6878_1980x1297

~ Garden, bursting with beans and zucchini

4V7A5909_1980x1297

raw zucchini pasta with a creamy green  garden dressing

This is a light, refreshing raw meal and makes a great pasta replacement.  I love how the zucchini noodles behave so similarly to pasta. Tossed with a creamy herb dressing, it is a perfect meal on a hot Summer’s day. And is perfect for using up the surplus of summer zucchini in the garden.  

Serves 4 

Recipe slightly adapted from here

for the noodles :

2 large/800g mixed zucchini (yellow and green zucchini are always nice)

½ tsp fine Himalayan salt

for the creamy garden dressing :

½ cup raw cashews (soaked overnight/a minimum of 4 hours)

2 Tblsp water

2 Tblsp extra-virgin olive oil

2 Tblsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 Tblsp balsamic vinegar

½ cup chopped fresh basil

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

2 Tblsp fresh mint leaves

freshly ground pepper

pine nut parmesan for sprinkling

to make the noodles :

Wash, dry and cut the ends off the zucchini.  Take a box grater and place it on its side – the side with the largest grating holes on it face up.

With pressure and in long strokes, push the zucchini along the top of the grater in order to create long, thin ribbons of zucchini.  Or alternatively, use a vegetable peeler or mandolin to make long ribbons.

4V7A5886_1980x1297

Sprinkle the zucchini with the salt, toss gently, and place in a colander over a bowl for 20 minutes, allowing the excess liquid in the zucchini to drain.  Carefully and gently squeeze the zucchini over the colander.  Pat with a clean, absorbent kitchen towel to dry and soak up more of the liquid.

for the creamy garden dressing :

Drain the soaked cashew nuts.  Place in a high-speed blender or food processor, with the water, vinegar, olive oil and lemon juice.   Blend until smooth and creamy.  Add the basil, parsley and mint leaves and blend again until the herbs are well incorporated.

to assemble :

Using your hands, gently toss the zucchini with about three-quarters of the dressing.  Sprinkle over the pine nut parmesan, a few rounds of fresh pepper and toss again, using more dressing if needed.  To serve, garnish with more pine nut parmesan, and small leaves of basil and mint.  This dish is best served immediately.

4V7A5960_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

almond quinoa chocolate bars

21st September 2016

 

4v7a7529_1980x1297

Cool softened air, full moon swell, falling leaves, savouring the light….

4v7a7558_1_1980x12974v7a7461_1980x12974v7a7558_1_1980x1297

These have been a decadent treat around here.  Loved by all.  Perfect when you need something more than a dried date or fig for a sweet after a meal.  Based on this recipe from Green Kitchen Stories – a wonderful video is included showing you just how easy they are to make.  I altered the recipe slightly, adding ¼ cup hot water to the dates when mashing them. Even though the dates I used were soft, the hot water helped in the overall consistency. Instead of pumpkin seeds, I used extra almonds and toasted them to make them snappy and to bring out their flavour. I prefer using just almonds, as their qualities are less heating than most other nuts and seeds.  You could use a carob topping instead of the chocolate, by melting down carob buttons or using this glaze.

4v7a7555_1980x1297

almond quinoa chocolate bars

Makes 16 squares.

ingredients:

2 Tblsp coconut oil

200g soft medjool dates – approximately 10 dates

¼ cup hot water

1 cup/250g home-made almond butter

1 Tblsp fresh ginger, grated

a pinch rock salt, optional

½ cup/55 grams toasted almonds/hazelnuts

1 cup/80g puffed quinoa

for the chocolate topping:

100g dark chocolate

3 Tblsp dried unsweetened coconut

preparation:

Preheat the oven to 350F/180C.

to roast the almonds:

Place the whole almonds/hazelnuts on a tray and toast for approximately 8 minutes.  If using hazelnuts – while they are still warm, rub the nuts in a towel to remove the skins.  Allow to cool, finely chop and set aside.

to make the almond quinoa bars:

Line a 7 x 7/8 x 10-inch baking tray with baking paper, leaving 2 inches around the edges.

Remove the seeds from the dates and measure out 200 grams.  Set aside.  Melt the coconut oil in a medium saucepan over low heat. Take off the heat and add the dates into the saucepan with the coconut oil.  Add the hot water and mash with a fork.  Mix in the almond butter, ginger and salt, stirring until it all comes together.  Remove from heat and add the puffed quinoa, chopped roasted almonds/hazelnuts, incorporating everything evenly.

Using your hands, press the mixture very tightly into the lined dish, until completely even and flat. Using the edges of the baking paper, fold over and run your finger along the edges to create level sides and corners.  Place in the freezer while preparing the chocolate coating.

to melt the chocolate topping:

Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over barely simmering water. Remove from heat, then using a spatula, spread the chocolate evenly over the slice. Sprinkle with half the shredded coconut, leaving the other half to sprinkle on later.

Place in the freezer for at least two hours, until cold and firm. Using a sharp knife, cut into bite-sized squares or rectangular bars. Store in an airtight container in the freezer. The bars will keep for a month.

4v7a7548_1_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

green bean palya

11th September 2016

4V7A2617_1980x1297

This is a great dish to make in late August when you have a glut of beans that cannot be picked fast enough and are becoming quite tough and in need of that extra boiling time to soften and bring out the flavour.  The climbing bean would have to be one of my favourite vegetables growing in the garden.  Once they are at their peak they continue to produce at a fast and furious rate.  Here, in Europe I grow the runner beans which have proven to do the best, being most resilient and tough, in this odd unpredictable, misty, Sintra climate.  They also produce the most beautiful flowers of ivory and cream.

Before leaving for our Summer holiday I planted a second round of climbing beans, planting in hope to extend the season, but alas only two came up, fortunately I also threw in a bed of very old french beans to clean out my seed box.  To my surprise all sprouted with robust enthusiasm and are close to picking in two weeks, I just hope the weather stays warm as we edge our way into early Autumn.  This is the warmest and dryist of Summers we have had since arriving in Portugal and the garden is rejoicing in it.

4V7A6848_1980x12974V7A6877_1980x12974V7A6865_1980x1297 4V7A6890_1980x1297

This dish may be used as a condiment or independently served with rice, chapati or poori.  It strengthens the body, is easily digested and is suitable for all constitutions.   Suitable to be used daily and throughout all seasons.  For a variation of taste, lemon juice can be added at the end of preparation.  This variation is recommended when eating with rice.

4V7A2607_1980x1297

Green Bean Palya

The chilli, commonly used in South Indian cooking, is Byadagi chilli and is known for its deep red colour; it is relatively sweet and less spicy.  If unsure about the level of spice of the chilli you are using, leave whole or cut in half.

The Byadagi chilli, split bengal gram & urad dāl can be purchased at your local Indian store.

Serves 4

Recipe shared by our teacher Ganapati Aarya, as part of the Jivana Yoga Diploma.  

ingredients :

4 cups (420g) green beans

4 Tblsp peanut/melted coconut oil

1 tsp black mustard seeds

1 Tblsp split bengal gram (chickpea)

1 tsp split urad dāl (black gram)

1 tsp cumin seeds

2 medium, mild dried red chilies,chopped

tsp hingu powder (asafoetida)

½ tsp turmeric powder

20-25 fresh curry leaves

375ml (1½ cups) water

5 Tblsp dried shredded coconut

1 tsp rock salt

2 tsp jaggery/sugar

½ cup chopped coriander leaves

Preparation:

Wash, top-tail and chop the green beans into small pieces.  Set aside.

In a heavy bottom skillet, over a medium flame, heat the oil and add the mustard seeds; wait until they start to splatter and pop and then add the bengal gram, urad dāl, cumin seeds, chillies, and hingu. 

Fry until bengal gram and urad dāl have turned golden in colour then add the turmeric powder and curry leaves.

4V7A2588_1980x1297

Add to the skillet the chopped beans, water, salt and jaggery. 

Stir to combine.  Simmer rapidly on medium heat until the beans have softened – approximately 15 minutes.  If wanting more of a firm bean, simmer for less time.

4V7A2595_1980x1297

Turn off the heat and stir in the dried coconut and fresh coriander leaves. 

4V7A2600_1980x1297

Allow to sit for 5 minutes in order to cool slightly and for the flavours to be absorbed.  Taste, adding more salt or jaggery, as needed.

4V7A2623_1980x1297

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

blackberry – acai popsicle

2nd September 2016

4V7A6016_1980x1297

A gorgeous coloured blackberry sorbet in celebration with the season, with the added benefits of acai – a recipe for the Holmes Place magazine; an ongoing concept of ‘super foods ‘ throughout the year.

‘Acai is a rich, deep purple fruit which is similar in shape to a grape and has a mild chocolate-y berry sweetness. These berries grow in huge clusters near the tops of palm trees, which grow in the Amazon rain forests. Each Acai berry contains just 10% fruit and pulp and a large seed, which has no benefits, so harvesting this fruit is laborious since the tree has no branches and each cluster of berries needs to be cut and brought down manually in order to preserve the fruit and pulp.  Within the nutritional pulp and skin, Acai berries are packed with antioxidants, amino acids, fibre, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. It helps to increase your antioxidant levels, boosts your energy levels, supports your immune system and helps to promote a healthy digestive system.’

There are three basic ways to add acai to a recipe: acai powder, acai juice and acai frozen smoothie packs. Here, I choose to use the powder which is more widely available and which has been freeze-dried instantly to preserve the active components and is not overly processed. The powder can be added to smoothies, juices, home-made ice creams, sprinkled over your morning porridge, or added into raw treats.

4V7A1285_1980x12974V7A1581_1980x12974V7A1586_1980x1297

~home~

4V7A6019_1980x1297

Blackberry-Acai Popsicle

Makes 9 small popsicles

If you don’t have blackberries, try a different berry variety, blueberries, raspberries or even strawberries.  For a creamier sorbet, replace the apple juice with coconut cream by refrigerating a tin of coconut milk, & scooping out the white thick cream on top.   If you don’t have access to acai powder, it can be easily omitted. 

ingredients:

3 cups fresh blackberries, washed

2 medium ripe frozen bananas

½ cup unsweetened apple juice or fruit juice of choice

2 teaspoon acai powder

2 Tablespoon natural sweetener of choice (coconut sugar, maple syrup or honey)

preparation:

Wash the berries and place in a high-speed blender or food processor, along with the peeled frozen bananas, apple juice, & acai powder.  Blend until smooth and creamy, stopping if you need to push the fruit down with a rubber spatula.  Taste, and add sweetener, if required.  Blend again to incorporate the sweet.

Spoon or pour into your popsicle holders, & freeze until firm or enjoy as is, for an instant treat.  When ready, pull the popsicle out of their moulds by running them under some warm water. 

4V7A6021_1980x1297

References – https://www.victoriahealth.com/editorial/facts-and-myths-about-acai-berry

Goodness shared by Stacey

Print Friendly

All rights reserved © Goodness is…. · Theme by Blogmilk + Coded by Brandi Bernoskie